Jo Dooba So Paar, It’s Love in Bihar: Music Review

Of course, the movie is supposed to be interesting and so is the music in case of Jo Dooba So Paar, It’s Love in Bihar, if you have seen the promo even once. Here is a review of the album, composed by Manish J Tipu.

The album starts with Tochi Raina and Pia Sukanya’s Shiv ka baaje damru. The song, which is supposed to be romantic, has been added some linguistic elements which can make you laugh too, like ‘chanda bhi kankhi se dekhe tujhe, kudrat ka khela hai tu full too.’ The music and arrangements are simple but powerful and suit the settings of the movie.

The next song, Raghubir Yadav’s Andey garam garam is a satire with the basic tune of Andey garam garam going on that of Vande Mataram. The lyrics of the song, which are probably the most important thing here, are quite interesting, and in places quite thought-provoking. In short, even though this one is not as straightforward from the first line as Mehngai Dayan was, I’d say the song is bang on.

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Hum Tum Shabana: Music Review (Sachin-Jigar)

The first song, Music Bandh na karo, is on the lines of party abhi baaki hai, but not that good. Still an okay one, should work fine as a party number.

The next, Hey na na na Shabana is an interesting one, Raghav’s voice is well used by Sachin-Jigar and the music is kinda catchy. Not too fast, not slow, and the comic-ish video would help the song for sure. Liked it.

Mika and Suzanne’s Thank you Mr DJ is slow, with good beats, and will be highly addictive. Perfect material for parties, and if not, there will be remixes, of course.

Anushka Manchanda and Jigar come for the next track, Piya Kesariyo. The song is a bit like its name, in terms of vocals, but the background is all rock and quite lovely as the rock here is slow again. Anushka is a good choice of voice for this one. Like.

The last original number of the album is Tochi Raina’s kaari kaari, where he gets all high, somewhat like in Gal mitthi mitthi, though the music is not ‘that’ dancy, but the song is anyway lovely.

Overall, in Hum Tum Shabana all the songs are good and like all Sachin Jigar albums in the past some time (read FALTU and Shor), have some good amount of freshness as well. Do try the album.

Update: Seems people are offended by the words ‘nothing too very great.’ Or more than that, when I read the review later, even I found the words a bit on the negative side, not really something I intended to do. Hence changed them.

Mausam (2011): Music Review (Pritam)

13 tracks. 6 original songs. 11 singers. With some singing more than one song and some songs getting different singers for different versions. In short, Pritam does his best to create a full mix and match combination, and the results seem pretty good. There we go with a review.

Rabba main to mar gaya oye. Shahid Mallya. A nice song with lovely, romantic lyrics and Shahid Mallya’s slightly husky voice goes quite well with the light music of the song with a little Punjabi touch. Good start.

The second song may remind you of thoda thoda pyaar with its video and initial arrangements, but once Mika gets into singing saj dhaj ke tashan mein rehna, you know it’s a typical Mika thing where you can lose yourself and dance like mad. I may be biased here, but I kinda loved Pankaj Kapur’s single line entry here.

Next comes Hans Raj Hans with ik tu hi tu hi, a sad song which not only boasts of some nice arrangements and lovely use of chorus (should I say a bit Rahman’ish), but also some beautiful lyrics from Irshad Kamil. Do listen to this one. I am wondering at how composers are turning to Hans raj Hans for serious stuff like this one or rather how it didn’t happen much earlier.

The next treat comes from Rashid Khan who sounds in his full color as he sings Poore se zara sa kam hain. I must applaud Pritam here for giving Rashid full command over the song as the latter sings without any background for the first minute and later also goes in a very Indian arrangement. Another good thing, you find no adulterated (politically correct: remixed) versions of the song. Do listen.

Karsan Sargathiya’s aag lage us aag ko has more than a touch of folk, especially with Dholi Taaro man Karsan’s singing. Okay this one.

Hard Kaur’s entry in the serious album sounds a bit sudden/strange/abrupt, but soon Tochi Raina takes over with an almost new avatar as he sings Mallo Malli naal yaar de, a lovely Punjabi dance number for the youth to dance on. Not a very mature song going by the standard of the album yet, but still quite interesting and listenable, or should I say danceable.

After the original songs start remixes, reprises and more. First one, Rabba, with Rahat here. Needless to say, the version is nice, but I was equally ok with Shahid Mallya’s version. In fact with nothing special for/by Rahat here, I’d prefer Shahid’s version.

After Singh is Kinng, Tiger style come in to remix for Mika’s Saj Dhaj ke, in a desi mix and a club mix, both of which don’t sound too great, but are good for dancing at parties.

Next comes a reprise version of ik tu hi tu, which is sung by Shahid Mallya this time, and the guy kind of impresses me, as he sounds as good as Hans Raj Hans did for the song. But what is a surprise here is the next version of the song, sung by Wadali Brothers. The Mehfil Mix sounds nice and quite different from the original. But then again, do not compare with Rangrez.

At the end there are two versions of Mallo Malli, which are sung by Lehember Hussainpuri with Hard Kaur and Tochi Raina alone respectively, which look a bit too much as so many repetitions were probably not required.

Overall Mausam is a really nice album from Pritam with at least four songs out of six in the ‘very good’ category. While almost the entire album seems to have a Punjabi touch, there is still variety in the songs, and not only in terms of singers used. So my verdict is: buy it, listen to it.

Lyrics from MAUSAM

Bhindi Bazaar Inc. Music Review (Sandeep Surya)

The album opens with Akkad Bakkad sung by Suraj Jagan. The song is a parody of many things and almost every word in the song seems to remind of something or the other. Though, interestingly, the song sounds new even with pieces from Kishore Kumar’s songs to what not.

The next, maaldaar ki jeb, is more interesting in its singing and lyrics more than anything else. Tochi Raina, the man who has sung some wonderful songs, sings this one in a different style. A second different in a row.

After two ‘different’ songs, a classical sounding aa ja re piya is definitely music to ears. Well sung by Sandeep Goswami and Shweta Pandit, the song almost reminds me of kaare kaare badra of Mirch in the way it’s arranged, though Shankar Mahadevan was an added advantage in the latter. Anyway, a worth listening to song.

The next comes Taan ke Seena which is sung by Shibani Kashyap in her well known style, but the lyrics of the song are a bit on the other side, more of real-life lyrics instead of her more common-popular romantic ones. Okay, but probably Sunidhi could be a better choice for this one.

The last song of the album, Kitni Baatein, sung by Roop Kumar Rathod is a deeply sad one and Roop seems drowned in the depths of the song right from the start. A good, but very slow and quite sad number, that is not for everyone. Should work well as a background song in the movie.

Overall, Bhindi Bazaar is not really a musical, but the songs are good enough to be liked at least in the movie. Most of the songs have an instant appeal, especially the first two ‘different’ ones. If you like to check out new things, I’d say it’s worth a try.

Shor in the City: Music Review

Dheere Dheere, jiya ko dheere dheere, apna sa laage hai saibo. Sachin-Jigar are once again here to prove themselves, and this time they use the voices of Shreya Ghoshal and Tochi Raina to prove their point.

The first song of the album called ‘Shor in the City’ is definitely not shor of city. Shreya starts the song in her soft voice with a light Punjabi accent and then Tochi almost adds a new life to it. The variation in terms of instruments is something to watch out for in the song. Wonderful use of Indian instruments in between so many western ones while Sachin-Jigar keep the melody simple. Delighting.

The next song, though, more talks like Shor. Karma is a bitch sung by Suraj Jagan, Priya and Swati is more of an experimental one and gives a feeling of Robot in some places, the way it is arranged. The Hindi rap (karma khula saand) and dera-dam-dam-dam-da are some good parts. With some publicity and a good video, the song may pick up well.

Shor, sung by the strong-voiced but much unkown singer Mohan, is yet another track to be heard. Like all other songs of him, this one again has some inspiring lyrics and even the song is not a ‘naav,’ it’s worth a try. If I say the song reminds me of Indian Ocean, you may be a bit too high on expectations, so I’d leave the comment and just recommend you the song without much specifications.

The next comes Dheem Dheem Tana, which is sung by Shriram Iyer, is yet another ‘different’ song with some Hindi rapping, in some places with Sanskrit tatsam words, the song has some good vocals and arrangements too, but somehow it doesn’t leave much impact. Okay stuff.

The album also has a remix of Saibo and Roop Kumar Rathod’s teri justajoo, Agnee’s Ujale Baaz and Kailasa’s Babam bam babam as bonus tracks.

Overall, Sachin-Jigar and Harpreet’s Shor in the City has some good songs and Dheere Dheere and Shor leave an impact. Do try this one.

Gal Mitthi Mitthi Bol – Aisha (Tochi Raina)

After Dev.D, Amit Trivedi composes his next Punjabi song for Aisha. This time the song is sung by his favorite, singer of Pardesi and Iktara male version, Tochi Rainaa. The song is a not-so-fast dance number and instantly reminds you of Dev.D’s Punjabi numbers though the songs in Dev.D were sung by Labh Janjua. Anyway, the song is good and here are the lyrics of the song.

Gal mitthi mitthi bol, Bajne de taashe dhol..

Gal mitthi mitthi bol, ras kaano vich ghol
Bajne de taashe dhol, masti mein tu vi dol
Mann de naina tu khol
Chahat ke moti rol
Dil hunda ae anmol, ke daulat se na tol
Aa sohni tenu chaand ki main choodi pehrawa
Mainu kar de ishaara te main doli lai aanwa
Gal mitthi mitthi bol, ras kaano vich gol
Bajne de taashe dhol, masti mein tu vi dol
Continue reading “Gal Mitthi Mitthi Bol – Aisha (Tochi Raina)”

Aisha: Music Review

Amit Trivedi is here again. I was not even done with listening to his awesome Udaan, when he came back with Aisha. The good thing is that unlike Udaan, Aisha is not all typical Amit Trivedi in his favorite rock mood, but much more versatility. In fact with the present variety, you may count it as, something like half a Dev.D.

The first song of the album is Suno Aisha, which is a peppy number with some light, likeable experiments with instruments. The song that falls almost in line with Vishal-Shekhar’s Jaane Kyun and Jab mila tu, sounds different also because of the soft voices. By the way, with Amit Trivedi and more, the song even has Ash King, the guy who sang Dil gira daffatan for Rahman last year in Delhi 6.

The next song is the Punjabi piece, Gal Mitthi Mithi Bol, sung by Tochi Raina, the ‘Pardesi’ boy. The song is a hardcore Punjabi one with slow beats and quite carrying the flavor of Dev.D’s Punjabi songs.

The next song, Shaam, is a slow-soft, quite typical Amit Trivedi thing. When listening to the song for the first few times, you may think the song would go into rock mode but Amit n Neuman Pinto keep rendering the soulful lyrics of Javed Akhtar in a soft but typical mode of theirs. Reminds me of Aamir’s songs. Whatever it be, I love the boom boom boom para.

The fourth song of the album is Behke Behke, sung by Anushka Manchanda, Raman Mahadevan and Samrat. The song is a dance number with a touch of music that sounds somewhere between Caribbean and Arabic and even Goan to me. The song even reminds me of Honeymoon Travels’ Pyaar ki ye Kahani. Maybe I’m losing the genre but the whole point is the song is different, and good. Likeable stuff for sure. And some good singing by Anushka.

And the next song is Magic. O no, the name of the song is Lehrein, but the song has almost created a spell on me in the first few listenings only. Awesome singing by Anusha Mani again on some slow, soulful music and some touching lyrics by Javed Akhtar. I guess the best song of the album, and probably with this one, Amit Trivedi-Javed Akhtar will be able to recreate the magic of Iktara. Lovable.

By the way/tumse keh denge sung by Anushka Manchanda with Neuman Pinto is a fast paced dance number that doesn’t really sound like Amit Trivedi from any corner. The song is well sung by Anushka and the way she speaks in between, she reminds me of Aye Bachhu sung by Suzanne D’mello. Good but not great.

Besides, the album has two remixes, of Gal Mitthi Mitthi and Lehrein. The remix of Gal Mitthi is a common Punjabi song remix while Lehrein has got a lonuge mix that sounds pretty good.

Overall, Amit Trivedi has come up with some variety this time, thus bringing soemthing for those who said he was making only rock-ish songs after Dev.D. Must listen.

And yes, if you want to have my opinion on the best song, it’s simple I guess. Lehrein aayin, lehron mein beh gaye.