Mod: Music Review (Tapas Relia)

Shivam Pathak and Shreya Ghoshal’s ‘Tu hi tu‘ is nice in music, its orchestration, and singing as well. The slow, restricted number with relatively light music is easy on ears, while Shivam Pathak’s so-heard voice seems really nice in the song.

The next song, Ae meri jaaniya, happens to be a solo for Shivam, and he, kind of expectedly, sounds a lot like in the footsteps of Sonu Nigam, in his early days, though the husky touch give a different character to his voice. Nice singing by him on the slow number, but I guess there is scope for improvement for him, more in the level of confidence.
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Force (2011): Music Review (Harris Jayaraj, Lalit Pandit)

Harris Jayaraj is here.

After Kakka Kakka and Gharshana, the song that is Khwabon Khwabon here, is as good as it was back in 2003 and 2004. Yes, it has the potential to be a rage here as well, especially with the Gibberish Suchitra is performing for the third time. Do listen.

The next, Chahoon bhi is nothing less than awesome. Bombay Jaishree sings the gem with her usual superbness, but when Karthik enters the song, the quality goes only up. A superb, lovely, slow, must-listen number. Hats off to Harris Jayaraj. As far as I know, it’s a new composition by him. Let me know if I am wrong there.

Dum hai to Aaja, composed by Lalit Pandit and sung by Mahua Kamat, is a simple tune with not-too-hard rock style. Lalit Pandit is not too great with his music, nor are the lyrics too great. Mahua could be better, and the same goes for the song.

Main Chali, again a composition of Harris, clearly states his re-entry in the album within seconds. The song sung by Naresh Iyer and Shreya singing reminds me of the earlier days of Rahman, or to some extent Ghajini in its arrangement. Totally worth a try, especially for the variety of music he has put in one song. And yes, it is Shreya Ghoshal only, a little difficult to believe at some points, even though she sings in her typical style.

For the last song again, you don’t need the album’s cover to decide who has composed this one. Harris this time brings in Vijay Prakash, Shalini Singh and Neha Bhasin for Dil ki hai Tamanna. The music is light and simple, with basic, light arrangements, while vocals take priority once again, and Vijay Prakash just amazes with his voice. Neha Bhasin’s voice is well used too.

Overall, Force is awesomeness from Harris. The only thing I am wondering about is why the producers asked Lalit for a song. With this kind of music, even Munni would not fit well.

If you’re one for quality music, Go. Buy.

Love u Mr Kalakaar Music Review (Sandesh Shandilya)

I don’t really look forward to Tusshar Kapoor’s movies. Or their music. But recently, it seems things are becoming different. Last week it was Shor in the City and this time it’s none other than Sandesh Shandilya’s Love u Mr Kalakaar that seem to have changed things for at least now. Here comes a review.

Sandesh’s album starts with a song called Sarphira sa hai dil, sung by Shreya and, wait-for-it, Neeraj Shridhar. Well, Sandesh seems to be doing things more market-way in this one (and hence comes Neeraj) but not in a negative way. A soft-romantic and good melody but with some not-so-typical-of-him arrangements from the composer. Sounds more like a good work of Pritam, definitely worth a try.

The next song, Tera Intezaar, brings in Vijay Prakash and Gayatri Ganjawalla and while this one may not be loved by some fans of Sandesh Shandilya’s fans (I hope he has some), it’s a good one again. The beats may sound a bit too much but Vijay Prakash gets to sing a lovely one and I think the song can pick up quite fast.

The next song, Bhoore Bhoore Badal has Kunal Ganjawalla and Shreya doing some back-to-Shandilya singing. Nice and kinda experimental one with some good lyrics, but somehow this poetry doesn’t take off as well as I expected at the start. Still do listen to the song if you like Shandilya’s music. You might like it as well.

Kunal-Gayatri Ganjawalla sung title song is the, well, boring title song, for probably the credits. Kunal in his typical style and not too bad, but nothing really musical.

Next comes a Mohit Chauhan-Shivangi Kashyap sung Kahin se Chali aa, which is attracting from the very first word. I need not say that Mohit Chauhan and Sandesh can be a deadly combination, and in this one Mohit seems to be just gliding his voice on the music in a very natural style without any special treatment. Kinda soothing, though I probably won’t say the same for Shivangi.

Again, Reeky Dev’s revisited Tera Intezaar isn’t bad. The Mumbai-based-Bangladeshi singer (says FB) does sound good here. Will probably look for the name going further.

The last, Reaching for the Rainbow sung by Jenice Sobti and Vinnie Hutton, is a soothing all-English melody, which somehow enticed such a hardly-ever English listener. Not bad, I guess.

Overall, Love u Mr Kalakaar seems to be a good step as it definitely goes beyond my expectations, which was actually a big naught (I didn’t know it was a Barjatya’s thing) and even though the album is not something huge, the songs are okay and almost all are at least worth a try. So do listen to the album and decide how many songs would stick to your playlist. I expect a few, at least kahin se chali aa, and probably a version of Tera intezaar.

FALTU: Music Review (Sachin-Jigar)

The album starts with a typical Atif song, Leja tu mujhe. Sachin Jigar create another likable but so-usual number for Atif and he sings it regularly. You can have a feel of Prince here, but I’d say the song is better than an average song of Prince. Still, you miss nothing if you don’t listen to it.

When you listen to the lyrics of Chaar baj gaye, for once you feel that the song is a try to make another Amplifier, but then there are certain differences and Hard Kaur is a bit different from what she does in every second album nowadays. The song is okay in composition but the mixture of composition, lyrics and vocals should be enough to make the song a party thing, that, if it reaches enough people.

In the next, Rab sab se sona, Sachin-Jigar do a full Pritam and make Neeraj Shridhar do a song that is typical him. The song, a relatively slow composition, works simply for its arrangements that completely go with Neeraj’s voice.

The next song, awaaz, is sung by one of the composer duo, Jigar. And while the lyrics of the album seem to stand out from the first two lines, very soon one may find similarities to A R Rahman and Sohail Sen’s patriotic compositions (latter from KHJJS). Still, the song is not too similar to any song and sounds like a good one with some fine lyrics and some likable music as well. Do try this one.

With Mika and a song named Fully Faltu, the album takes a one eighty turn and comes to a completely I-will-make-you-hum-this-at-any-cost song. Yes, aaltu-jalaltu part of the song is a bit catchy, very easy, and highly repeated so that one’s mind is almost pressurised to place it somewhere. Nothing too great, but with the tactics and promos, it should work.

Vijay Prakash and Priya Panchal come next with Gale laga le, another compositions with slight Rahman effects. I suppose this is no coincidence that the composers have come up with one of Rahman’s favorite singers. But beyond Vijay, I liked the voice of Priya who seemed to sing something like Shilpa Rao and somehow Alyssa Mendonça too. Though I liked the song, I don’t think the song offers a lot more than awaaz.

Nayee Subah is sung again by Jigar, but this time it’s something like Ale (Golmaal 3). I wonder how I’m able to find everything in the album similar to something else, but this is what I feel with every song I hear in the album.

Anyway, while the penultimate song, O Teri, sung by Jigar again, is more about seen and unseen Obscenities, Neuman Pinto’s Percentage somehow sounds somewhat like Ten on ten, but on a completely different topic. While the lyrics of the song had a huge scope of being better, the overall song somehow manages to sound okay.

Overall, in terms of music, F.A.L.T.U. does not literally characterizes its name, but is not on the opposite end either. While for a comedy songs are not too bad, in certain place there is a lot to be done. While there is not much new, songs like char baj gaye and awaaz are worth a try.

Beera: Raavan (Vijay Prakash)

Mani Ratnam. A R Rahman. Gulzar. Vijay Prakash. And Abhishek Bachchan. Here is the first video of Raavan, Beera ke dus maathe, beera ke sau naam.

The video is certainly worth a watch and Abhishek is looking different again, though Aishwarya in water reminds me of Guru again. The song is definitely good and I am hopeful about the music that is coming on April 24th. Here is the video.

Raavan: Soundtrack

So finally Mani Ratnam’s Raavan is here. Or so it will be, on April 24th, when Rahman’s music is out. Abhishek Bachchan can be seen in the video of Beera sets up a high expectation from the album, as well as the movie. Here is the soundtrack listing of the movie as found yet.

Behene De – Karthik
Beera Beera – Vijay Prakash
Kata Kata – Ila Arun, Sapna Awasthi & Kunal Ganjawala
Khilli Re – Reena Bhardwaj
Ranjha Ranjha – Rekha Bhardwaj & Javed Ali
Thok De Killi – Sukhwinder Singh

So hopes from the songs of Raavan are high. Check the video of the first song Beera too.

Click: Music Review

Doorie….

Yup, Click starts exactly on the same note as Shamir Tandon’s first composition Rubaayi starts exactly like Atif’s Doorie even though it changes its path early. The song though is good, and all singers, especially Sunidhi sound well. Lyrics of the song are slightly better than average for a usual love song. Overall, other than Atif effect the opening song of Click is not bad.
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