Zanjeer Music Review

The opening song of the album, Chirantan Bhatt’s Hum Hain Mumbai ke Hero is an addictive tune. But the lyrics of the song are so bad that using Amitabh Bachchan and Pran’s voices in the same song sounds bad to the legends. Anyway, Mika’s singing in the song is better than Priyanka’s acting, who, as pointed in a GIF, gets almost …

See the GIF on next page. Or if you think Priyanka might be NSFW, well, skip to Page 3.

Ladies v/s Ricky Bahl: Music Review (Salim-Sulaiman)

Salim-Sulaiman once again do well for the Yash Raj banner. Here is a review of Ladies v/s Ricky Bahl.

Aadat se majboor has some experimental sounds with the regular Salim-Sulaiman pop pattern. The tune is catchy and the song sounds quite nice. Easy on ears. Salim-Sulaiman-Benny-YRF is a success again.

The next, Jazbaa sung by Shilpa Rao, has some nice lyrics and Salim-Sulaiman give some simple sounding music for this one, though the choice of instruments doesn’t sound that simple if you listen with attention. Salim’s backing vocals might remind you of Fashion or any other of their songs as well. Still, the song is overall a nice one and the hardwork the composers have put in is clearly audible.

Vishal Dadlani and Shweta Pandit’s poppy Thug le has a bit too simple tune in some parts, and even though the song is made to be catchy, I didn’t feel the song would last long. The lyrics aren’t Amitabh’s best either. Okay.

Salim finally enters with a full-fledged song called Jigar da Tukda, sung with Shradhha Pandit. The Punjabi song with a lot of pop in it, Jigar da tukda is interesting and should be a hit considering the amount of publicity YRF would give it.

Fatal Attraction, the theme, which has Salim in it with an unknown female voice which sounded like Sunidhi Chauhan’s at some points, and which hit me like Marjaava at 1.58 mins, is okay. The remix of Aadat se Majboor sounded nice too, though didn’t like Jazbaa remix much.

Frankly, in Ladies v/s Ricky Bahl, Salim-Sulaiman seem to have tried to do something more than their regular even though staying in their favorite region. So there is something new, a little new sound, but still the signature of Salim-Sulaiman is there. I’d say nice, because the album is definitely good, but yeah, I am still waiting for the duo to be less techno and rely more on melody some time, like they did earlier, in Dor and Aaja Nachle. Hope they’ll come up with something ‘that’ nice too.

Tell Me O Kkhuda: Music Review (Pritam)

The album starts with Oh-I-think-I-have-seen-this-on-tv Someone somebody. Well, I mean to say that most of you would have seen it on the TV but probably just don’t remember. Well, again, it seems what you saw on the TV was the remix version and the original version seems to be nice, decent. Sunidhi seems doing well here and the lyrics fit with the slow tune. Actually, I like, though at six minutes the song gets a little too long.

The next entry is that of Anupam Amod and Aditi Banerjee’s Love you Dad, and almost tells you the real life story of Esha Deol and Dharmendra, even though the story in the movie would be something else. Anupam Amod sounds like some singer of ’90s but sounds nice, a nice one after Saudebaazi. As for Aditi, it’s not her song really as she doesn’t get too much to sing here. Emo stuff, not bad if you like that.

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Mere Brother ki Dulhan: Music Review (Sohail Sen)

Sohail Sen for the first time gets something worthwhile outside Ashutosh Gowariker’s camp, and he looks keen on making it big. Here is a review of his entry into YRF, Mere Brother ki Dulhan.

The album starts with the title song Mere Brother ki Dulhan, a fast paced, quickly addictive, likable number with some interesting lyrics from Irshad Kaamil sung by KK.

I was still in the first song when a chorus broke into some rocky words and Neha Bhasin into Dhunki Dhunki Dhunki laage. While the music is lovely, it’s Neha who surprises me with her lovely singing here. She’s been good in some Salim-Sulaiman songs earlier, in Fashion, as well as Pyaar Impossible, but this could be the song that would restate her entry into Hindi film industry.

The next song Chhoo Mantar is, I would say, a typical Sohail Sen piece, with his signature beats, and if I didn’t know it from the cover, I’d say is sung by him as well. Yes, it’s bad how I still don’t get Benny Dayal’s voice after so many of his songs that I completely love. Aditi Singh Sharma is as soft and husky with her voice here as she always is.

Isq Risk, the next song, sung by Rahat Fateh Ali Khan, gives a little small surprise in the beginning as you hear a radio (read AIR) style prologue to the song, telling whose music and words the song has. Sohail Sen’s melody is a bit ’90s in its treatment, but with Rahat singing, the song sounds pretty nice. Irshad Kamil’s words are lovely here.

Ali Zafar’s only entry in the soundtrack, Madhubala is simply enjoyable. I don’t think I want to use any other word for the song. It’s his signature ‘Masti’ that literally shows up here, nicely supported by Shweta Pandit.

Shahid Mallya, another name that is a bit new for me, is growing up quite fast nowadays. After Naina wali Whiskey in Sahi Dhandhe Galat Bande and with Mausam lined up for him, it’s the third place I have seen his name in this week, for Do Dhaari Talwar here. The song, with a little Punjabi flavor in it, mostly because of Shahid’s singing style and percussion based arrangements, is quite fast paced and enjoyable, though doesn’t look like very long lasting.

Overall, MBKD is a typical Yashraj album with songs that will be liked instantly by the public. Be it the title song or Dhunki, Isq risk or Madhubala, the composer is quite clear on what he wants the song to do and I feel that it would be a big plus for the movie. Go buy it if you like typical hit soundtracks of Bollywood.

PS: One interesting thing about the album is that even though Yashraj use a new composer here, many of the singers are the ones who have sung a lot for YRF, with their regular composers Salim-Sulaiman, especially Benny Dayal, Neha Bhasin and Shweta Pandit.

Bhindi Bazaar Inc. Music Review (Sandeep Surya)

The album opens with Akkad Bakkad sung by Suraj Jagan. The song is a parody of many things and almost every word in the song seems to remind of something or the other. Though, interestingly, the song sounds new even with pieces from Kishore Kumar’s songs to what not.

The next, maaldaar ki jeb, is more interesting in its singing and lyrics more than anything else. Tochi Raina, the man who has sung some wonderful songs, sings this one in a different style. A second different in a row.

After two ‘different’ songs, a classical sounding aa ja re piya is definitely music to ears. Well sung by Sandeep Goswami and Shweta Pandit, the song almost reminds me of kaare kaare badra of Mirch in the way it’s arranged, though Shankar Mahadevan was an added advantage in the latter. Anyway, a worth listening to song.

The next comes Taan ke Seena which is sung by Shibani Kashyap in her well known style, but the lyrics of the song are a bit on the other side, more of real-life lyrics instead of her more common-popular romantic ones. Okay, but probably Sunidhi could be a better choice for this one.

The last song of the album, Kitni Baatein, sung by Roop Kumar Rathod is a deeply sad one and Roop seems drowned in the depths of the song right from the start. A good, but very slow and quite sad number, that is not for everyone. Should work well as a background song in the movie.

Overall, Bhindi Bazaar is not really a musical, but the songs are good enough to be liked at least in the movie. Most of the songs have an instant appeal, especially the first two ‘different’ ones. If you like to check out new things, I’d say it’s worth a try.

Hello Darling: Music Review (Pritam)

Pritam is something like the name of a national Cricket team. Just like countries have a national team and then a second grade national ‘A’ team for some tours, we have ‘Pritam’s music’ and then ‘Pritam A’s music’ for some movies. This one is Pritam A.

I was wondering if I should even listen to the album but then I thought of Sharman Joshi and Tabu’s Toh Baat Pakki and decided to give it a shot. Here is the result, nothing great.
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