The Dirty Picture: Music Review (Vishal-Shekhar)

..and Vishal-Shekhar are almost back to being Vishal-Shekhar.

Ooh la la is, as it is supposed to sound, does sound like an average famous song of ’80s n earlier ’90s. Bappi Lahiri is a nice choice for the song and Shreya is not even questionable. The ‘gira ke apna pallu’ part is a total twenty-years-ago material. Awesomeness in its own way.

The first notes of Ishq Sufiana remind me of badmash dil, but from the very rendering of ‘rab ki kawali hai’ the song sounds like making of something big. The song is definitely nice, but as of now I am loving Sunidhi’s female version of the song more, a rare thing as I mostly prefer male versions of songs, just an observation. At the same time would like to tell that Kamal sings really well (expected after his performances in Saregamapa) for a new singer.
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Rascals: Music Review (Vishal-Shekhar)

The title song is not really a great one, and just passes the regular Neeraj Shridhar number mark. While the next, Tik tuk tik tuk is an interesting one, not just because of additive music and lyrics but also Daler Mehndi.

The next, Neeraj Shridhar and Sunidhi’s Pardaa Nasheen, again is not too impressive, even though the melody of the song is nice.

The last song of the album, Shake it saiyyan, sung by Sunidhi Chauhan with Haji Springer is more like a remix album of the early 2000s, but sounds fine nonetheless. In fact the arrangements of the song are nice too, and overall it is one of the better songs of the album.

Interestingly, the two remixes there, for title song and shake it saiyyan, are both not bad as well.

Overall, Rascals is okay to listen on radio or in the movie IF you watch the movie, but I don’t think there is much worth buying in the album.

Ra.One: Music Review (Vishal-Shekhar)

To start with, Vishal-Shekhar have tried to created an album as international as possible. Out of the fifteen tracks, there are a number of themes, and some four of the songs have good amount of English.

The album starts with Chhammak Chhallo, about which I don’t think I need to write much as the song has been there for long now. The only two things I’d say are, one, Akon’s pronunciation of Hindi words is quite impressive, and two, love the song or hate it, it’s addictive. Highly so.

The second song, Dildara Dildara, based on Ben King’s Stand by me, is nice. Shafqat’s rendition of the song makes it a regular but very much lovable song. May sound templated on Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy’s patterns, but it’s great to listen to anyway.

The third track, Criminal, sung by Akon again, with Shruti Pathak and Vishal Dadlani, is addictive as papappap, as well as dhinna dhinna. Addictive again, though the album seems to be getting a bit repetitive here.
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Buddha Hoga Tera Baap: Music Review

After what I saw in the promos, and after knowing that the songs were sung by Amitabh, what came in the first song, Haal-e-dil, definitely surprised me. This romantic number has the first half sung by Amitabh with very little music in the background, and when the music is there in the second half, it makes the song even better. A lovely one. DO listen if you like Big B singing.

Then the title song is of course what you have heard on the TV in the promos. The rappish number is hummable but not much musical and hence not very good without the video.

After that, the Dub step version that also brings in Vishal Dadlani, is not an instantly likable thing, but then in some places the processing of the song is interesting and if you are one for technical stuff in songs, you might want to try the song once.

The last song of the album is Sunidhi’s Main Chandigarh di star, picturised on Raveena Tandon. The song, almost completely in Punjabi, has some interesting music, but much more interesting lyrics. In my opinion, if the video is good, the song may click well.

As for music, there is nothing much in the album except for the one Haal-e-dil, in which Big B sounds very musical, at least to the his fan in me. Rest of the album should be just enough to support the movie.

Chammak Challo (Ra.One) Akon: Leaked n reviewed

OK. This one is an illegal review. Or should I say a legal review of an illegally ‘leaked’ song. Either way, a song by Akon in a Bollywood movie was too attractive a prospect to leave unheard. Or even unreviewed. So there I go.

The first thing I had to notice in the song: Akon can sing Hindi lines beautifully. Kaisa sharmana aaja nach ke dikha de. Aa meri hove aaja parda gira de. Aa meri akhiyon se akhiyan mila le. Aa tu na nakhre dikha seem to be sung almost as good as any foreigner has ever sung in Hindi.

The second thing, the song is a typical Akon number. I don’t know if the song is an Akon’s composition or Vishal-Shekhar’s, but either way, Akon has made it his song completely. The song is addictive as Akon’s songs generally are and I’m pretty sure wannabe my Chhammak challo is gonna be there almost everywhere.

Check the lyrics of Chhammak Chhallo HERE and check the meaning of Chhammak Chhallo HERE.

Tees Maar Khan: Music Review

Tees Maar Khan comes as a relief. The relied that Vishal-Shekhar finally create something that is not the same as I Hate Love Storys and Break ke Baad. As for what it IS, the music comes as some Masala music for the masala film Tees Maar Khan is going to be.

The album starts with a very Characteristic title song that very much identifies itself with the movie, as the movie is supposed to be on a person who steals money from biggies, something similar happens with the song, which copies music from here and there and just puts it here. Quite a bogus thing from Shirish Kunder, where the only thing worth knowing is that Sonu Nigam is all the voices in the song.

Now, Vishal-Shekhar come into the picture, or Sound, to be more precise. The first song is Sheila ki Jawani, sung by Sunidhi Chauhan and supported by Vishal Dadlani. Now the song is not a typical item number with all desi moves as the title may suggest, but it’s an item number with a fake-spohisticated touch, but sounds fine as the fakeness is deliberate. The good thing is that Vishal-Shekhar know what they are doing. Vishal sounds good in his few lines. Okay as of now, should be very likeable in the video.

Wallah re Wallah, which also features Saregemapa’s Kamal Khan among its many singers, is a highlight of the album. A qawwali with some okay lyrics and well-made music is worth listening to. In fact for keeping the qawwali sound good even with all those added beats should have been something not really easy for the composers. Good work there. Makes for a good listen and I guess would make a perfect thing with a jazzy video showing Salman Khan. The wallah wallah part can prove addictive while the rest of the song goes good on melody. Expect the song to be a rage if the video comes out good. Should be.

Badey Dilwala, the next, is a Dabangg Omkara thing with an added comic mood, trying to make things sound a bit different from the two songs and kind of succeeding. But then Sukhwinder Singh singing the song again makes you think about Dabangg and Omkara, can’t help it. Sukhwinder though sounds more like in a Dil-haara form. Some very interesting lyrics add to the interest and popularity quotients of the song.

The fifth n last song of the album, fourth by V-S, is Happy Ending, a song with some beautiful chorus and some lovely plus slightly comic lyrics. The best part of the lyrics is the honesty of them and Vishal-Shekhar somehow are really good at sounding honest, right from the time they created Tu Ashiqui Hai, not comparing the two songs at all, at the same time. The song starts with something that gives you a feel you’re going to get a ‘chaand taare tod laaun (Yes Boss)’ and then moves on to get you something more comic than what you probably, still not disappointing. Also, with Prajakta Shukre, Harshit Saxena, Abhijeet Sawant and Debojit singing the song, I somehow got an Indian Idol feel in the song, but I cannot say if that was just a figment of my own imagination. O yeah, I know Harshit was in VoI, but then majority counts. 🙂

Overall Tees Maar Khan is not a musical thing to be precise, but then the music is fine and very much in sync with the movie that Tees Maar Khan is expected to be. What you might miss in this one after Om Shanti Om is just a Ajab si ajab si adaayein. Jag Soona Soona Laage was not meant to be a part of Tees Maar Khan anyway I guess.

As of now, what I loved the most, a bit surprisingly for myself, is ‘Happy Ending.’

Let Down: Tees Maar Khan title. I think the title theme should have been given to V-S. They can prove pretty good at such things. Doesn’t the Golmaal theme say so?

Break ke Baad: Predictable..

I have some strange opinion about Break ke Baad. I was quite waiting for the album and now that it’s arrived and I see things similar to what I had expected, I am disappointed.

The album sounds quite like a typical Vishal-Shekhar thing, something I never wanted to exist, because I never wanted them to be typecast. Anyway, here is a review of the album. Btw, there is one thing in album I totally loved, Prasoon Joshi’s lyrics.

The first song, Adhoore tum Adhoore hum sung by Vishal Dadlani and Alyssa Mendonça is a rock-ish thing that you can hear and tell the composer now. The song is quite likeable and gets stuck in the mind, and fairly speaking, everything with the song is right other than its predictability. Alyssa’s voice sounds good here too. Go for it.
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Anjaana Anjaani. Musical Surprise.

The very first on Anjaana Anjaani. After IHLS I was somehow expecting pretty high from the album, but Vishal-Shekhar go beyond my expectations. It’s certainly worth a listen.

The album starts with Anjaana Anjaani ki Kahani which is already there on televisions for quite sometime. While the short promo of the song rocks, the song, sung by Monali and Nikhil D’Souza offers a bit more and you get something that is sure shot party material.

The second, Hairat, is a hairat for me. I mean, surprise. Not that I was expecting anything less with Lucky Ali there but the way he sings so lively at the age of 51 simply amazes me. And then, before I start on Lucky’s singing, another thing that amazed me in the album was Vishal Dadlani’s lyrics. He’s always been good with lyrics of kinda fun and rocking songs, but here he impresses with his poetry. As for Lucky’s singing and V-S composition, will it suffice to say that I find it difficult to move to the next song?

Anyway, I move to the next and I’m welcomed by Rahat Fateh Ali Khan’s Aas Paas Khuda is typical and good. Something that I’m repeating about Rahat songs a lot, but then I guess Rahat is being kinda stereotyped compared to his immense talent for whatsoever reasons. Still, like most of the times, Vishal-Shekhar add some bits here and there trying to make things more interesting, and I’d say it works. In short, a typical Rahat song of the times we live in.

I have always been a fan of Vishal and Shekhar’s voices, and so the next song Tumse hi Tumse is a treat for me. As the song starts with guitar, I think for a moment if something like Bin Tere unplugged was coming, but the moment passes quickly and the song turns into what I’d say a Lucky’ish mode as soon as Shekhar starts singing. Caralisa’s quite fast English (rap?) sounds interesting to say the least, but the hero of this one is Shekhar Ravjiani. He’s going to get more people saying, ‘This is for you Shekhar!’ Oh, btw, the end of the song has some nice effects on Caralisa’s voice. This simple but beautiful one is a must listen.

As far as I remember, while the world was (and is) standing in queue outside Mohit Chauhan’s home, Vishal-Shekhar were doing it pretty fine without the guy and now that they make him sing a composition of theirs, he gets more than what you can say a typical Mohit Chauhan song. This time Mohit comes with a sad song, Tujhe Bhula Diya. The best part of the song though, for me, was Shruti Pathak’s wonderful start where she sings with near-zero background music. From here on Mohit picks up and where he comes to a still, Shekhar comes with an entry somewhat like Jogi Mahi, with the difference that here things don’t get high like that. Anyway, the point is that the song sounds good from the very first time and the more you hear it, the more you like it.

The next song, I Feel Good, goes on the well-known rock abilities of Vishal and equally unknown rock abilities of Shilpa Rao. Vishal starts singing the song in his soft voice in a way that for once can sound like Shankar Mahadevan’s voice. And then Vishal and Shilpa both completely rock me with the song. The interesting thing is that while the song is something normal for Vishal, it’s strange how Shilpa Rao never (with an exception of Woh Ajnabee, to some extent I guess) sang such a song and was kept to soft numbers with (her) heavy voice. I hope to see her to get more rocking numbers now.

Even more interestingly, the next song, which is the title, Anjaana Anjaani, again has Vishal and Shilpa, this time in a bit different mood. It’s not exactly rock but falls somewhere nearby, something like Sadka Kiya. I never had doubts about Vishal’s abilities as singer but the way he goes singing such wonderful songs, I’m bound to say he’s more a complete musician rather than a composer.

The next track happens to be the remix of Tujhe bhula diya. The track doesn’t impress me, but strangely, it strengthens my belief in the original track. Never mind.

And after a noisy sounding remix, the end comes as a beautiful unplugged version of Aas Paas hai Khuda by Rahat Fateh Ali Khan and Shruti Pathak. Strange to see an extra name in an unplugged version, but then, nobody questions a miracle. Though, for some reason unknown to me too, I didn’t find this one as great and superb and marvelous as Shekhar’s version of bin tere in IHLS. Maybe I’m too fascinated by his voice.

Overall, Anjaana Anjaani is a superb soundtrack. V-S align a bit towards rock, and on the negative side, there are a few things that sound repetitive from them (like one inside Tujhe Bhula Diya) but the overall end result is something that you can rock yourself on, dance to, or simply cherish in a relaxing mood, in short, a perfect soundtrack. As I said, more than I expected.

My favorites (as of now): Hairat, I feel good, Anjaana Anjaani (Vishal-Shilpa), Aas Paas Khuda unplugged, Tumse hi Tumse. And the best part, it’s not easy to decide.

Update: As anticipated (written too), Tujhe Bhula Diya is sounding better every time I hear it. So much so that it is probably the most heard song of the album now, beyond the rest.

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Anjaana Anjaani: Musical Surprise?

Siddharth Anand and Vishal-Shekhar look like in a mood to give some huge surprise with the music of Anjaana Anjaani. After the strange demand of Siddharth, of music being not-good-to-listen-for-the-first-time, there is this soundtrack list which I have got and this too has some surprises in it.

For starters, the album starts with a song sung by Udit Narayan and Alka Yagnik. Frankly, I don’t remember which was the last album that started like that. The second thing, Vishal Dadlani sings a hopping three out of six songs. Well, personally I’d like Shekhar to sing too, after his bin tere in IHLS, but he’s not there. And yes, as it had to be, Lucky Ali sings yet another song.
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Sadka Kiya meaning

If you’re not much into Urdu, this one may bowl you over as Sadka/Sadqa has a meaning that doesn’t come easily from the song Sadka kiya. Sadka literally is ‘giving voluntarily in the name of God’. So the lines Sadqa kiya yoon ishq ka actually mean that the person in question has given love in such abundance that the one who takes, finds the giver whenever s/he bows his/her head.

Bit tough to understand, but that was the meaning I could get out of the lines.

Bahara (I Hate Luv Storys): Shreya-Sona/Rahat Fateh Ali Khan

Sona Mahapatra has an excellent voice, but then it’s such a different from a usual female singer’s voice. Probably that’s the major reason she doesn’t get to sing huge number of songs despite her talent. But then, when she gets something that suits her voice, you certainly get to hear something good. This time there happens something like that as Sona and Shreya Ghoshal come together to sing Bahara in IHLS.

Bahara is a light romantic song with medium pace and a touch of folk in the background. In fact, if I were to tell the composer for the song, I would probably have named Rahman.

The song starts with a beautiful rendition of

Ho tora saajan aayo tore des, Badli badra badla saavan,
Badla jag ne bhes re, Tora saajan aayo tore des
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Sadka Kiya – I Hate Luv Storys: Lyrics n More

Vishal-Shekhar have one of the kings of rock among themselves, one who is called for rock songs by so many composers in Bollywood. But then, Vishal-Shekhar themselves call upon Suraj Jagan to sing this song, so definitely the song had to be good. And so it is.

Well, Sadka kiya is not really a rock song, but it has its lower notes as well as higher notes, and Suraj sounds awesome singing sadka kiya yoon ishq ka. Mahalxmi gets to sing mostly the lower notes in the song and does play her part perfectly.

The best part of the song is that even the lyrics of the song are good, probably better than most other songs of the album. Especially the part of mukhda, Sadka kiya yoon ishq ka, ke sar jhuka jahan, deedar hua, is really good.

Here are the lyrics of the song. (Full meaning here)
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I Hate Luv Storys – Music Review

Vishal-Shekhar’s I Hate Love Stories had been a long expected album, at least for me. And I guess they have done it. Bin tere, I hate Love stories, and Sadka kiya, I’m loving it.

The album starts with Jab Mila tu, which is quite like Dostana’s Jaane Kyun. That way, the song cannot be called very fresh but sounds fine, and will be stuck to our tongues the way Jaane kyun did. I think.

The second song of the album is one of the best, or probably the best, Bin Tere (how many songs are called Bin tere, any idea?). Well, the song, sung by Shafqat Amanat Ali Khan and Sunidhi Chauhan is a wonderful piece of music and definitely worth a listen. Go for it.

The third song of the album is a peppy title song, bas pyaar ka naam na lena, I hate love stories, sung by Vishal Dadlani. Very, very tongue sticking,though I don’t think it’s one for longer times.

Bahara is the next song of the album. The song came as a surprise to me as I had not expected Sona Mahapatra in a Vishal-Shekhar album. I wonder if she has ever worked with the duo. Well, Sona is not the only singer in the song, in fact she is more in the background while the song is actually sung by Shreya Ghoshal. A medium-fast-paced song with a touch of folk. Definitely a good one again.

They had one king of rock with them. But they brought in another one. Yes, Vishal Shekhar call in Suraj Jagan for their next number Sadka Kiya, with Mahalaxmi Iyer. Frankly, Sadka is probably the song I have loved the most till date and the more I am listening to it, the more I am falling into the song. A song that keeps itself light, has beats something like Falak tak (Tashan), with Suraj going high in places, in a way that you would love. The best part, on top of the wonderful music and singing, there are those great lyrics, sadka kiya yoon ishq ka, ke sar jhuka jahan, deedar hua. M lovin’it.

If this was not enough, here is more in remixes, no, reprises and mixes and remixes. The first to come up is Shekhar with a reprise of Bin Tere. Now there’s only a guitar (I hope I didn’t miss anything) and Shekhar’s voice. A real reprise, with hardly any background music. One of the toughest and the best things Shekhar has done. Kudos boy.

Now, a chill mix, Rahat Fateh Ali Khan singing what Shreya and Sona sang earlier. Definitely good work by Rahat and worth listening to song, but I think I have fallen for the original version already.

At the end there is a remix version of Bin Tere, which doesn’t sound bad.

Overall, I Hate Luv Storys seems to be a soundtrack which is better than plain good. A few songs may remind you of things here and there, but overall, almost every song of the album is good, which is a big deal. Well done Vishal-Shekhar.

My Picks: Bin Tere, Sadka Kiya.

Bin Tere – I Hate Luv Storys

I was absolutely in love with the song from the very first time I heard Shafqat Amanat Ali Khan singing ‘hai kya jo tere mere darmiyaan hai’ and right through the song I kept loving him, until Sunidhi comes up to sing ‘raah mein roshni ne hai kyun haath chhoda’ which sounds like something additional to the song. The song is actually a sad, kinda mourning piece in a high note mode. Something that reminds me of KK’s songs from Bas ek Pal. Also, I felt a tinge of tumhi dekho na for a second or two in the beginning of the song.

Whatever I felt, the only thing that matters is that the song is a wonderful piece of music that you would love to listen to. Simply go for it.
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Jab Mila Tu – I Hate Love Stories

Well, it’s good, but it’s typical. The second song that comes up from I Hate Luv Storys sounds more like some old song of Vishal-Shekhar. In fact I can give you something close too. Jaane Kyun dil jaanta hai… from Dostana.

Yes, it’s Vishal again, singing the new song, and probably that’s one more reason I feel Jaane Kyon more n more in the song, though, the beginning visuals and sound both remind me of Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy. By the visual looking like S-E-L I probably mean to say it reminds me of Lakshya.

OK. I think I have confused you enough. So here I summarize.

1. I didn’t find much freshness in the song.
2. I liked the song anyway.

If that too doesn’t make things clear, here is the song for you.

Btw, that mis-misspelling was deliberate. 😉