Shirin Farhad ki Toh Nikal Padi: Music Review (Jeet Ganguli)

Shirin Farhad ki To Nikal Padi Music ReviewJeet Ganguli has been in Bollywood on and off. But since Jeet-Pritam’s separation, he’s not been in the top rated movies. After a long time, he gets to compose for Shirin Farhad ki To Nikal Padi, which, depsite its irregular star cast, should be a big one. And Jeet plays his part right here. Here is a review.

Ishq mein tere bina dil hi na lage. The opening song of the album is a regular romantic number, with a lovely melody, and KK and Shreya singing. The song sounds a lot like those of 1990s-2000s, and sounds good, something that we are not getting to see a lot these days. Good singers, good composition and a nice romantic track. And still a little rare today, that’s what the song is.

The second song, Khatti Meethi, again maintains the melody quotient, while adding some nicer vocals from Shreya as she goes on to sing again. The other feature of the song is Amitabh Bhattacharya’s lyrics with lot of English words, but still keeping them from making the song anything other than natural. You get to hear ‘mausamon mein feel hai’ instead of ‘mausamon mein ehsaas hai’, something a person is more likely to say today. This may be start of something new.

The sad part is that Urdu is leaving us, and English is coming in, but then that’s exactly what is happening in our daily lives and the good part is that the song does it without going overboard. I’d say, good work by Amitabh here.

The next song of the album, Kaafir Andhere, is a treat for music lovers. The song is a love ballad, sad, a little rocky, and sung perfectly by KK. The lyrics of the song are good, as one can expect from Amitabh. The only negative, the song seems to have a hangover of ‘Jaane kyun tanha ho gaye’ of Bhram. Other than that, it’s just lovely.

And yeah, this one kind of makes up for the loss of Urdu out there.

Shirin Farhad ki Toh Nikal Padi. I love this title song. For two reasons. One, this gives something different to the album, something that is prevalent in the market today, and Jeet does it nothing less than Pritam or say, Sohail. And two, I love the simple, very slightly philosophical, but feel-good lyrics. OK, maybe I said a bit too much for the lyrics, but the song is nice. And makes me feel I should watch the movie. Me.

Guitars. Kuku duku. Again a little hangover’ish from here n there, but the sounds are nice, and until Mohit Chauhan enters with the strange, monologue’ish, ’90s type lyrics, you expect a nice romantic number. The good part is even with the comic-romantic lyrics, you like the song, just that it’s not a blockbuster. But nice. Especially for the movie.

Ramba mein Samba by Usha Uthhup has got some nice music, or I should say interesting music, as there were many other songs that fit the words ‘nice’ better. But the fusion of Electronic, Dhol and Spanish background vocals is something that gives a good feel. I like.

Overall, SFKTNP is an album with a lot of melody, something we don’t get a lot nowadays, some good lyrics, with some regular, nice tracks, and a little experimentation and some light comedy thrown in. I don’t think I could have asked for lot more flavors here. Welcome back, Jeet.

Don 2: Music Review (Shankar Ehsaan Loy)

So Farhan Akhtar makes SRK do a Salman in Don 2.

Well, I am not talking about acting, but like almost every Salman film, this time SRK starts the soundtrack of Don 2 with a dialog, that merges into the second track, Zaraa Dil ko thaam lo, beautifully sung by Vishal Dadlani and Anusha Mani. I mean Shankar Ehsaan Loy this time get a voice that sounds like that of a Don instead of Shaan, who sounded all nice, not too fit for a Don I’d say. The melody is nice even though SEL keep the arrangements much as in the previous Don. Nice start.

The thing that most interested me, however, was Usha Uthup’s mysterious voice singing na koi raat hai, na koi din yahaan, to start hai ye maaya. Shankar Ehsaan Loy come up with a nice melody again, though the arrangements have been kept very espionage-y, reminding me of Karthik calling Karthik where this job was entitled to Midival Punditz. Totally like. Precisely, it’s ‘more than background.’

Continue reading “Don 2: Music Review (Shankar Ehsaan Loy)”

7 Khoon Maaf: Music Review: Saat Khoon Maaf

Vishal Bhardwaj is here again.

Well, Darling, the Russian connection of Vishal Bhardwaj is definitely a well composed, well sung piece and similarities as well as differences from Kalinka are quite beautifully done. While Vishal gets the music catchy and haunting, Rekha Bharadwaj sings the song once again with a new touch to her voice. But the voice that gets it the best there is that of Usha Uthup. Kudos to Vishal for using her voice with such precision. The last word on the song: Daaaarrrrrling…

Bekaraan hain bekaraan, aankhein band keeje na, doobne lage hain hum, saans lene deeje na. Well, if I tell you that the song is sung by Vishal Bhardwaj, you’d probably be able to even guess the tune. I mean, so very predictable, and predictably lovely and beautiful too.

Vishal Bhardwaj is back. From the days of Paanch. Yeah, Vishal gets KK back after years, and for something similar. KK rocks in this one, and though Vishal rocks, the slight negative is that like other songs of the album, you have something to compare with it already. This time I was thinking about Sar jhuka khuda hoon main while listening to the song. But then, khuda hoon main didn’t have Gulzar. The lines here are just awesome in some places. Like Gulzar. After all, he can rock too.

Awaara Awaara Awaara. Master Salim sings this one for Vishal and comes up with one of the best things of the album. The music, the words, and the depth in Saleem’s voice go along, making it an experience worth experiencing. Interestingly while the song reminds me of albela sajan ghar aayo re, it also reminds me of Naina and Rahat Fateh Ali Khan. And the greatness of the two songs is proof enough to how good the song would be. Na shaakh jude, na jad pakde, mausam mausam banjara.. aawara awara awaara.

The next in the album comes Suresh Wadkar’s solo Tere Liye. The six minute song is definitely a piece of poetry more than a song. Quite typical, but anybody who listens to the song probably knows in advance what it’s gonna be and expects it to be precisely what it is. Humne to parindon se, baagon ke saude kiye, tere liye. Yes. It’s all Gulzar.

Dil dil hai dil dil hai dil hai dil, Suraj Jagan, and Rock. Well, Vishal Bhardwaj completely goes into Paanch mode with raw rock as he composes dil dil hai. I won’t say it’s similar to any song, but just reminds me that if an average composer can compose in N genres Vishal Bhardwaj can do it in N square.

Rekha’s Yeshu is definitely NOT what I was expecting it to be. A prayer, that somehow doesn’t sound that heartfelt, and somehow gets a bit boring too, but then the song sounds fine, and maybe even good for the times when you actually want to listen to it.

The next in the album is Doosri Darling, which comes up with the original darling, that is Kalinka-Kalinka-Malinka-Moya. In case you don’t yet know, the song Darling is based on a Russian folkish song of 1860s, Kalinka. Actually this is the one you have been listening to in the promos.

Overall, Vishal Bhardwaj is as good as ever in 7 Khoon Maaf, but then, a little disappointment comes from the fact that there is nothing as new as was there in Ishqiya, or even Kaminey. Still, there is quality, and this time, some quantity too.

Oh, did you notice there is no Sukhwinder Singh in a Vishal Bharadwaj album, after years?