Tell Me O Kkhuda: Music Review (Pritam)

The album starts with Oh-I-think-I-have-seen-this-on-tv Someone somebody. Well, I mean to say that most of you would have seen it on the TV but probably just don’t remember. Well, again, it seems what you saw on the TV was the remix version and the original version seems to be nice, decent. Sunidhi seems doing well here and the lyrics fit with the slow tune. Actually, I like, though at six minutes the song gets a little too long.

The next entry is that of Anupam Amod and Aditi Banerjee’s Love you Dad, and almost tells you the real life story of Esha Deol and Dharmendra, even though the story in the movie would be something else. Anupam Amod sounds like some singer of ’90s but sounds nice, a nice one after Saudebaazi. As for Aditi, it’s not her song really as she doesn’t get too much to sing here. Emo stuff, not bad if you like that.

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Mod: Music Review (Tapas Relia)

Shivam Pathak and Shreya Ghoshal’s ‘Tu hi tu‘ is nice in music, its orchestration, and singing as well. The slow, restricted number with relatively light music is easy on ears, while Shivam Pathak’s so-heard voice seems really nice in the song.

The next song, Ae meri jaaniya, happens to be a solo for Shivam, and he, kind of expectedly, sounds a lot like in the footsteps of Sonu Nigam, in his early days, though the husky touch give a different character to his voice. Nice singing by him on the slow number, but I guess there is scope for improvement for him, more in the level of confidence.
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Saheb Biwi aur Gangster: Music Review (Various)

I was wondering whether to write a review or leave it for tomorrow when the second song of the album, Shail Hada’s Main ek Bhanwra caught my attention. A composition of Amit Sial and penned by Sandeep Nath, the simple song reminds me of the songs of Kishore Kumar’s days, should I say the ’70s if I am not exaggerating too much. Anyway, I think I have said a lot about the song. So listen and decide for yourself.

The next comes Rekha Bharadwaj’s I love to love you, composed by Anuj Garg. The lyrics of the song remind me of Gulaal to some extent, while the music of the song has a retro touch. Rekha is perfect here.

Chu Chu Acoustic version, which is sung by Debojit Saha, sounds a bit strange in the beginning though the song sounds like quite a nice composition going further. A slow number, with a retro feel again. Nice.
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I am Kalam: Music Review (Abhishek, Madhuparna, Papon, Shivji, Susmit)

Abhishek Ray’s composition for the words chaand taare jeb mein hain is well sung by KK and makes a nice listen. The next, Shreya’s Chini bhini, again composed by Abhishek, has lyrics bubbling with enthusiasm and Shreya is kind of surprising in this one as she sings the song in a little intoxicated voice. The combination of lyrics and music here is not really what one would expect seeing the lyrics, but it sounds nice the way it is.
Madhuparna composed Rang Jamale reminds me of Chak de the way it starts, but then the song has only a touch from there, more in the terms of arrangements than composition. The composition seems to have more touches from here and there, but does sound fine and Javed fits well here. The female version of the song, sung by Anushka Manchanda, is a little different from her regular more-English-than-Hindi songs and she sounds different, and nice. One good part is that Anushka doesn’t let the instruments overpower her voice here.

Papon’s self composed (probably his first in Bollywood) Zindagi aisi waisi is quite lovely and makes Papon sound promising once again, this time as a composer as well. I had already loved him in Jiyein Kyun, but this time he sounded more serious. Protique Mojoomdar’s positive lyrics are definitely a plus.

Susmit Bose and Shivji Dholi’s Jeevan ek rangoli hai is more of a live thing and the folk’ish number sounds different, like it’s recorded out of the recording rooms, like old songs. But the lyrics of the song are good and the song gives a ‘real’ feel.

Udan pe baitho kaaga bole is another small, real sounding track from Shivji Dholi which is almost unplugged with just a harmonium to support him.

The last track, children’s version of chaand taare jeb mein hain is an okay one. The version reminds me of Chillar Party where Amit Trivedi had got some children to sing in a wonderful manner, but here there is nothing like that and children just make a good chorus, like it happened in old movies during one time. Not bad.

Overall, I am Kalam is a good album with assorted composers. Interestingly the album doesn’t have usual run of the mill songs and also the lyrics of almost all the songs are good, irrespective of who they have been written or sung by. I hope the movie is equally good.

Buy I am Kalam Audio CD Here.

Phhir: Music Review (Sharib-Toshi, Raghav Sachar)

The album starts with Sharib singing Yaadein, a song that goes in the typical Bhatt style, but with slight deviations from track, making it a little different, in a good way. Though the touches of Jashnn are there in the song, it does sound pretty good.

The second song, Satrangi Sathiya, sung by Toshi is a little more on the track and sounds more like a typical song, say maahi of Jashnn or Haal-e-dil or Murder 2. But then, the song sounds good and that is what matters. Can go for this one. Tried and tested.

Raghav Sachar’s first composition for the album, love is all I got is a nice one, with a likeable melody, and his typical style, with Hindi and English words mixed together. Like again.

The next by Raghav isn’t so good though. Karma Queen, sung by Sunidhi is quite unimaginative and boring. Could have been avoided I guess.

The next song, Gumsum by Shreya, is another feather in the cap of today’s melody queen, mainly because of the way she takes the song almost on her own. A nice composition by Raghav Sachar, a little unlike him, and well sung by Shreya. Try it, especially if you like the slow ones.

The last song Loot, from Raghav again, and sung by Neha Bhasin and Jankee Parikh with him starts kind of nicely but goes into have-heard-it-earlier mode quite soon and though Raghav seems to try hard with the arrangements, the song doesn’t impress too much. Passable for now, may consider with some promotion.

Overall, the album is okay with some typical Bhatt songs (the ones by young Sabri Brothers) which sound as good as they always do, and some good try by Raghav as well, especially in gumsum.

Buy Phhir Audio CD Here.

Bodyguard: Music Review (Himesh Reshammiya, Pritam)

In Bodyguard title song, Salman tries to get a Dhinka chika done by Himesh and of course, success doesn’t come, not properly at least. But then the song can do well as a ‘title’ song, making a good background for the movie, and trailers.

Mika’s Desi beat is a nice try at a dance number, and the song should do fine, but again, Himesh doesn’t do any magic here, leaving me a bit disappointed.

What beats everything though, is Pritam’s I love you, sung by Ash King with Clinton Cerejo. Ash is not the best when it comes to diction and things like ‘main’ becoming almost ‘mein’ are common, but still his version sounds better than Shaan’s Unplugged. Typical of Pritam but lovely.

The next, Rahat and Shreya’s Teri meri meri teri prem kahani is a song with a complex, but lovely melody. The Himesh Reshammiya composition might take some time to grow on one, but sounds lovely nonetheless. In that context it reminds me of Anjaana Anjaani title track (by Vishal n Shilpa) though there is hardly any similarilty between the two. The unplugged version of the song is a little more interesting, though it doesn’t really seem necessary with the actual song quite easy on ears already. Nice sung by Rahat.

Overall, Bodyguard is not as good as I had expected, especially from Himesh. Though Pritam tries to make things better. And does that.

Buy Bodyguard Audio CD Here.

U R My Jaan: Music Review (Sanjeev Darshan)

The album starts with Shaan’s feel-like-’90s Kya kare dil bechara. The song has an okay melody and doesn’t sound really good, but doesn’t sound bad either. An okay one, reminding me of Anu Malik days of the ’90s.

The next song, that is the title track, is very Nadeem-Shravan’ish in its arrangements and is sung by Sanjeev himself with Shilpa Rao to support. The song is a good listen if you put it a few years back, but today, it seems the song could have been worked on a little more. Also, bringing in a professional singer instead of Sanjeev could be helpful.

The third track, Mera Maula Kare, sung by Roop Kumar Rathod, is a good one. The only thing that disappoints a bit is the climax of the melody after the lovely build up, but once you have heard it, the song does sound good. Sanjeev Darshan do create something worthy of their uncle’s voice here.

The next song, Shreya’s Main Zameen pe hoon, sounded like the most complete song of the album to me. Not that the song is the best of the album, but the way the composer duo have made this one, it doesn’t feel like there is anything left to do, hence giving a feeling of completion for the type of the song it is. Peppy, well sung, nice.

The Next track, bin tere we mahi, sung by Master Salim and Richa Sharma is a nice Qawwali’ish composition and though there is nothing much new in the song, it’s worth a listen as the singers have done a good job here.

The last track of the album, Chand wahi hai, is a nice sounding, seen and heard so many times, romantic track sung by Javed Ali and Shreya Ghoshal. Okay end to the album.

Overall, the album is not great and is kinda insignificant, but is not as bad as I had expected it to be. Sanjeev Darshan are yet to be good enough to compete with today’s composers and to an extent, still have to come out of ’90s phase, but it was a nice try from them here.

Aarakshan Music Review (Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy, Prasoon Joshi)

After a long time, Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy look in their full color. No, I won’t say ZNMD was bad, but somehow it was patterned, without much ‘new’ really. But they are back again with Aarakshan, with their old mate Prasoon Joshi, this time not just writing but also composing a number, which surprisingly, almost beats SEL’s compositions.

The album starts with ‘Mauka‘ which is, in a way, the theme song of the movie. The song, that basically talks about giving a chaanas (chance) is a song with enthusiasm and a wish to do something. Sung by five singers led by Raman Mahadevan and Mahalaxmi, the song has an item’ish, addictive touch to the music and zeal in the lyrics. Will get promotion, has to work.

Next comes Achcha lagta hai, sung by Mohit Chauhan and Shreya Ghoshal. The song that reminds me of rut aa gayi re in the first few moments, is a peppy number with some nice and fresh arrangements and while Mohit Chauhan is as great as ever with his lovely voice, Shreya is completely into the conversation happening in the song. Liked it. Very much.

Still, Kaun si dor/ Saans Albeli, the composition of Prasoon Joshi, is the surprise of the album. While I had no idea what to expect from him in his first ever composition (at least to my knowledge, in and out of movies), he completely took me by wonder with the song that, sung by Pt Channulal Mishra (with Shreya in case of the duet version Kaun si dor), goes almost completely classical, and the best part is that once I started listening to the song, I did not feel like stopping it for even once in the quarter to six minutes’ run of the song. Completely loved Prasoon’s debut as a composer.

The last song of the album is Roshanee, sung by Shankar Mahadevan, which starts in a slightly ‘Uff teri adaa’ style, but shifts totally to a passionate, ‘joshila’ number very soon. Again some new arrangements from Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy with some good words by Prasoon.

In short, the album is a small treat of four songs from Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy and Prasoon Joshi. Prakash Jha, who got four different composers to create four songs in Raajneeti has once again got it right, in fact better this time.

Singham: Music Review (Ajay-Atul)

Ajay-Atul might be a new name for an average Hindi music listener, but for those who are into Marathi music in the slightest, Ajay Gogavale and Atul Gogavale are definitely not new. After their smaller stints in Hindi movies like Viruddh, finally they are here in a popular, big budget typical Bollywood movie, Rohit Shetty’s Singham. And they seem good here as well.

The album starts with the title song, sung by none other than Sukhwinder Singh. Sukhiji, who has Omkara and Dabangg to his credits, gets even more serious here and the song does not only have a catchy title rhythm, but a good antara as well, giving us a quality title song. Sukhwinder’s voice has been given some effects here, but interestingly, the rock-solid voice is sounding good with them as well. Nice start.

Badmash Dil. Oops, Saathiya. Well, whatever be the title of the song, Ajay-Atul come up with a superbly lovely romantic number sung by Shreya Ghoshal, supported by Ajay Gogavale himself, giving it a breeze that is nowadays found only in Mohit Chauhan’s songs. Do listen to it.

The last, yes, the third and the last original song of the album, has a relatively unthinkable combination of Richa Sharma and Kunal Ganjawala who sing Maula Maula together. The song has a Qawwali-ish mood though it’s not a full-fledged Qawwali, but what is best in the song is that the melody and the overall music of the song are good and while likable at the first listening, the song will still take time to completely grow on you.

Another good thing about the album is that out of three, two remixes also sound more-than-average, and the third isn’t bad either.

In short, Singham is an album to listen to. Do buy, do listen.

Kashmakash – Music Review (Sanjoy-Raja, Gulzar)

Shreya Ghoshal is a singer who proves her metal whenever there is a chance. This one is no exception and one is spellbound as she sings Manwa aage bhaage re to start Kashmakash, the Hindi version of Rituparno Ghosh’s Noukadubi. The slow number has very light background music and Shreya takes the song ahead on her own, and so delightfully. Loved to hear this one. Especially if you listen to Gulzar’s words carefully.

Hariharan starts singing the second song khoya kya of the album like he were Ustaad Hariharan. I mean to say, Hariharan has always been wonderful with his singing but this time the depth in his voice almost beats himself. My guess is that he’s getting better with age, if there is scope. Gulzar is definitely better in this one. A bit on the philosophical side, it’ll be definitely loved if you’re one for the slow, serious singing.

The next song Teri Seemayein again brings in Shreya. A well sung one again, though I found the lyrics a bit confusing at some points. Probably haven’t been able to decipher the words of the maestro.

The next song, Naav Meri, brings in Hariharan and Madhushree. While the song treads at a slightly higher pace than the rest, the lyrics are absolutely delightful and hence the song completely touched me. In fact the arrangement of the song is interesting too as it seems to moving like a boat itself. Do listen to this one. Doob ke shayad is nauka ko mil jaaye kinara..

The last track of the album is a rendition of Tagore’s anandloke, mangalaloke by Sudeshna Chatterjee and choir. The good part is that even with my very limited Bangla knowledge, I was able to understand most of it.

Overall, Kashmakash is one delightful album with slow and meaningful songs and if you’re one for the kind, this treat with the big names like Hariharan, Shreya and Gulzar should not be missed, even if contains just four Hindi songs.

You can buy the album from flipkart here.

Love u Mr Kalakaar Music Review (Sandesh Shandilya)

I don’t really look forward to Tusshar Kapoor’s movies. Or their music. But recently, it seems things are becoming different. Last week it was Shor in the City and this time it’s none other than Sandesh Shandilya’s Love u Mr Kalakaar that seem to have changed things for at least now. Here comes a review.

Sandesh’s album starts with a song called Sarphira sa hai dil, sung by Shreya and, wait-for-it, Neeraj Shridhar. Well, Sandesh seems to be doing things more market-way in this one (and hence comes Neeraj) but not in a negative way. A soft-romantic and good melody but with some not-so-typical-of-him arrangements from the composer. Sounds more like a good work of Pritam, definitely worth a try.

The next song, Tera Intezaar, brings in Vijay Prakash and Gayatri Ganjawalla and while this one may not be loved by some fans of Sandesh Shandilya’s fans (I hope he has some), it’s a good one again. The beats may sound a bit too much but Vijay Prakash gets to sing a lovely one and I think the song can pick up quite fast.

The next song, Bhoore Bhoore Badal has Kunal Ganjawalla and Shreya doing some back-to-Shandilya singing. Nice and kinda experimental one with some good lyrics, but somehow this poetry doesn’t take off as well as I expected at the start. Still do listen to the song if you like Shandilya’s music. You might like it as well.

Kunal-Gayatri Ganjawalla sung title song is the, well, boring title song, for probably the credits. Kunal in his typical style and not too bad, but nothing really musical.

Next comes a Mohit Chauhan-Shivangi Kashyap sung Kahin se Chali aa, which is attracting from the very first word. I need not say that Mohit Chauhan and Sandesh can be a deadly combination, and in this one Mohit seems to be just gliding his voice on the music in a very natural style without any special treatment. Kinda soothing, though I probably won’t say the same for Shivangi.

Again, Reeky Dev’s revisited Tera Intezaar isn’t bad. The Mumbai-based-Bangladeshi singer (says FB) does sound good here. Will probably look for the name going further.

The last, Reaching for the Rainbow sung by Jenice Sobti and Vinnie Hutton, is a soothing all-English melody, which somehow enticed such a hardly-ever English listener. Not bad, I guess.

Overall, Love u Mr Kalakaar seems to be a good step as it definitely goes beyond my expectations, which was actually a big naught (I didn’t know it was a Barjatya’s thing) and even though the album is not something huge, the songs are okay and almost all are at least worth a try. So do listen to the album and decide how many songs would stick to your playlist. I expect a few, at least kahin se chali aa, and probably a version of Tera intezaar.

Shor in the City: Music Review

Dheere Dheere, jiya ko dheere dheere, apna sa laage hai saibo. Sachin-Jigar are once again here to prove themselves, and this time they use the voices of Shreya Ghoshal and Tochi Raina to prove their point.

The first song of the album called ‘Shor in the City’ is definitely not shor of city. Shreya starts the song in her soft voice with a light Punjabi accent and then Tochi almost adds a new life to it. The variation in terms of instruments is something to watch out for in the song. Wonderful use of Indian instruments in between so many western ones while Sachin-Jigar keep the melody simple. Delighting.

The next song, though, more talks like Shor. Karma is a bitch sung by Suraj Jagan, Priya and Swati is more of an experimental one and gives a feeling of Robot in some places, the way it is arranged. The Hindi rap (karma khula saand) and dera-dam-dam-dam-da are some good parts. With some publicity and a good video, the song may pick up well.

Shor, sung by the strong-voiced but much unkown singer Mohan, is yet another track to be heard. Like all other songs of him, this one again has some inspiring lyrics and even the song is not a ‘naav,’ it’s worth a try. If I say the song reminds me of Indian Ocean, you may be a bit too high on expectations, so I’d leave the comment and just recommend you the song without much specifications.

The next comes Dheem Dheem Tana, which is sung by Shriram Iyer, is yet another ‘different’ song with some Hindi rapping, in some places with Sanskrit tatsam words, the song has some good vocals and arrangements too, but somehow it doesn’t leave much impact. Okay stuff.

The album also has a remix of Saibo and Roop Kumar Rathod’s teri justajoo, Agnee’s Ujale Baaz and Kailasa’s Babam bam babam as bonus tracks.

Overall, Sachin-Jigar and Harpreet’s Shor in the City has some good songs and Dheere Dheere and Shor leave an impact. Do try this one.

Game (2011) Music Review – Shankar Ehsaan Loy

I can sum up the album in one sentence. It’s not upto the name of Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy.

The album starts with Vishal Dadlani’s It’s a game. While the song is not an instant thing, Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy’s arrangements with a hangover of Karthik Calling Karthik make Vishal’s good singing work to some extent. You may like it if you pay some attention.

The reprise version sung by Sunitha Sarath seems dull, probably because the voice lacks the life that Vishal has in his voice.

Kaun hai Ajnabi
has some lovely vocals by KK and Aditi Singh Sharma, but the song sounds more of a Pritam number than SEL’s. Not bad, though nothing great. Interestingly, the remix of the song works equally good.

Maine ye kab socha tha is a different side of the album where Shaan comes up to sing a romantic number with Anusha Mani, supported by Loy and almost a chorus, something like in We are Family. Though the song is quite good in parts, it doesn’t really sound like one song in whole and that may be a reason for its failure.

The last original number, Mehki Mehki, sung by Shreya Ghoshal and Kshitij, is a different sound and almost enters the territory of A R Rahman. At some points I just felt like I have heard the song, but it was probably just the ambiance and hence I couldn’t point towards any song. With a slight touch of old Bollywood songs of maybe ’70s and all these new mentioned things, Mehki Mehki is definitely something worth a try. Listen to it and probably you will fall for it in due time.

As for the remix of Mehki Mehki, it’s not bad, but the song loses the beautiful arrangements that existed in the original version and made the soul of the song, so nothing much to listen to here.

Overall, Game is an okay album but if you’re thinking of buying the album just because you know Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy and you know their standard, you may be in for a little disappointment.

Tera Kya Hoga Johnny: Music Review

Tera Kya Hoga Johny is not a regular movie, and the music isn’t regular either. Sudhir Mishra brings in Pankaj Awasthi and Ali Azmat to compose the music for the album and they definitely give some different music, that is their regular music. Here is an insight into the music of Tera Kya Hoga Johnny.

The album starts with the title song sung by Sukhwinder Singh, a not-so-typical-Pankaj-Awasthi composition that may remind one of Johnny Gaddar. Though the song is well sung by Sukhwinder, it’s more of a background thing and not really for free listening until you have seen the movie/video.
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Band Baaja Baaraat. As Usual.

Band Baaja Baaraat is an album by Salim-Sulaiman after quite a long break, but the way the album starts, I just feel like they had never left, as the very first seconds sound so much like their typical. But then Salim starts singing, like some Labh Janjua, and gives quite a fast-track thing with Sunidhi Chauhan. One interesting thing about the song is that the background has some Amit Trivedi style band baaja effect though the song still sounds mostly Salim-Sulaiman composition as usual. Completely in sync with the movie’s name.

Tarkeebein, sung by Benny Dayaal, even though not bad, and quite good on lyrics, sounds quite a Pocket mein Rocket. Now all I’d say is that you have just two pockets. So even if this rocket can be adjusted, there is no room for more. 😉 Please get us something new, Merchants.

It’s Shreya Ghoshal. Saying this because when Adha Ishq starts you for once are quite convinced it’s Sunidhi. But it’s not, at least by the album cover. Frankly, I loved the song, and except that it’s almost Shukran Allah in the background, I think the song is just wonderful. Well done composers and awesome job Shreya. But Salim sir, try changing the voice a bit or change the styles, like you did in the title song. Will be liked more.

Dum Dum Dum mast, sung by Benny and Himani Kapoor is something I liked again. Though the composition is not huge, the simplicity and the simple highs and lows given to the melody are quite likeable. Except for that characteristic beat, the arrangement quite fine and the way the lyrics have been given an upper hand, it’s just beautiful, a good thing.

Mitra. Though I am a fan of many songs of his, Amitabh Bhattacharya for the first time sounds like a full fledged singer and I’d like to give the credit to Salim-Sulaiman, for giving him the beautiful song. Part sufi style, part rock, part typical merchants, Mitra is something that you’d like to listen to. Amitabh Bhattacharya almost goes into Shafqat Amanat Ali Khan way of singing here. Like like.

Labh Janjua’s name in Band Baaja Baaraat is something that people would just expect. Baari Barsi is something like what you would expect from the name, but not all that. The song is not all Punjabi style but also has some desi comic mode as well as Salim’s groove part. The highlight of the song is Harshdeep’s non-Harshdeep rendering in desi-mood, but somehow I felt she was given a bit too much time, in a very similar tone. Still, I have to see how much the song is liked in future, which will quite depend on the video.

Whatsay about the 2 minute theme of Band Baaja Baarat? Okay. Actually good. Quite.

Ainvayi, the first song, appears in a Dilli Club mix too, quite regular. Not bad though.

And the last thing, Dum Dum (Sufi Mix) is sung by Sukhwinder and Himani. Well, now I know I was right when I thought I could spot some Sukhwinder like voice in the original version. Well, a usual remix, and nothing Sufi about it, and almost nothing good, except Sukhwinder’s voice.

Overall, Band Baaja Baaraat sounds like a usual album in the series that YRF and Salim-Sulaiman have been creating for past some time. The songs are not bad, but then you won’t remember about most of them after a few days. Still, not a bad thing for short term. The only bad thing about the album is that Salim-Sulaiman, coming after such a long break too, sounded quite repetitive.

Best ones: Mitra, Aadha Ishq, Dum Dum.

Update: OK. It’s pocket mein Rocket but m loving it. especially for the lyrics. so add Tarkeebein too. Probably over dum dum.