Ek Main aur Ekk Tu: Music Review (Amit Trivedi)

Ek main aur Ekk tu is a good album, with some variety thrown in by Amit Trivedi. It’s not his type 1, with Anurag Kashyap connection and lots of rock, but type 2, something like Aisha, where there is variety, and freshness. However, I can feel a touch of Anjaana Anjaani in the album, in some of the songs.

Read Full Review here.

Don 2: Music Review (Shankar Ehsaan Loy)

So Farhan Akhtar makes SRK do a Salman in Don 2.

Well, I am not talking about acting, but like almost every Salman film, this time SRK starts the soundtrack of Don 2 with a dialog, that merges into the second track, Zaraa Dil ko thaam lo, beautifully sung by Vishal Dadlani and Anusha Mani. I mean Shankar Ehsaan Loy this time get a voice that sounds like that of a Don instead of Shaan, who sounded all nice, not too fit for a Don I’d say. The melody is nice even though SEL keep the arrangements much as in the previous Don. Nice start.

The thing that most interested me, however, was Usha Uthup’s mysterious voice singing na koi raat hai, na koi din yahaan, to start hai ye maaya. Shankar Ehsaan Loy come up with a nice melody again, though the arrangements have been kept very espionage-y, reminding me of Karthik calling Karthik where this job was entitled to Midival Punditz. Totally like. Precisely, it’s ‘more than background.’

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Ladies v/s Ricky Bahl: Music Review (Salim-Sulaiman)

Salim-Sulaiman once again do well for the Yash Raj banner. Here is a review of Ladies v/s Ricky Bahl.

Aadat se majboor has some experimental sounds with the regular Salim-Sulaiman pop pattern. The tune is catchy and the song sounds quite nice. Easy on ears. Salim-Sulaiman-Benny-YRF is a success again.

The next, Jazbaa sung by Shilpa Rao, has some nice lyrics and Salim-Sulaiman give some simple sounding music for this one, though the choice of instruments doesn’t sound that simple if you listen with attention. Salim’s backing vocals might remind you of Fashion or any other of their songs as well. Still, the song is overall a nice one and the hardwork the composers have put in is clearly audible.

Vishal Dadlani and Shweta Pandit’s poppy Thug le has a bit too simple tune in some parts, and even though the song is made to be catchy, I didn’t feel the song would last long. The lyrics aren’t Amitabh’s best either. Okay.

Salim finally enters with a full-fledged song called Jigar da Tukda, sung with Shradhha Pandit. The Punjabi song with a lot of pop in it, Jigar da tukda is interesting and should be a hit considering the amount of publicity YRF would give it.

Fatal Attraction, the theme, which has Salim in it with an unknown female voice which sounded like Sunidhi Chauhan’s at some points, and which hit me like Marjaava at 1.58 mins, is okay. The remix of Aadat se Majboor sounded nice too, though didn’t like Jazbaa remix much.

Frankly, in Ladies v/s Ricky Bahl, Salim-Sulaiman seem to have tried to do something more than their regular even though staying in their favorite region. So there is something new, a little new sound, but still the signature of Salim-Sulaiman is there. I’d say nice, because the album is definitely good, but yeah, I am still waiting for the duo to be less techno and rely more on melody some time, like they did earlier, in Dor and Aaja Nachle. Hope they’ll come up with something ‘that’ nice too.

Mujhse Fraaandship Karoge: Music Review (Raghu Dixit)

Welcome to Bollywood, Mr Project. (For the uninitiated, Raghu Dixit is the only guy I know whose band is called Project. Hence the loving name.)

Dhaeon Dhaeon sung by Vishal Dadlani and Aditi Singh Sharma is addictive, and still it’s not what you call come n go. Nice.

Ash King and Shilpa Rao’s Uh-oh-uh-oh kya hua is something to love. The music, especially the orchestration of the song sounds quite simple, but I don’t think many people can do it this nicely. Beautiful job by the composer, as well as both the singers. DO listen.
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Ra.One: Music Review (Vishal-Shekhar)

To start with, Vishal-Shekhar have tried to created an album as international as possible. Out of the fifteen tracks, there are a number of themes, and some four of the songs have good amount of English.

The album starts with Chhammak Chhallo, about which I don’t think I need to write much as the song has been there for long now. The only two things I’d say are, one, Akon’s pronunciation of Hindi words is quite impressive, and two, love the song or hate it, it’s addictive. Highly so.

The second song, Dildara Dildara, based on Ben King’s Stand by me, is nice. Shafqat’s rendition of the song makes it a regular but very much lovable song. May sound templated on Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy’s patterns, but it’s great to listen to anyway.

The third track, Criminal, sung by Akon again, with Shruti Pathak and Vishal Dadlani, is addictive as papappap, as well as dhinna dhinna. Addictive again, though the album seems to be getting a bit repetitive here.
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Stanley ka Dabba: Music Review (Hitesh Sonik)

Life bahot simple hai. If you are not yet humming this, you’ll soon be, that much I can tell you for sure. Shaan almost does a bum bum bole without exactly getting into that mood and pitch. A soft, innocent, lovely song that is good for you, whatever age you are.

Sukhwinder’s Dabba has some trying-to-do-a-Gulzar lyrics and while the lyricist Amole Gupte gets some on and off success, the overall effect of music, lyrics, and Sukhwinder’s singing is quite likeable. The innocence in Sukhi’s voice once again tells you how that man of hiiiiighhhhh notes can be humble with his voice too. Nice.

The next comes Nanhi si jaan, a light rock number sung by Shankar Mahadevan with a melody that sounds somewhat like that of the ’90s to me. Still, Shankar makes the song worthwhile to an extent. And then, after listening to the entire album, I expect that the song will find its place as the movie comes up. Hopefully.

The next song, Tere andar bhi kahin, is sung by Vishal Dadlani. The song is a light rock number again, but this one is quite different in its treatment and words take precedence over everything in this one. Somehow Vishal’s voice seems to be doing justice to the poetry in this one. Not too ‘musical,’ but it’s lovely and I expect the movie will make this one a favorite.

The next song, the only one in the album with a female voice, Jhoola Jhool by Hamsika Iyer is a short lullaby that sounds lovely if you’re patient enough. A small piece of good work by Hitesh.

The next small piece, Aditya rox, a version of tere andar bhi kahin, is not really very musical, but I liked it nonetheless. Though I don’t think I’ll be listening much to this one.

The last piece of the album is an instrumental which makes me feel once again that Amole Gupte is not yet out of Taare Zameen Par as ‘Thirsty‘ or Stanley Theme definitely more or less reminds you of Kholo Kholo darwaze more than anything. And then of course, going back to the first song may prove that Amole is at least trying to give people an idea that it’s something, in some way, close to or related to TZP.

Still, the overall impact of the album is good. The music is fresh and Amole’s lyrics definitely speak for his movie only. The good part is that even though you can relate the music to the children’s movie, you can enjoy it anyway, something I’d consider a huge achievement for a debutant album composer in Bollywood.

Game (2011) Music Review – Shankar Ehsaan Loy

I can sum up the album in one sentence. It’s not upto the name of Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy.

The album starts with Vishal Dadlani’s It’s a game. While the song is not an instant thing, Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy’s arrangements with a hangover of Karthik Calling Karthik make Vishal’s good singing work to some extent. You may like it if you pay some attention.

The reprise version sung by Sunitha Sarath seems dull, probably because the voice lacks the life that Vishal has in his voice.

Kaun hai Ajnabi
has some lovely vocals by KK and Aditi Singh Sharma, but the song sounds more of a Pritam number than SEL’s. Not bad, though nothing great. Interestingly, the remix of the song works equally good.

Maine ye kab socha tha is a different side of the album where Shaan comes up to sing a romantic number with Anusha Mani, supported by Loy and almost a chorus, something like in We are Family. Though the song is quite good in parts, it doesn’t really sound like one song in whole and that may be a reason for its failure.

The last original number, Mehki Mehki, sung by Shreya Ghoshal and Kshitij, is a different sound and almost enters the territory of A R Rahman. At some points I just felt like I have heard the song, but it was probably just the ambiance and hence I couldn’t point towards any song. With a slight touch of old Bollywood songs of maybe ’70s and all these new mentioned things, Mehki Mehki is definitely something worth a try. Listen to it and probably you will fall for it in due time.

As for the remix of Mehki Mehki, it’s not bad, but the song loses the beautiful arrangements that existed in the original version and made the soul of the song, so nothing much to listen to here.

Overall, Game is an okay album but if you’re thinking of buying the album just because you know Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy and you know their standard, you may be in for a little disappointment.

Patiala House: Music Review (Shankar Ehsaan Loy)

Laung da Lishkara is something that is definitely going to be a hit. A beautifully created Punjabi song by Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy. The not-too-fast pace of the song is lovely, and how you still don’t want it to be fast and furious is the quality of the music here. The main singer, Jassi seems like a new voice here.

The next, Kyun Main Jaagoon by Shafqat Amanat Ali Khan maybe a bit too slow for loving it the first time, but as you listen to it, you love it more and more. A beautiful track with the background music that slowly grows inside the track. The unplugged version of the song is equally good. Oh, pain in Shafaqat’s voice sounds so very natural in here.

Mehndi vi mehndi, mehndi vi mehndi. Gaadha rang je chadhiya te balle ve balle. I am reminded of Kal ho naa ho. And then of Ajab Prem ki Gazab Kahani as Hard Kaur comes in, and then Shankar Mahadevan sounds all in mad-dance mode. Well, the song sounds a bit broken at the start, but once you’re used to it, the song is definitely gonna rock you. Raula pai gaya. Raula pai gaya. Dil se gaya. Raula pai gaya.

Khwabon ke lifafon mein, kisson mein kitabon mein, Vishal Dadlani sings aadat hai woh in his soft-husky voice. Well, I was surprised quite pleasantly, but a bit confused too as to why Vishal was singing this, and then when I heard usko banane wala kuch kuch to behka hoga, I knew Vishal was the perfect singer for the song. Lovely music, superb lyrics, deep singing. Woh aadat hai is a song with some poetry. I loved it, probably the most in the album, almost as much as Kyun Main Jaagoon. Do listen.

Baby when you talk to me is one more song in the Bollywood rock. This one is sung by Suraj and the way he sings it, it reminds me of Sadka kiya, though the song is not much like that one. Simple tune, and very instantly likable.

The next song, Tumba Tumba tudak gaya, is a kinda slow Punjabi-mixed dance number which stands out for its simplicity. Hans Raj Hans does a beautiful job at this one. The song may not be the best thing when you listen to it the first time, but slowly it takes up its space in your head. Also, have hopes from the video of the video.

Kailash Kher. Richa Sharma. OK. Kailash isn’t here this time, but Richa Sharma sings the mukhda of the bhajan Kailash sang for Road to Sangam. Aval Allah. A small track for the background. Not the full bhajan though, sadly.

The next thing is the remix of kyun main jaagoon. I’m not much into remixes, but quite loved this one. Try once even if you don’t listen to remixes.

The last, baby when you talk to me remix isn’t bad either, probably because there are no huge changes made in the song and speed seems to be the same.

Oh, forgot Raula pai gaya remix. Totally enjoying it.

Overall, Patiala House may not be among the best of Shankar Ehsaan Loy, but like most of their albums, the album has some freshness, and some good ol’ things. To say the least, Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy, once again, don’t disappoint. 🙂

No One Killed Jessica: Music Review. Amit Trivedi.

There are two ways to listen to Dilli.

One. Rock your stereo and include/forget your neighbours.
Two. Fit your earphones well and turn the volume up.

Either way, Dilli rocks. The same deep pain that was there in some songs of Dev.D, has finally come back in Dilli. And while Amit Trivedi’s music is nothing less than awesome, Amitabh Bhaattacharya touches the emotions in very few words. If there is anything missing in the song, move to the hardcore version. * evil smile *

The second song, Aetbaar, brings Bollywood’s rockstar Vishal Dadlani with Amit Trivedi and the result is rocking. Wait, I’m using the word again. No, can’t help. This is a second rocking song in a row. The Sufi touch in ‘dil aetbaar karke ro raha hai’ with Vishal’s very rock singing is worth a praise. Lovable song, and particularly good lyrics by Amitabh.

The next song, Yeh Pal, is a solo by Shilpa Rao where she simply sings Amitabh Bhattacharya’s deep lyrics to a very light music, almost like a poem. While the second half of the same song is an instrumental with Aetbaar visible there. Good, though not catchy and so, may take its own time.

The next song is a very experimental Aali re, which is probably what may be an ‘Amit Trivedi Item Song.’ The song seems to have a Mumbaiyya soul, at least the title ‘aali re’ made me feel so. But with the lines ‘patloon mein junoon hai’ the song almost talks of Delhi too. OK. Don’t take an offence Delhi people. I just mean the not-so-minded-language of the place. Nice experiment, but not a great song. And no, this is Not Motumaster.

And then, there is Dua.

A beautiful voice, that of Meenal Jain, comes up to sing some words after a very light music and then a chorus, sorry, Joi, Raman and Amitabh join in to sing Sab sajde mein, sajde mein, sajde mein, dua karo, with Amit Trivedi turning the song into an anthem-ish style with that chorus and those army band style beats. Not exactly fresh, but effective nevertheless.

So overall, No One Killed Jessica is Good, and has things that you would like to have in an Amit Trivedi album, but then, beyond Dilli and Aetbaar, songs aren’t that fresh, and Aali re sounds like a failure at least for now. Still, will like to see how the song turns out with the video and more listening that is going to be there. So if you have hight hopes, you may be disappointed.

My say, buy the album for Dilli, its hardcore version and Aetbaar. And you will have two songs in bonus, even if you don’t count one. Dilli is the way to go, Sir Trivedi.

Tees Maar Khan: Music Review

Tees Maar Khan comes as a relief. The relied that Vishal-Shekhar finally create something that is not the same as I Hate Love Storys and Break ke Baad. As for what it IS, the music comes as some Masala music for the masala film Tees Maar Khan is going to be.

The album starts with a very Characteristic title song that very much identifies itself with the movie, as the movie is supposed to be on a person who steals money from biggies, something similar happens with the song, which copies music from here and there and just puts it here. Quite a bogus thing from Shirish Kunder, where the only thing worth knowing is that Sonu Nigam is all the voices in the song.

Now, Vishal-Shekhar come into the picture, or Sound, to be more precise. The first song is Sheila ki Jawani, sung by Sunidhi Chauhan and supported by Vishal Dadlani. Now the song is not a typical item number with all desi moves as the title may suggest, but it’s an item number with a fake-spohisticated touch, but sounds fine as the fakeness is deliberate. The good thing is that Vishal-Shekhar know what they are doing. Vishal sounds good in his few lines. Okay as of now, should be very likeable in the video.

Wallah re Wallah, which also features Saregemapa’s Kamal Khan among its many singers, is a highlight of the album. A qawwali with some okay lyrics and well-made music is worth listening to. In fact for keeping the qawwali sound good even with all those added beats should have been something not really easy for the composers. Good work there. Makes for a good listen and I guess would make a perfect thing with a jazzy video showing Salman Khan. The wallah wallah part can prove addictive while the rest of the song goes good on melody. Expect the song to be a rage if the video comes out good. Should be.

Badey Dilwala, the next, is a Dabangg Omkara thing with an added comic mood, trying to make things sound a bit different from the two songs and kind of succeeding. But then Sukhwinder Singh singing the song again makes you think about Dabangg and Omkara, can’t help it. Sukhwinder though sounds more like in a Dil-haara form. Some very interesting lyrics add to the interest and popularity quotients of the song.

The fifth n last song of the album, fourth by V-S, is Happy Ending, a song with some beautiful chorus and some lovely plus slightly comic lyrics. The best part of the lyrics is the honesty of them and Vishal-Shekhar somehow are really good at sounding honest, right from the time they created Tu Ashiqui Hai, not comparing the two songs at all, at the same time. The song starts with something that gives you a feel you’re going to get a ‘chaand taare tod laaun (Yes Boss)’ and then moves on to get you something more comic than what you probably, still not disappointing. Also, with Prajakta Shukre, Harshit Saxena, Abhijeet Sawant and Debojit singing the song, I somehow got an Indian Idol feel in the song, but I cannot say if that was just a figment of my own imagination. O yeah, I know Harshit was in VoI, but then majority counts. 🙂

Overall Tees Maar Khan is not a musical thing to be precise, but then the music is fine and very much in sync with the movie that Tees Maar Khan is expected to be. What you might miss in this one after Om Shanti Om is just a Ajab si ajab si adaayein. Jag Soona Soona Laage was not meant to be a part of Tees Maar Khan anyway I guess.

As of now, what I loved the most, a bit surprisingly for myself, is ‘Happy Ending.’

Let Down: Tees Maar Khan title. I think the title theme should have been given to V-S. They can prove pretty good at such things. Doesn’t the Golmaal theme say so?

Break ke Baad: Predictable..

I have some strange opinion about Break ke Baad. I was quite waiting for the album and now that it’s arrived and I see things similar to what I had expected, I am disappointed.

The album sounds quite like a typical Vishal-Shekhar thing, something I never wanted to exist, because I never wanted them to be typecast. Anyway, here is a review of the album. Btw, there is one thing in album I totally loved, Prasoon Joshi’s lyrics.

The first song, Adhoore tum Adhoore hum sung by Vishal Dadlani and Alyssa Mendonça is a rock-ish thing that you can hear and tell the composer now. The song is quite likeable and gets stuck in the mind, and fairly speaking, everything with the song is right other than its predictability. Alyssa’s voice sounds good here too. Go for it.
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Music Review: Knock Out

Gourov Das Gupta gets a number of big singers in Knock Out, a fact that makes me expect more from him this time. He reaches some of the expectations, but not all. Here is a review.

The album starts with a rock-based title song sung by Vishal Dadlani. Vishal is fine in the song but the song seems to be a bit picked from here and there and rest just added to make up a song. Some traces of Paathshala’s Khushnuma can be found which become all the more visible with Vishal singing the song. Not for listening but might sound ok in the movie as a background number.

After disappointing in the first song, Gourov DG makes a comeback with the next song that is sung by Rahat Fateh Ali Khan. The song comes as a surprise as Rahat sings a song which is not too similar to the songs he’s singing left right and center nowadays. A slower and deeper track with a slight touch of rock that gets fast and enraging in the middle, Khushnuma sa ye roshan ho is something definitely above his own average by the composer. Good one.
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Anjaana Anjaani. Musical Surprise.

The very first on Anjaana Anjaani. After IHLS I was somehow expecting pretty high from the album, but Vishal-Shekhar go beyond my expectations. It’s certainly worth a listen.

The album starts with Anjaana Anjaani ki Kahani which is already there on televisions for quite sometime. While the short promo of the song rocks, the song, sung by Monali and Nikhil D’Souza offers a bit more and you get something that is sure shot party material.

The second, Hairat, is a hairat for me. I mean, surprise. Not that I was expecting anything less with Lucky Ali there but the way he sings so lively at the age of 51 simply amazes me. And then, before I start on Lucky’s singing, another thing that amazed me in the album was Vishal Dadlani’s lyrics. He’s always been good with lyrics of kinda fun and rocking songs, but here he impresses with his poetry. As for Lucky’s singing and V-S composition, will it suffice to say that I find it difficult to move to the next song?

Anyway, I move to the next and I’m welcomed by Rahat Fateh Ali Khan’s Aas Paas Khuda is typical and good. Something that I’m repeating about Rahat songs a lot, but then I guess Rahat is being kinda stereotyped compared to his immense talent for whatsoever reasons. Still, like most of the times, Vishal-Shekhar add some bits here and there trying to make things more interesting, and I’d say it works. In short, a typical Rahat song of the times we live in.

I have always been a fan of Vishal and Shekhar’s voices, and so the next song Tumse hi Tumse is a treat for me. As the song starts with guitar, I think for a moment if something like Bin Tere unplugged was coming, but the moment passes quickly and the song turns into what I’d say a Lucky’ish mode as soon as Shekhar starts singing. Caralisa’s quite fast English (rap?) sounds interesting to say the least, but the hero of this one is Shekhar Ravjiani. He’s going to get more people saying, ‘This is for you Shekhar!’ Oh, btw, the end of the song has some nice effects on Caralisa’s voice. This simple but beautiful one is a must listen.

As far as I remember, while the world was (and is) standing in queue outside Mohit Chauhan’s home, Vishal-Shekhar were doing it pretty fine without the guy and now that they make him sing a composition of theirs, he gets more than what you can say a typical Mohit Chauhan song. This time Mohit comes with a sad song, Tujhe Bhula Diya. The best part of the song though, for me, was Shruti Pathak’s wonderful start where she sings with near-zero background music. From here on Mohit picks up and where he comes to a still, Shekhar comes with an entry somewhat like Jogi Mahi, with the difference that here things don’t get high like that. Anyway, the point is that the song sounds good from the very first time and the more you hear it, the more you like it.

The next song, I Feel Good, goes on the well-known rock abilities of Vishal and equally unknown rock abilities of Shilpa Rao. Vishal starts singing the song in his soft voice in a way that for once can sound like Shankar Mahadevan’s voice. And then Vishal and Shilpa both completely rock me with the song. The interesting thing is that while the song is something normal for Vishal, it’s strange how Shilpa Rao never (with an exception of Woh Ajnabee, to some extent I guess) sang such a song and was kept to soft numbers with (her) heavy voice. I hope to see her to get more rocking numbers now.

Even more interestingly, the next song, which is the title, Anjaana Anjaani, again has Vishal and Shilpa, this time in a bit different mood. It’s not exactly rock but falls somewhere nearby, something like Sadka Kiya. I never had doubts about Vishal’s abilities as singer but the way he goes singing such wonderful songs, I’m bound to say he’s more a complete musician rather than a composer.

The next track happens to be the remix of Tujhe bhula diya. The track doesn’t impress me, but strangely, it strengthens my belief in the original track. Never mind.

And after a noisy sounding remix, the end comes as a beautiful unplugged version of Aas Paas hai Khuda by Rahat Fateh Ali Khan and Shruti Pathak. Strange to see an extra name in an unplugged version, but then, nobody questions a miracle. Though, for some reason unknown to me too, I didn’t find this one as great and superb and marvelous as Shekhar’s version of bin tere in IHLS. Maybe I’m too fascinated by his voice.

Overall, Anjaana Anjaani is a superb soundtrack. V-S align a bit towards rock, and on the negative side, there are a few things that sound repetitive from them (like one inside Tujhe Bhula Diya) but the overall end result is something that you can rock yourself on, dance to, or simply cherish in a relaxing mood, in short, a perfect soundtrack. As I said, more than I expected.

My favorites (as of now): Hairat, I feel good, Anjaana Anjaani (Vishal-Shilpa), Aas Paas Khuda unplugged, Tumse hi Tumse. And the best part, it’s not easy to decide.

Update: As anticipated (written too), Tujhe Bhula Diya is sounding better every time I hear it. So much so that it is probably the most heard song of the album now, beyond the rest.

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Anjaana Anjaani: Musical Surprise?

Siddharth Anand and Vishal-Shekhar look like in a mood to give some huge surprise with the music of Anjaana Anjaani. After the strange demand of Siddharth, of music being not-good-to-listen-for-the-first-time, there is this soundtrack list which I have got and this too has some surprises in it.

For starters, the album starts with a song sung by Udit Narayan and Alka Yagnik. Frankly, I don’t remember which was the last album that started like that. The second thing, Vishal Dadlani sings a hopping three out of six songs. Well, personally I’d like Shekhar to sing too, after his bin tere in IHLS, but he’s not there. And yes, as it had to be, Lucky Ali sings yet another song.
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Reham-O-Karam!

One of the best songs I have heard in past some time. Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy and Vishal, rock together in Karan’s We are Family. So here are the lyrics of the song.

aaj phir din hua
phir armaan jagne lage
chahaten uthi, nayi,
lo seene mein benaam si,
khwahishen dabi hui
kai dilon mein kayi
kya hua kyon bhala
dil mazaron se ho gaye
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