Zanjeer Music Review

The opening song of the album, Chirantan Bhatt’s Hum Hain Mumbai ke Hero is an addictive tune. But the lyrics of the song are so bad that using Amitabh Bachchan and Pran’s voices in the same song sounds bad to the legends. Anyway, Mika’s singing in the song is better than Priyanka’s acting, who, as pointed in a GIF, gets almost …

See the GIF on next page. Or if you think Priyanka might be NSFW, well, skip to Page 3.

Matru ki Bijlee ka Mandola: Music Review (Vishal Bhardwaj)

Vishal. Means Big. So he is, and this time, so is the soundtrack. Literally and figuratively.

The man who brought us rock way back in 2003 and Kalinka in 2011 (as Darling) is this time here with a soundtrack of no less than twelve songs, ranging from Prem Dehati’s renderings to Zulu.

Of course, you get the taste of Gulzar’s pen in the album.

The album begins with the heard-by-everyone title track, that does nothing but makes you dance. There is a madness in the tune, and Gulzar’s lyrics maintain that madness. My guess is that you would have danced to it already. If not, do that, cuz you need not be a dancer to dance to this tune.

The second song of the album, Khamakha Nahi has a foreign element (I dunno which country really) in the beginning chorus, and then it gives you a taste of something like Bekaraan. The romantic track has some simple lyrics by Gulzar, which one can almost identify as his. Loved it.

Oye Boy Charlie, sung by Rekha with Shankar Mahadevan and Mohit is one lovely piece from the album. The song has an English title, desi Gulzar’ed lyrics, desi music and earthy voices. To top it all, the visuals are quite interesting with a comic element. Listen to it. Watch it.

The next track, Hatt Lootnewale, has some lyrics against oppression, and the music isn’t too attractive. But the song has got the best of the singers, as Sukhwinder Singh and Master Saleem, something that may change the listeners’ perception in due time. The popularity of the song will depend a lot on the story/picturization and publicity.

Next comes Shara-ra-ra. A small, one n a half minute track, sung by Prem Dehati. The song is a earthy track with the music, lyrics, and even the brass-band based arrangements being village type. However, this doesn’t sound like Piyush Mishra earthy. So, good, but not exceptionally so.

Badal Uthya ri Sakhi. That’s what the best song of the album is called. The track, sung by Rekha (and later by Prem Dehati in Reprise) is ma’am singing in a full classic-folk mood, with minimal music, and a Sitar ruling the background. The song is actually an old folk song from Haryana and quite popular there. So you know what it is. Do listen. And listen. And let it grow on you.

The joke was, after his debut in Mausam, this guy gets two songs in Vishal Bhardwaj’s Matru ki Bijlee ka Mandola. His name is Pankaj Kapur.

Pankaj sings the next two tracks of the album, which are fun, but would be enjoyed actually when the movie comes out, or at least the video comes out. Pankaj’s singing shows you one side of theatre artist that has hardly been touched by cinema. Try the tracks, or wait for the videos.

The next track is a first in India. It’s called Nomvula, and it’s Zulu music, sung by Umoja [Umoja means Unity in Swahili]. Even the lyrics of the song have been imported, without any Hindi/English being added to them. The music is nice, but I guess an adaptation, maybe something like Kalinka, would be better.

The end of the album comes with a reprise version of Badal Uthiya by Prem Dehati, and a small one for Lootnewale, sung by Sukhwinder. Badal Uthya is ‘almost’ as good as by Rekha, and Sukhwinder’s Lootnewale sounds a little more less noisy than the original version.

Overall, the album has a lot in terms of variety, and some tracks are wonderful; Khamakha, Oye Boy, and Badal Uthya to name the best. But then a few elements were missing too. Both the songs by Rekha are good, but Sukhwinder this time doesn’t seem to have got his fair share despite the number of tracks. When the album was over, I even missed Suresh Wadkar who’s been there for most of Vishal’s albums, including 7KM.

So yes, the album is good. Vishal has done some good work. And it’s worth listening to. But the thirst that came with the big size, isn’t quenched.

Ek Tha Tiger Music Review (Sohail Sen, Sajid-Wajid)

Should I start with Mashallah? Well, I think there is enough said about the song, and then everyone seems to have heard it, so let’s just say the song is probably going to be the weaker part of the album. Or maybe I can say the weakest, if Salman Bhai’s fans allow me to. Not because he’s wrong anywhere, cuz Sajid-Wajid HAVE given some good songs for him. How can I ever forget the small preview of Tere Mast Mast Do Nain I heard at IIFA. That number within seconds told us what a hit it was going to be. But then, this time they seem to have got it wrong. Not too wrong, but not as right as it has been earlier.

And I wrote again so much about that song. OK, leave that one. Let’s see others.

Sohail Sen’s part of the album begins with a KK song and the duo seem to maintain the rapport shared in their last album, Mere Brother ki Dulhan. KK here again plays the fast track, and sings a full fledged commercial number for Salman, this time with Shreya Ghoshal Palak Muchchal. The song, though not extraordinary as such, has a nice melody and the ‘main laapata‘ part is catchy as well. So be ready to hear many fans singing this one, and in due time, some non-fans too.

The next song of the album, Banjaara, is sung by Sukhwinder Singh. And will definitely be pictured on Salman Khan. That actually tells you a lot about the song. Let me spell it out a little more clearly. The song is full of energy, so much so that without even watching it, one can see Salman Khan dancing to the tune with full energy. This one is a hit.

Teri Meri Meri Teri Prem Kahani hai Naadan Parindey. Saiyyara Main Saiyaara. OK leave the name. Let’s just say there is a sad song sung by Mohit Chauhan for Salman Khan. Can there be a thing deadlier than this as of today? OK I may again be overselling it, but I would at least say that Saiyaara is the best song of the album. The song has a superb melody, touching lyrics, the singers are superb, be it Mohit or Tarannum Malik, and so is the singing. The orchestration is simple and beautiful. One cannot doubt about the presence of Salman Khan in the song. Basically there isn’t a thing that would leave me in doubt about the song, it just is going to be one of the best this year. The only minor hitch is that the lyrics of the song make me feel that the movie ‘may’ have a sad ending. Hope that isn’t the case. I want the Tiger to remain there.

And yeah, the Tiger Theme is something you have already heard a lot since the very first teaser trailer, most of it. So that one already makes a fan nostalgic, which is a little strange, but quite positive for the movie. Other than the heard part too, the theme has quite some shades and should work perfectly in the background, and once you have seen the movie, on the CD too.

So clearly, this Tiger is going to rock. As per the rumors, Salman may not be too happy about Sohail doing the score for the movie, but the result has come out really well, and Sajid-Wajid’s song turns out the not-so-good piece of the album. As for Sohail’s part, I’d just say, Mashallah.

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Agneepath: Music P-review (Ajay-Atul)

Check Full Review HERE.

The music of Agneepath is supposed to released in 10 days still, but the promotional tracks are out, somehow the thirty second previews were enough to make me write a review, based on promo track, so you can call it a preview as well.

Kamsin kamariya saali ik thumke se lakh maare, note hazaaron ke khulle chhutta karane aayi. Well, Chikni Chameli, featured on Katrina Kaif, is not just interesting with lyrics, its music is attractive and more than everything, Shreya Ghoshal’s singing is surprising. Gonna wait for the song.

Ajay-Atul. Roop Kumar Rathod. A song that says ‘sehme hue sapne mere haule haule angdaiyaan le rahe, thehre hue lamhe mere nayi nayi gehraiyaan le rahe, zindagi ne pehni hai muskaan.’ Seriously, do you need to know more? Again, I am waiting for the album! 😐

Deva Shree Ganesh is one song that is a little regular, probably because of the subject as well. Reminds me of Don’s bappa moriya, and probably not as zealous, but can’t be sure about the latter in a 30 second preview again.

What again beats me is Sonu Nigam’s Abhi mujh mein kahin. Sonu’s singing is getting worth songs after some long break it seems. Recently he sang a nice song in Lanka and now this. Lovely.

Shah ka Rutba sung by Sukhwinder seemed to be Dabangg pattern from the name, but the song has a different flavor and goes more in Azeem o shaan shehenshah in terms of lyrics, and the music is a little qawwali’ish. Not too great from the promo, but definitely a like.

Gun Gun Guna ye gaana re sung by Sunidhi Chauhan and Udit Narayan seems to be a break from Sunidhi’s recent series of (mostly average) item numbers, as the song sounds like a light number. Also, Udit Narayan, who does not feature in the promo track should be something to cheer as he is not generally seen in albums nowadays and lately I have started missing his voice to some extent.

So all in all, Agneepath looks like something that can be bought on the day it gets launched. I don’t think anyone’s going to be disappointed. And yes, Ajay-Atul are definitely here to stay.

For Full Review, Check HERE.

Singham: Music Review (Ajay-Atul)

Ajay-Atul might be a new name for an average Hindi music listener, but for those who are into Marathi music in the slightest, Ajay Gogavale and Atul Gogavale are definitely not new. After their smaller stints in Hindi movies like Viruddh, finally they are here in a popular, big budget typical Bollywood movie, Rohit Shetty’s Singham. And they seem good here as well.

The album starts with the title song, sung by none other than Sukhwinder Singh. Sukhiji, who has Omkara and Dabangg to his credits, gets even more serious here and the song does not only have a catchy title rhythm, but a good antara as well, giving us a quality title song. Sukhwinder’s voice has been given some effects here, but interestingly, the rock-solid voice is sounding good with them as well. Nice start.

Badmash Dil. Oops, Saathiya. Well, whatever be the title of the song, Ajay-Atul come up with a superbly lovely romantic number sung by Shreya Ghoshal, supported by Ajay Gogavale himself, giving it a breeze that is nowadays found only in Mohit Chauhan’s songs. Do listen to it.

The last, yes, the third and the last original song of the album, has a relatively unthinkable combination of Richa Sharma and Kunal Ganjawala who sing Maula Maula together. The song has a Qawwali-ish mood though it’s not a full-fledged Qawwali, but what is best in the song is that the melody and the overall music of the song are good and while likable at the first listening, the song will still take time to completely grow on you.

Another good thing about the album is that out of three, two remixes also sound more-than-average, and the third isn’t bad either.

In short, Singham is an album to listen to. Do buy, do listen.

A Strange Love Story: Music Review (Santok Singh, Ripul-Dharmesh)

The album starts with a slightly old sounding, but quite nice and likable Nede nede, sung by none other than Sukhwinder Singh. A good composition, Nede nede doesn’t have Sukhwinder singing at high pitches or something but a rather normal but nonetheless lovely rendering of the song. Try this one.

The next song, More Piya, sung by Ripul, one of the composer duo, with Momita, starts with fast, heard-them-a-hundred-times beats, which, after some time start turning into a disappointment, as there seems to be almost nothing in the song except those beats and some rendering of more piya, tore bina na laage jiya. And even when the Tabla comes into picture, the background sounds noisy. Could be much better.

Hare Jhande ke Shehzade, a Qawwali’ish number sung by Shahid Ali Khan in praise of peer Dastgeer, is a good one again, especially because it sounds not like a movie song but an authentic number. Liked it.

The album also has three instrumentals, out of which Love Theme is a nice little one even though the use of instruments is quite regular. The Beach Music, though, doesn’t sound very beachy, and the billy trance reminds me more of Crazy Frog than anything else.

Stanley ka Dabba: Music Review (Hitesh Sonik)

Life bahot simple hai. If you are not yet humming this, you’ll soon be, that much I can tell you for sure. Shaan almost does a bum bum bole without exactly getting into that mood and pitch. A soft, innocent, lovely song that is good for you, whatever age you are.

Sukhwinder’s Dabba has some trying-to-do-a-Gulzar lyrics and while the lyricist Amole Gupte gets some on and off success, the overall effect of music, lyrics, and Sukhwinder’s singing is quite likeable. The innocence in Sukhi’s voice once again tells you how that man of hiiiiighhhhh notes can be humble with his voice too. Nice.

The next comes Nanhi si jaan, a light rock number sung by Shankar Mahadevan with a melody that sounds somewhat like that of the ’90s to me. Still, Shankar makes the song worthwhile to an extent. And then, after listening to the entire album, I expect that the song will find its place as the movie comes up. Hopefully.

The next song, Tere andar bhi kahin, is sung by Vishal Dadlani. The song is a light rock number again, but this one is quite different in its treatment and words take precedence over everything in this one. Somehow Vishal’s voice seems to be doing justice to the poetry in this one. Not too ‘musical,’ but it’s lovely and I expect the movie will make this one a favorite.

The next song, the only one in the album with a female voice, Jhoola Jhool by Hamsika Iyer is a short lullaby that sounds lovely if you’re patient enough. A small piece of good work by Hitesh.

The next small piece, Aditya rox, a version of tere andar bhi kahin, is not really very musical, but I liked it nonetheless. Though I don’t think I’ll be listening much to this one.

The last piece of the album is an instrumental which makes me feel once again that Amole Gupte is not yet out of Taare Zameen Par as ‘Thirsty‘ or Stanley Theme definitely more or less reminds you of Kholo Kholo darwaze more than anything. And then of course, going back to the first song may prove that Amole is at least trying to give people an idea that it’s something, in some way, close to or related to TZP.

Still, the overall impact of the album is good. The music is fresh and Amole’s lyrics definitely speak for his movie only. The good part is that even though you can relate the music to the children’s movie, you can enjoy it anyway, something I’d consider a huge achievement for a debutant album composer in Bollywood.

Tera Kya Hoga Johnny: Music Review

Tera Kya Hoga Johny is not a regular movie, and the music isn’t regular either. Sudhir Mishra brings in Pankaj Awasthi and Ali Azmat to compose the music for the album and they definitely give some different music, that is their regular music. Here is an insight into the music of Tera Kya Hoga Johnny.

The album starts with the title song sung by Sukhwinder Singh, a not-so-typical-Pankaj-Awasthi composition that may remind one of Johnny Gaddar. Though the song is well sung by Sukhwinder, it’s more of a background thing and not really for free listening until you have seen the movie/video.
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Tees Maar Khan: Music Review

Tees Maar Khan comes as a relief. The relied that Vishal-Shekhar finally create something that is not the same as I Hate Love Storys and Break ke Baad. As for what it IS, the music comes as some Masala music for the masala film Tees Maar Khan is going to be.

The album starts with a very Characteristic title song that very much identifies itself with the movie, as the movie is supposed to be on a person who steals money from biggies, something similar happens with the song, which copies music from here and there and just puts it here. Quite a bogus thing from Shirish Kunder, where the only thing worth knowing is that Sonu Nigam is all the voices in the song.

Now, Vishal-Shekhar come into the picture, or Sound, to be more precise. The first song is Sheila ki Jawani, sung by Sunidhi Chauhan and supported by Vishal Dadlani. Now the song is not a typical item number with all desi moves as the title may suggest, but it’s an item number with a fake-spohisticated touch, but sounds fine as the fakeness is deliberate. The good thing is that Vishal-Shekhar know what they are doing. Vishal sounds good in his few lines. Okay as of now, should be very likeable in the video.

Wallah re Wallah, which also features Saregemapa’s Kamal Khan among its many singers, is a highlight of the album. A qawwali with some okay lyrics and well-made music is worth listening to. In fact for keeping the qawwali sound good even with all those added beats should have been something not really easy for the composers. Good work there. Makes for a good listen and I guess would make a perfect thing with a jazzy video showing Salman Khan. The wallah wallah part can prove addictive while the rest of the song goes good on melody. Expect the song to be a rage if the video comes out good. Should be.

Badey Dilwala, the next, is a Dabangg Omkara thing with an added comic mood, trying to make things sound a bit different from the two songs and kind of succeeding. But then Sukhwinder Singh singing the song again makes you think about Dabangg and Omkara, can’t help it. Sukhwinder though sounds more like in a Dil-haara form. Some very interesting lyrics add to the interest and popularity quotients of the song.

The fifth n last song of the album, fourth by V-S, is Happy Ending, a song with some beautiful chorus and some lovely plus slightly comic lyrics. The best part of the lyrics is the honesty of them and Vishal-Shekhar somehow are really good at sounding honest, right from the time they created Tu Ashiqui Hai, not comparing the two songs at all, at the same time. The song starts with something that gives you a feel you’re going to get a ‘chaand taare tod laaun (Yes Boss)’ and then moves on to get you something more comic than what you probably, still not disappointing. Also, with Prajakta Shukre, Harshit Saxena, Abhijeet Sawant and Debojit singing the song, I somehow got an Indian Idol feel in the song, but I cannot say if that was just a figment of my own imagination. O yeah, I know Harshit was in VoI, but then majority counts. 🙂

Overall Tees Maar Khan is not a musical thing to be precise, but then the music is fine and very much in sync with the movie that Tees Maar Khan is expected to be. What you might miss in this one after Om Shanti Om is just a Ajab si ajab si adaayein. Jag Soona Soona Laage was not meant to be a part of Tees Maar Khan anyway I guess.

As of now, what I loved the most, a bit surprisingly for myself, is ‘Happy Ending.’

Let Down: Tees Maar Khan title. I think the title theme should have been given to V-S. They can prove pretty good at such things. Doesn’t the Golmaal theme say so?

Band Baaja Baaraat. As Usual.

Band Baaja Baaraat is an album by Salim-Sulaiman after quite a long break, but the way the album starts, I just feel like they had never left, as the very first seconds sound so much like their typical. But then Salim starts singing, like some Labh Janjua, and gives quite a fast-track thing with Sunidhi Chauhan. One interesting thing about the song is that the background has some Amit Trivedi style band baaja effect though the song still sounds mostly Salim-Sulaiman composition as usual. Completely in sync with the movie’s name.

Tarkeebein, sung by Benny Dayaal, even though not bad, and quite good on lyrics, sounds quite a Pocket mein Rocket. Now all I’d say is that you have just two pockets. So even if this rocket can be adjusted, there is no room for more. 😉 Please get us something new, Merchants.

It’s Shreya Ghoshal. Saying this because when Adha Ishq starts you for once are quite convinced it’s Sunidhi. But it’s not, at least by the album cover. Frankly, I loved the song, and except that it’s almost Shukran Allah in the background, I think the song is just wonderful. Well done composers and awesome job Shreya. But Salim sir, try changing the voice a bit or change the styles, like you did in the title song. Will be liked more.

Dum Dum Dum mast, sung by Benny and Himani Kapoor is something I liked again. Though the composition is not huge, the simplicity and the simple highs and lows given to the melody are quite likeable. Except for that characteristic beat, the arrangement quite fine and the way the lyrics have been given an upper hand, it’s just beautiful, a good thing.

Mitra. Though I am a fan of many songs of his, Amitabh Bhattacharya for the first time sounds like a full fledged singer and I’d like to give the credit to Salim-Sulaiman, for giving him the beautiful song. Part sufi style, part rock, part typical merchants, Mitra is something that you’d like to listen to. Amitabh Bhattacharya almost goes into Shafqat Amanat Ali Khan way of singing here. Like like.

Labh Janjua’s name in Band Baaja Baaraat is something that people would just expect. Baari Barsi is something like what you would expect from the name, but not all that. The song is not all Punjabi style but also has some desi comic mode as well as Salim’s groove part. The highlight of the song is Harshdeep’s non-Harshdeep rendering in desi-mood, but somehow I felt she was given a bit too much time, in a very similar tone. Still, I have to see how much the song is liked in future, which will quite depend on the video.

Whatsay about the 2 minute theme of Band Baaja Baarat? Okay. Actually good. Quite.

Ainvayi, the first song, appears in a Dilli Club mix too, quite regular. Not bad though.

And the last thing, Dum Dum (Sufi Mix) is sung by Sukhwinder and Himani. Well, now I know I was right when I thought I could spot some Sukhwinder like voice in the original version. Well, a usual remix, and nothing Sufi about it, and almost nothing good, except Sukhwinder’s voice.

Overall, Band Baaja Baaraat sounds like a usual album in the series that YRF and Salim-Sulaiman have been creating for past some time. The songs are not bad, but then you won’t remember about most of them after a few days. Still, not a bad thing for short term. The only bad thing about the album is that Salim-Sulaiman, coming after such a long break too, sounded quite repetitive.

Best ones: Mitra, Aadha Ishq, Dum Dum.

Update: OK. It’s pocket mein Rocket but m loving it. especially for the lyrics. so add Tarkeebein too. Probably over dum dum.

Dus Tola: Music Review (Sandesh, Gulzar)

Aisa hota tha is a not so slow song made by two masters of slow pieces, Sandesh Shandilya and Mohit Chauhan. I’m not doubting their talent with faster music, but both are generally known for their taste in slower music and here they come up with a likeable, fast, but not much western song. The percussion in the song is worth listening to. Certainly not bad, and then there are some good lyrics too.

Somehow, when I read the title Jee na jalayiyo with Sukhwinder’s name, I was hoping that the song would be good. And as soon as Sukhwinder came in to the song, I got a feel that my prediction was going right. The song is quite Indianized in the feel and in its quite down to earth lyrics too, but somehow the drums in the song say something else. A bit confused if I will be liking this mix a lot, though the song doesn’t sound bad. Again, the lyrics of the song are quite good, better than aisa hota tha in first look.

When I heard the song Laal-Laal-Laal hua patta chinaar ka, I suddenly felt the song was too Gulzar-ish and decided to look for the lyricist. And there was my surprise, it was actually Gulzar, a fact I had totally missed. Anyway, the review continues, this song being a bit beat-based and a bit heard type, even though I can’t exactly place where I have heard such music. In fact with this song I could find similarity in the composing styles of Amit Mishra who composed for Atithi tum kab jaoge.

Either way, the song has some awesome lyrics by Gulzar, they remind me of Maachis. And though the music isn’t half as deep as Vishal’s, it has some effect of chappa chappa on the composing style. A good song overall. Especially in case you have an ear for good lyrics.

Sonu Nigam’s tumse kya kehna is a slow, really slow song and for the first few seconds I was thinking if the song was moving at all. But after some time, Sonu’s softness and the slow melody of the song sound quite likeable and the chorus is effective, but short. I can feel Gulzar’s lyrics again though visibly intentional talk of gold makes things a bit not-that-great. Not bad. Not too good either. Not at the start at least.

The only time a female voice is heard in the song is when Sunidhi Chauhan comes up to sing a female version of Jee na jalayiyo. As she sings the song in her style, it sounds quite different from Sukhwinder’s version though both sound equally good.

Overall, Dus Tola is nothing too great, but for those with a taste for good lyrics and slow music, it is worth a listen for sure. Especially I’d recommend Laal-laal, and if you like that, then maybe the entire album. 🙂

Music Review: Dabannggg!!!!

The album starts with a wonderful Tere mast mast do nain sung by Rahat Fateh Ali Khan and Shreya Ghoshal. As Rahat sings the yet another beuatiful tune composed by Sajid-Wajid, it’s clear the composer duo can do better than their usual, and that Veer was not a fluke.

Munni Badnaam hui Darling tere liye is the item number of the album. The most interesting part of the song besides its addictive music is the singing done by Mamta Sharma and Aishwarya. This one is certainly going to rock small town/suburban areas.

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Dabangg: Tracklist

Salman Khan’s Dabangg is again composed by Sajid-Wajid and this time they are back with a big league of singers comprising of Sukhwinder Singh, Rahat Fateh Ali Khan, Sonu Nigam and Shreya Ghoshal. Here is the song list of the movie. As per reports and common sense both, Tere Mast do nain is the one to watch out for.

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Raavan: Music Review

maaguvanjalo.. aagubenjaaaalo…
a aen aen aen e eo.. a aen aen aen e eo..

Got what is that? Start of a good album, and a wonderful song. The album is called Raavan, and the song is, yes, you get that. Beeera. Beera, beera beera beera, beera beera beera beera beera, beera ke dus maathe, beera ke sau naam, chhede jo beera ko, dhama dham dham dham. If there was anything that could ever be compared to beera, it was probably Omkara, but seems Omkara also stays behind beera when it comes to being musical.
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Raavan: Soundtrack

So finally Mani Ratnam’s Raavan is here. Or so it will be, on April 24th, when Rahman’s music is out. Abhishek Bachchan can be seen in the video of Beera sets up a high expectation from the album, as well as the movie. Here is the soundtrack listing of the movie as found yet.

Behene De – Karthik
Beera Beera – Vijay Prakash
Kata Kata – Ila Arun, Sapna Awasthi & Kunal Ganjawala
Khilli Re – Reena Bhardwaj
Ranjha Ranjha – Rekha Bhardwaj & Javed Ali
Thok De Killi – Sukhwinder Singh

So hopes from the songs of Raavan are high. Check the video of the first song Beera too.