Jo Hum Chahein: Music Review (Sachin Gupta)

Sachin Gupta, the man behind Ehsaan itna sa kar de and Prince, is here again, with his new album, Jo Hum Chahein. Here is a review of the album.

The album starts with Aaj bhi Party sung by Suraj Jagan, which impresses with its sound from the very beginning. Yet another party song, Aaj bhi party is based on a nice tune and the sound of the song has been well worked on. Suraj Jagan once again does well.

The second song of the album, Ishq hothon se to hota nahi bayaan is a nice surprise from KK and Shreya Ghoshal, that goes a little in the ‘Ehsaan’ way, without the high notes. I mean, the song is a really soulful number with lovely lyrics and soft music on a nice melody, but the background has some rock’ish effects here and there. Well fused. Do listen.

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Mujhse Fraaandship Karoge: Music Review (Raghu Dixit)

Welcome to Bollywood, Mr Project. (For the uninitiated, Raghu Dixit is the only guy I know whose band is called Project. Hence the loving name.)

Dhaeon Dhaeon sung by Vishal Dadlani and Aditi Singh Sharma is addictive, and still it’s not what you call come n go. Nice.

Ash King and Shilpa Rao’s Uh-oh-uh-oh kya hua is something to love. The music, especially the orchestration of the song sounds quite simple, but I don’t think many people can do it this nicely. Beautiful job by the composer, as well as both the singers. DO listen.
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Delhi Belly: Music Review (Ram Sampath)

Delhi Belly starts with Bhaag Bhaag DK Bose DK Bose DK Bhaag. And you must by now know how well the song is ‘running.’ LOVE this one. Nothing more to say. Can just praise Amitabh Bhattacharya and Ram Sampath for the masterpiece of its own kind they have created.

If you thought Bhaag Bhaag DK Bose was going to be the only highlight of Delhi Belly, you might be in for a surprise. The second song, Nakkadwaley Disco Udhaarwale Khisko is not on very different lines, though it doesn’t create such punny situations as the earlier one. Still, teri tirchhi nazar ne dil ko kar diya pancher is some really innovative use of Kirti Sagathia’s voice. And so is the song. Innovative, only two steps behind Emosanal Attyachar.

The next number, Saigal Blues, sung by Chetan Shashital, is almost clear by its name. The song is almost a clear cut copy of KL Saigal’s singing, with some twist, that will make the song run longer in this age.

The next song of the album is finally a little less into fun though it’s not all serious. Ram Sampath gets an item-ish Bedardi Raja for his wife, Sona Mahapatra. Okay composition, well sung.

The next number again has a name that would get people interested. Suraj Jagan sings this slightly espionage-y, very rocky Ja Chudail. Suraj almost does a Zehreelay Zehreelay with Chudail, but with the lyrics it has, the song is bound to be funny. I smell Dev.D to some extent, but not exactly in that way.

Ram Sampath comes up to sing the next normal and probably the first and only romantic number of the album, Tere Siva, with Tarannum Malik. The song has a slight ’90s touch though the song is very likable and lovely, something that has been seen in some other Ram Sampath songs too, I feel. Well composed, well sung, with a nice end.

Switty Switty Switty tera pyaar chahida. Sung by Kirti Sagathia. The song might not sound completely new as one can find some similar sounding songs before, in pieces, but the song as Ram and Kirti have made it is a bit different. A completely ‘Delhi’ sounding song, it has Sufi’ish touches (NO, this is NOT a Sufi song), a-very-Punjabi-mixed-Delhi’ish language, and that will (read chipku’ish-ness). The song should work well with this movie, though I’d see no future for this one in a normal movie I guess.

The next song, tere pyaar ne kar diya deewana/ I hate you like I love you is a beautifully confused song. The song starts in a good qawwali mood and shifts to almost a cheerleader song (rock n roll?). But the mixing is well done and in a way that it only makes the song interesting. Kudos to Ram Sampath for the composition and even Amitabh for writing this one.

And then, if the original tracks weren’t enough, there is a ‘punk’ version of Switty, sung by Kirti and Ram Sampath himself, though I liked the original more, as that one had taken me by more surprise.

Overall, Delhi Belly is what you had wanted it to be after that first trailer and that first song. There is still nothing better in the album, nor the album is what you’d say ‘musical,’ but then still for the album I’d say Go get it. Or in other words, bhaag bhaag!

Bhindi Bazaar Inc. Music Review (Sandeep Surya)

The album opens with Akkad Bakkad sung by Suraj Jagan. The song is a parody of many things and almost every word in the song seems to remind of something or the other. Though, interestingly, the song sounds new even with pieces from Kishore Kumar’s songs to what not.

The next, maaldaar ki jeb, is more interesting in its singing and lyrics more than anything else. Tochi Raina, the man who has sung some wonderful songs, sings this one in a different style. A second different in a row.

After two ‘different’ songs, a classical sounding aa ja re piya is definitely music to ears. Well sung by Sandeep Goswami and Shweta Pandit, the song almost reminds me of kaare kaare badra of Mirch in the way it’s arranged, though Shankar Mahadevan was an added advantage in the latter. Anyway, a worth listening to song.

The next comes Taan ke Seena which is sung by Shibani Kashyap in her well known style, but the lyrics of the song are a bit on the other side, more of real-life lyrics instead of her more common-popular romantic ones. Okay, but probably Sunidhi could be a better choice for this one.

The last song of the album, Kitni Baatein, sung by Roop Kumar Rathod is a deeply sad one and Roop seems drowned in the depths of the song right from the start. A good, but very slow and quite sad number, that is not for everyone. Should work well as a background song in the movie.

Overall, Bhindi Bazaar is not really a musical, but the songs are good enough to be liked at least in the movie. Most of the songs have an instant appeal, especially the first two ‘different’ ones. If you like to check out new things, I’d say it’s worth a try.

Shor in the City: Music Review

Dheere Dheere, jiya ko dheere dheere, apna sa laage hai saibo. Sachin-Jigar are once again here to prove themselves, and this time they use the voices of Shreya Ghoshal and Tochi Raina to prove their point.

The first song of the album called ‘Shor in the City’ is definitely not shor of city. Shreya starts the song in her soft voice with a light Punjabi accent and then Tochi almost adds a new life to it. The variation in terms of instruments is something to watch out for in the song. Wonderful use of Indian instruments in between so many western ones while Sachin-Jigar keep the melody simple. Delighting.

The next song, though, more talks like Shor. Karma is a bitch sung by Suraj Jagan, Priya and Swati is more of an experimental one and gives a feeling of Robot in some places, the way it is arranged. The Hindi rap (karma khula saand) and dera-dam-dam-dam-da are some good parts. With some publicity and a good video, the song may pick up well.

Shor, sung by the strong-voiced but much unkown singer Mohan, is yet another track to be heard. Like all other songs of him, this one again has some inspiring lyrics and even the song is not a ‘naav,’ it’s worth a try. If I say the song reminds me of Indian Ocean, you may be a bit too high on expectations, so I’d leave the comment and just recommend you the song without much specifications.

The next comes Dheem Dheem Tana, which is sung by Shriram Iyer, is yet another ‘different’ song with some Hindi rapping, in some places with Sanskrit tatsam words, the song has some good vocals and arrangements too, but somehow it doesn’t leave much impact. Okay stuff.

The album also has a remix of Saibo and Roop Kumar Rathod’s teri justajoo, Agnee’s Ujale Baaz and Kailasa’s Babam bam babam as bonus tracks.

Overall, Sachin-Jigar and Harpreet’s Shor in the City has some good songs and Dheere Dheere and Shor leave an impact. Do try this one.

Zokkomon: Music Review (Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy)

Creating music for a children’s movie is definitely not a child’s play. Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy compose here for Darsheel Safary starrer Zokkomon. Here is a review.

The album opens with an Eena Meena Myna Mo sung by Yashmita Sharma. Quite an experimental tune, Eena Meena Myna Mo has touches of earlier works of the trio, but the song is quite fresh and Yashmita Sharma has certainly sung it beautifully. And the lyrics made me go back to the credits once again. Yes, it’s Javed Akhtar. Good one to start with.

The next, Suraj Jagan’s rocky, uplifting Suno Brother somehow seems potent to fit in a children’s movie. I guess SEL did something similar in Taare Zameen Par with Bheja Kam as well, but then the 3 minute track here is not so much rock as was Bheja Kam, and is kinda less experimental. An okay song, well sung by Suraj.

The title song Zokkomon has two versions. While the four plus minutes’ version is wonderfully sung by Shankar and does sound good with its slightly uplifting lyrics and part zealous-part beatful music, the smaller version sounds more like a background piece. Not too good, but the longer version is worth a try.

The next song, jhumjhunmakadstrma (no, I didn’t copy-paste), is sung by Kailash Kher, and while the song reminds me of Jajantaram-Mamantaram with its name, the song is a lovely tune with some easy on ear beats. Kailash Kher may not seem like such a good idea for a children’s song, but he does a wonderful work there. After all, Raghubir Yadav has done so much story-telling and singing for children with a similar kind of voice. Do try this one if you are interested in children’s songs.

Darsheel Safary, Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy and Shaan. Anyone would think of Bum Bum Bole, but then if that was your thought, you may be in for a slight disappointment as you listen to tum bin ye dil ghabraye. This one from Shaan is a slow, soft, slightly sad song, which I guess is way too slow for a children’s movie, even though the song has quality. Do try this one without thinking of the movie. Nice, but probably a misfit, at least until I watch the movie.

Overall, Zokkomon is a nice try by Shankar Ehsaan Loy, a try at that tough thing that is to create music for a children’s movie. But then it’s much better than the music that is offered by most of the children’s movies coming up today. I’m not too hopeful from the movie, but this standard of music certainly gives the movie some edge over other children’s movies and there is at least some hope building up.

7 Khoon Maaf: Music Review: Saat Khoon Maaf

Vishal Bhardwaj is here again.

Well, Darling, the Russian connection of Vishal Bhardwaj is definitely a well composed, well sung piece and similarities as well as differences from Kalinka are quite beautifully done. While Vishal gets the music catchy and haunting, Rekha Bharadwaj sings the song once again with a new touch to her voice. But the voice that gets it the best there is that of Usha Uthup. Kudos to Vishal for using her voice with such precision. The last word on the song: Daaaarrrrrling…

Bekaraan hain bekaraan, aankhein band keeje na, doobne lage hain hum, saans lene deeje na. Well, if I tell you that the song is sung by Vishal Bhardwaj, you’d probably be able to even guess the tune. I mean, so very predictable, and predictably lovely and beautiful too.

Vishal Bhardwaj is back. From the days of Paanch. Yeah, Vishal gets KK back after years, and for something similar. KK rocks in this one, and though Vishal rocks, the slight negative is that like other songs of the album, you have something to compare with it already. This time I was thinking about Sar jhuka khuda hoon main while listening to the song. But then, khuda hoon main didn’t have Gulzar. The lines here are just awesome in some places. Like Gulzar. After all, he can rock too.

Awaara Awaara Awaara. Master Salim sings this one for Vishal and comes up with one of the best things of the album. The music, the words, and the depth in Saleem’s voice go along, making it an experience worth experiencing. Interestingly while the song reminds me of albela sajan ghar aayo re, it also reminds me of Naina and Rahat Fateh Ali Khan. And the greatness of the two songs is proof enough to how good the song would be. Na shaakh jude, na jad pakde, mausam mausam banjara.. aawara awara awaara.

The next in the album comes Suresh Wadkar’s solo Tere Liye. The six minute song is definitely a piece of poetry more than a song. Quite typical, but anybody who listens to the song probably knows in advance what it’s gonna be and expects it to be precisely what it is. Humne to parindon se, baagon ke saude kiye, tere liye. Yes. It’s all Gulzar.

Dil dil hai dil dil hai dil hai dil, Suraj Jagan, and Rock. Well, Vishal Bhardwaj completely goes into Paanch mode with raw rock as he composes dil dil hai. I won’t say it’s similar to any song, but just reminds me that if an average composer can compose in N genres Vishal Bhardwaj can do it in N square.

Rekha’s Yeshu is definitely NOT what I was expecting it to be. A prayer, that somehow doesn’t sound that heartfelt, and somehow gets a bit boring too, but then the song sounds fine, and maybe even good for the times when you actually want to listen to it.

The next in the album is Doosri Darling, which comes up with the original darling, that is Kalinka-Kalinka-Malinka-Moya. In case you don’t yet know, the song Darling is based on a Russian folkish song of 1860s, Kalinka. Actually this is the one you have been listening to in the promos.

Overall, Vishal Bhardwaj is as good as ever in 7 Khoon Maaf, but then, a little disappointment comes from the fact that there is nothing as new as was there in Ishqiya, or even Kaminey. Still, there is quality, and this time, some quantity too.

Oh, did you notice there is no Sukhwinder Singh in a Vishal Bharadwaj album, after years?

Patiala House: Music Review (Shankar Ehsaan Loy)

Laung da Lishkara is something that is definitely going to be a hit. A beautifully created Punjabi song by Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy. The not-too-fast pace of the song is lovely, and how you still don’t want it to be fast and furious is the quality of the music here. The main singer, Jassi seems like a new voice here.

The next, Kyun Main Jaagoon by Shafqat Amanat Ali Khan maybe a bit too slow for loving it the first time, but as you listen to it, you love it more and more. A beautiful track with the background music that slowly grows inside the track. The unplugged version of the song is equally good. Oh, pain in Shafaqat’s voice sounds so very natural in here.

Mehndi vi mehndi, mehndi vi mehndi. Gaadha rang je chadhiya te balle ve balle. I am reminded of Kal ho naa ho. And then of Ajab Prem ki Gazab Kahani as Hard Kaur comes in, and then Shankar Mahadevan sounds all in mad-dance mode. Well, the song sounds a bit broken at the start, but once you’re used to it, the song is definitely gonna rock you. Raula pai gaya. Raula pai gaya. Dil se gaya. Raula pai gaya.

Khwabon ke lifafon mein, kisson mein kitabon mein, Vishal Dadlani sings aadat hai woh in his soft-husky voice. Well, I was surprised quite pleasantly, but a bit confused too as to why Vishal was singing this, and then when I heard usko banane wala kuch kuch to behka hoga, I knew Vishal was the perfect singer for the song. Lovely music, superb lyrics, deep singing. Woh aadat hai is a song with some poetry. I loved it, probably the most in the album, almost as much as Kyun Main Jaagoon. Do listen.

Baby when you talk to me is one more song in the Bollywood rock. This one is sung by Suraj and the way he sings it, it reminds me of Sadka kiya, though the song is not much like that one. Simple tune, and very instantly likable.

The next song, Tumba Tumba tudak gaya, is a kinda slow Punjabi-mixed dance number which stands out for its simplicity. Hans Raj Hans does a beautiful job at this one. The song may not be the best thing when you listen to it the first time, but slowly it takes up its space in your head. Also, have hopes from the video of the video.

Kailash Kher. Richa Sharma. OK. Kailash isn’t here this time, but Richa Sharma sings the mukhda of the bhajan Kailash sang for Road to Sangam. Aval Allah. A small track for the background. Not the full bhajan though, sadly.

The next thing is the remix of kyun main jaagoon. I’m not much into remixes, but quite loved this one. Try once even if you don’t listen to remixes.

The last, baby when you talk to me remix isn’t bad either, probably because there are no huge changes made in the song and speed seems to be the same.

Oh, forgot Raula pai gaya remix. Totally enjoying it.

Overall, Patiala House may not be among the best of Shankar Ehsaan Loy, but like most of their albums, the album has some freshness, and some good ol’ things. To say the least, Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy, once again, don’t disappoint. 🙂

Payback: Music Review (Dev Sikdar)

Payback starts with Jaane Kab that almost starts with ‘Soniyo’ and follows up with Ashish Om’s Atif’ish voice, turning into a sweet and simple song going further. Even though the song has some clear traces from here and there as told, it doesn’t sound bad. So overall an okay song.

Dev Sikdar and Payal’s Jee le is a usual item’ish dance number, something like Neeyat Kharab hai, though below that standard. Passable.
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Jailhouse Rock: Death of an Immortal song

Jailhouse Rock was born on September 24, 1945. This hit of Elvis was written by Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller, and was on Rolling Stone’s list of 500 Greatest Songs of all times.

And now, Karan Johar buys this song for his remake of Stepmom and gets it almost killed by one of the country’s finest musicians, Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy. Oh, I do count them one. 🙂

Talking of the new version, it’s clear Kajol, Kareena and Arjun are shown trying to sing the song while they don’t remember the words from the song, as Kajol (actually Anushka Manchanda) says chalo hato pare nacho dil khol ke let’s rock, hello ji let’s rock, main to bhool gayi phir kya wordings the, something something Jailhouse Rock. Interestingly, while Anushka does the job of being causal perfectly (as shown in the video on Kajol), Suraj Jagan who has been a lot into rock a lot, and my thinking is, could well have been a big fan of Elvis, doesn’t get all that casual, as he seems to be giving his best to the song, result of which is that he doesn’t really sound casual unlike Anushka. Frankly, I did not like the song after the original version but still the best part of the song for me was where Suraj sings alone, especially where he says ‘yo mama let’s rock.’

And now, after saying such negative things about the song, I’ll tell you why this song will be a hit.

1. It’s a song in a Karan Johar movie with SEL’s music, so any relatively weak song would also have a chance of lasting much longer than it would have had in some other movie.
2. The music is still the same. The one that was there in one of World’s top 500 songs.
3. Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy know what they do. They might have made the song a bit irritating, but it certainly is very tongue sticking. Listen to it thrice and bingo! you’re humming it.

So don’t get irritated, nor try to get used to the song. It’ll be there on your tongue in some time, as long as you’re in contact with TV or radio.

PS: I don’t know how Akriti Kakkar seems to have gone a bit down in the song, most probably it’s Anushka who has been in too high a voltage to let me concentrate much on Akriti’s voice.

Jail House Rock

And Karan Johar’s next song arrives. OK, not Karan Johar’s song, but his production’s next movie’s first song is out and here goes their first song, Dil khol ke let’s rock which is actually a version of Elvis Presley’s 1957 song JailHouse rock. Thus, Karan Johar and Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy go a step ahead from Pretty Woman which was a 1990’s movie. I need not think twice to guess that Karan would have got the rights for this one too.

It’s another matter that I didn’t like the song so much as the original one, even though I’m not a big fan of Elvis. Probably I didn’t like the voice of Anushka in the song (I hope it’s her) and for sure I don’t think Kajol and Kareena go with that rock voice right after Lata and Alka and Shreya Ghoshal. Still, if the song exists in a Karan Johar movie, it has to be a hit, and however liked or disliked by me, a song can never be not worth a hear if it comes from Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy, and that too one that was made by Elvis and that when it was listed on the 500 best songs ever.

Oh, btw, Suraj Jagan sounds good in the song.

Here is the video.

and if you want, here is the original JailHouse Rock from 1957. Colorized later, of course.

We are Family: Another similar soundtrack?

I love Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy. But when it comes to Karan Johar, I suddenly become skeptical. I know Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy have given some fabulous music for Karan’s movies from their first song together (Kal ho na ho, title), but somehow I think Karan doesn’t use the full potential of Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy and I think there are several proofs of it. Take any ‘different’ song of Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy and you know it’s not from a Dharma movie (Exceptions are invited).

Now that Karan Johar’s next product We are Family is coming, some of the details are coming out and I’m again getting a feeling that the music of the film will be same again. The typical that happens to be in his movies: one or two songs with a Sufi touch, one party song, like in a bar or something, maybe one philosophical, and quite surely a sad version, and definitely one theme. I think though that after MNIK, WAF also may have one rock-ish number as Suraj Jagan is there again.

For example, I know there is a song called Rehem-o-Karam in the movie and by the very words, I smell a Sufi song. Not that I don’t like Sufi songs but hasn’t he had enough of them in MNIK already? By the way, the song Rehem-o-Karam is sung by Vishal Dadlani along with Shankar Mahadevan. I wish Rehem-o-Karam turns out to be a rock number but chances look kind of bleak.

I know Karan knows what he is doing and I also know that the songs that come out will be wonderful, and at the same time hit, superhit. But I think this way, music loses, and at the end, we lose.

Anyway, all I can do for now is anticipate and guess, until the music release, which is reportedly scheduled for first week of August, though I was expecting end of July, guessing 28th. And all I wish is that I’m proved wrong, and KJo and SEL bring us the best music we have ever heard. Amen.

Update: Here is the detailed soundtrack of the movie.

  1. Ankhon Mein Neendein – Rahat Fateh Ali Khan, Shreya Ghoshal, Shankar Mahadevan (5:02)
  2. Dil Khol Ke Let’s Rock – Anushka Manchanda, Akriti Kakkar, Suraj Jagan (03:57)
  3. Reham O Karam – Vishal Dadlani, Shankar Mahadevan (05:47)
  4. Hamesha & Forever – Sonu Nigam, Shreya Ghoshal, Tara Waaliya (04:51)
  5. Sun Le Dua Yeh Aasmaan (Theme Slow Version) – Shankar Mahadevan (03:53)
  6. We Are Family (Theme) – Dominique Cerejo, Clinton Cerejo, Neuman Pinto, Vivienne Pocha (02:48)

Lafangey Parindey: Music Review (R Anandh)

It’s strange to see how Yash Raj Films suddenly picked an unknown composer called R Anandh for their new project Lafangey Parindey. Lafangey Parindey is the new movie of Pradeep Sarkar who has made Parineeta and Laaga Chunri mein Daag and this time moves to a totally different genre.

The album starts with a rock-ish title song sung by another newcomer called Rohit Sarkar. The song has a punch feel attached to it and Swanand Kirkire’s lyrics quite help that. Nothing great but the song certainly sounds good as a background in the promos. I think good promotion will make the song popular for at least some time, till the release or so.
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Sadka Kiya meaning

If you’re not much into Urdu, this one may bowl you over as Sadka/Sadqa has a meaning that doesn’t come easily from the song Sadka kiya. Sadka literally is ‘giving voluntarily in the name of God’. So the lines Sadqa kiya yoon ishq ka actually mean that the person in question has given love in such abundance that the one who takes, finds the giver whenever s/he bows his/her head.

Bit tough to understand, but that was the meaning I could get out of the lines.

Sadka Kiya – I Hate Luv Storys: Lyrics n More

Vishal-Shekhar have one of the kings of rock among themselves, one who is called for rock songs by so many composers in Bollywood. But then, Vishal-Shekhar themselves call upon Suraj Jagan to sing this song, so definitely the song had to be good. And so it is.

Well, Sadka kiya is not really a rock song, but it has its lower notes as well as higher notes, and Suraj sounds awesome singing sadka kiya yoon ishq ka. Mahalxmi gets to sing mostly the lower notes in the song and does play her part perfectly.

The best part of the song is that even the lyrics of the song are good, probably better than most other songs of the album. Especially the part of mukhda, Sadka kiya yoon ishq ka, ke sar jhuka jahan, deedar hua, is really good.

Here are the lyrics of the song. (Full meaning here)
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