Matru ki Bijlee ka Mandola: Music Review (Vishal Bhardwaj)

Vishal. Means Big. So he is, and this time, so is the soundtrack. Literally and figuratively.

The man who brought us rock way back in 2003 and Kalinka in 2011 (as Darling) is this time here with a soundtrack of no less than twelve songs, ranging from Prem Dehati’s renderings to Zulu.

Of course, you get the taste of Gulzar’s pen in the album.

The album begins with the heard-by-everyone title track, that does nothing but makes you dance. There is a madness in the tune, and Gulzar’s lyrics maintain that madness. My guess is that you would have danced to it already. If not, do that, cuz you need not be a dancer to dance to this tune.

The second song of the album, Khamakha Nahi has a foreign element (I dunno which country really) in the beginning chorus, and then it gives you a taste of something like Bekaraan. The romantic track has some simple lyrics by Gulzar, which one can almost identify as his. Loved it.

Oye Boy Charlie, sung by Rekha with Shankar Mahadevan and Mohit is one lovely piece from the album. The song has an English title, desi Gulzar’ed lyrics, desi music and earthy voices. To top it all, the visuals are quite interesting with a comic element. Listen to it. Watch it.

The next track, Hatt Lootnewale, has some lyrics against oppression, and the music isn’t too attractive. But the song has got the best of the singers, as Sukhwinder Singh and Master Saleem, something that may change the listeners’ perception in due time. The popularity of the song will depend a lot on the story/picturization and publicity.

Next comes Shara-ra-ra. A small, one n a half minute track, sung by Prem Dehati. The song is a earthy track with the music, lyrics, and even the brass-band based arrangements being village type. However, this doesn’t sound like Piyush Mishra earthy. So, good, but not exceptionally so.

Badal Uthya ri Sakhi. That’s what the best song of the album is called. The track, sung by Rekha (and later by Prem Dehati in Reprise) is ma’am singing in a full classic-folk mood, with minimal music, and a Sitar ruling the background. The song is actually an old folk song from Haryana and quite popular there. So you know what it is. Do listen. And listen. And let it grow on you.

The joke was, after his debut in Mausam, this guy gets two songs in Vishal Bhardwaj’s Matru ki Bijlee ka Mandola. His name is Pankaj Kapur.

Pankaj sings the next two tracks of the album, which are fun, but would be enjoyed actually when the movie comes out, or at least the video comes out. Pankaj’s singing shows you one side of theatre artist that has hardly been touched by cinema. Try the tracks, or wait for the videos.

The next track is a first in India. It’s called Nomvula, and it’s Zulu music, sung by Umoja [Umoja means Unity in Swahili]. Even the lyrics of the song have been imported, without any Hindi/English being added to them. The music is nice, but I guess an adaptation, maybe something like Kalinka, would be better.

The end of the album comes with a reprise version of Badal Uthiya by Prem Dehati, and a small one for Lootnewale, sung by Sukhwinder. Badal Uthya is ‘almost’ as good as by Rekha, and Sukhwinder’s Lootnewale sounds a little more less noisy than the original version.

Overall, the album has a lot in terms of variety, and some tracks are wonderful; Khamakha, Oye Boy, and Badal Uthya to name the best. But then a few elements were missing too. Both the songs by Rekha are good, but Sukhwinder this time doesn’t seem to have got his fair share despite the number of tracks. When the album was over, I even missed Suresh Wadkar who’s been there for most of Vishal’s albums, including 7KM.

So yes, the album is good. Vishal has done some good work. And it’s worth listening to. But the thirst that came with the big size, isn’t quenched.

Don 2: Music Review (Shankar Ehsaan Loy)

So Farhan Akhtar makes SRK do a Salman in Don 2.

Well, I am not talking about acting, but like almost every Salman film, this time SRK starts the soundtrack of Don 2 with a dialog, that merges into the second track, Zaraa Dil ko thaam lo, beautifully sung by Vishal Dadlani and Anusha Mani. I mean Shankar Ehsaan Loy this time get a voice that sounds like that of a Don instead of Shaan, who sounded all nice, not too fit for a Don I’d say. The melody is nice even though SEL keep the arrangements much as in the previous Don. Nice start.

The thing that most interested me, however, was Usha Uthup’s mysterious voice singing na koi raat hai, na koi din yahaan, to start hai ye maaya. Shankar Ehsaan Loy come up with a nice melody again, though the arrangements have been kept very espionage-y, reminding me of Karthik calling Karthik where this job was entitled to Midival Punditz. Totally like. Precisely, it’s ‘more than background.’

Continue reading “Don 2: Music Review (Shankar Ehsaan Loy)”

Mod: Music Review (Tapas Relia)

Shivam Pathak and Shreya Ghoshal’s ‘Tu hi tu‘ is nice in music, its orchestration, and singing as well. The slow, restricted number with relatively light music is easy on ears, while Shivam Pathak’s so-heard voice seems really nice in the song.

The next song, Ae meri jaaniya, happens to be a solo for Shivam, and he, kind of expectedly, sounds a lot like in the footsteps of Sonu Nigam, in his early days, though the husky touch give a different character to his voice. Nice singing by him on the slow number, but I guess there is scope for improvement for him, more in the level of confidence.
Continue reading “Mod: Music Review (Tapas Relia)”

Aarakshan Music Review (Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy, Prasoon Joshi)

After a long time, Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy look in their full color. No, I won’t say ZNMD was bad, but somehow it was patterned, without much ‘new’ really. But they are back again with Aarakshan, with their old mate Prasoon Joshi, this time not just writing but also composing a number, which surprisingly, almost beats SEL’s compositions.

The album starts with ‘Mauka‘ which is, in a way, the theme song of the movie. The song, that basically talks about giving a chaanas (chance) is a song with enthusiasm and a wish to do something. Sung by five singers led by Raman Mahadevan and Mahalaxmi, the song has an item’ish, addictive touch to the music and zeal in the lyrics. Will get promotion, has to work.

Next comes Achcha lagta hai, sung by Mohit Chauhan and Shreya Ghoshal. The song that reminds me of rut aa gayi re in the first few moments, is a peppy number with some nice and fresh arrangements and while Mohit Chauhan is as great as ever with his lovely voice, Shreya is completely into the conversation happening in the song. Liked it. Very much.

Still, Kaun si dor/ Saans Albeli, the composition of Prasoon Joshi, is the surprise of the album. While I had no idea what to expect from him in his first ever composition (at least to my knowledge, in and out of movies), he completely took me by wonder with the song that, sung by Pt Channulal Mishra (with Shreya in case of the duet version Kaun si dor), goes almost completely classical, and the best part is that once I started listening to the song, I did not feel like stopping it for even once in the quarter to six minutes’ run of the song. Completely loved Prasoon’s debut as a composer.

The last song of the album is Roshanee, sung by Shankar Mahadevan, which starts in a slightly ‘Uff teri adaa’ style, but shifts totally to a passionate, ‘joshila’ number very soon. Again some new arrangements from Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy with some good words by Prasoon.

In short, the album is a small treat of four songs from Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy and Prasoon Joshi. Prakash Jha, who got four different composers to create four songs in Raajneeti has once again got it right, in fact better this time.

Zindagi na Milegi Dobara: Music Review

Kab tak ginen hum dhadkanein, dil jaise dhadke dhadakne do has that soul that is found in Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy-Farhan combos, that gives you the confidence to ‘do’ something, a Lakshya thing. Joi Barua sings for SEL in this one. Ik Junoon (Paint it Red) is a poppish one that goes to its limited highs in a way that it will be slowly, but highly addictive.

Khwabon ke Parindey has Alyssa singing a beautiful song in her sweet, eclectic voice, while Mohit supports her. Alyssa does a Caralisa in this one, almost going the Phir dekhiye style, though the song is slightly higher on notes compared to that one.

Senorita sung by Hrithik, Farhan, Abhay and Maria Del Mar Fernandez is gonna be the attraction of the album as the three actors seem to be doing good not only in singing but dancing as well. Lovely.

Shankar Mahadevan gives his first solo appearance in Der Lagi Lekin, Maine jeena seekh liya. I think the line says a lot about the song. Javed Akhtar’s positive lyrics have been sung by Shankar with all ease and in a way that the song appeals to you the very first time, to grow on you more, every time you listen to it. DO listen.

Loy, Dominique, Clinton Cerejo. You know what type the song is gonna be as soon as you read the names. A techno-techno Sooraj ki Baahon mein is nothing too new as far as arrangements are concerned, but the composition has got some simple-addictive-good beats and you learn four lines the first time you listen. You know what it means, don’t you? Hey Yeah!

In To Zinda ho tum. Farhan Akhtar renders his dad’s words as a poem with some music in the background, something that tends to inspire you, but though the words are good and well rendered, probably they are a bit too less. Could have been more, and thus better.

As for remixes, Ik Junoon remix is even more addictive than the actual song I guess, though Senorita Remix is not as interesting as the original.

Overall, ZNMD is something to celebrate, like you see in the movie. Do go for it. Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy are there again.

Coke Studio India. June 17th. 7 PM. MTV.

Coke Studio is finally in India. And while there may be questions about the credibility of the show and comparisons to its much older Pakistani counterpart, I am quite hopeful and almost sure that this will be a wonderful experience for us.

For now, here is some detail about the show, mostly about who all are gonna be there on the show.

The show will have twenty artistes. While the top Bollywood line of the show comprises of Shankar Mahadevan, Shaan, KK and Sunidhi Chauhan, we’ll also see Kailash Kher, Richa Sharma, Shruti Pathak, and Benny Dayal from Bollywood singers.

Besides, there will be Raghu Dixit, or should I say The Raghu Dixit Project, the well known name from Bangalore; once so popular Colonial Cousins – Hariharan and Leslie Lewis; comparatively lesser known Bollywood singers Harshdeep Kaur and Akriti Kakkar (Harshdeep is winner of two television reality shows and has even sung for A R Rahman in Rang De Basanti, Akriti has almost twenty movies to her credit where she has sung); and the singer of mora saiyyan, aankhon kay sagar, mitwa, and many more, Shafqat Amanat Ali Khan.

Then there are Sabri Brothers*, Aftab and Hashim Sabri, qawwali singers who have sung for Hindi films as well, my best memory being of Allah Allah from Yeh Dil Ashiqana (no idea how crappy the movie was but the songs were good, the qawwali being one of the best) and Tumse mil ke dil ka hai jo haal from Main hoon na.

Also the show will have Sufi singers Puranchand and Pyarelal Wadali i.e. Wadali Brothers there too. The pair has also sung a couple of songs for Bollywood, the latest being Rangrez in Tanu weds Manu.

In lesser known singers, which could and should make the real life of the show, there will be Assamese Bihu specialist Khagen Gogoi, Tamilnadu’s once-a-singer-at-thirteen Chinna Ponnu, another Assamese Mausam Gogoi, maker of boatmen band Majhi Mallah Saurav Mandal and New Delhi’s eclectic music group Advaita.

What is still a confusion though, is that while the list above is given on the ‘Artists’ page of the Coke Studio website, there is another sentence that says ‘The collaborations are so eclectic as to bring together Shafqat Ali and Shruti Pathak, Sunidhi Chauhan and Wadali Brothers, Kailash Kher and Papon, Shankar Mahadevan and Khogen Da, and Bombay Jayshree, Richa Sharma and Rashid Khan among others‘ while going by the list, I won’t find Papon, Bombay Jayshree and Rashid Khan on the show.

* My guess is that there is some mix up regarding them on the Coke Studio’s official website, they claim that Sabri Brothers are a Pakistani Qawwali party.

Stanley ka Dabba: Music Review (Hitesh Sonik)

Life bahot simple hai. If you are not yet humming this, you’ll soon be, that much I can tell you for sure. Shaan almost does a bum bum bole without exactly getting into that mood and pitch. A soft, innocent, lovely song that is good for you, whatever age you are.

Sukhwinder’s Dabba has some trying-to-do-a-Gulzar lyrics and while the lyricist Amole Gupte gets some on and off success, the overall effect of music, lyrics, and Sukhwinder’s singing is quite likeable. The innocence in Sukhi’s voice once again tells you how that man of hiiiiighhhhh notes can be humble with his voice too. Nice.

The next comes Nanhi si jaan, a light rock number sung by Shankar Mahadevan with a melody that sounds somewhat like that of the ’90s to me. Still, Shankar makes the song worthwhile to an extent. And then, after listening to the entire album, I expect that the song will find its place as the movie comes up. Hopefully.

The next song, Tere andar bhi kahin, is sung by Vishal Dadlani. The song is a light rock number again, but this one is quite different in its treatment and words take precedence over everything in this one. Somehow Vishal’s voice seems to be doing justice to the poetry in this one. Not too ‘musical,’ but it’s lovely and I expect the movie will make this one a favorite.

The next song, the only one in the album with a female voice, Jhoola Jhool by Hamsika Iyer is a short lullaby that sounds lovely if you’re patient enough. A small piece of good work by Hitesh.

The next small piece, Aditya rox, a version of tere andar bhi kahin, is not really very musical, but I liked it nonetheless. Though I don’t think I’ll be listening much to this one.

The last piece of the album is an instrumental which makes me feel once again that Amole Gupte is not yet out of Taare Zameen Par as ‘Thirsty‘ or Stanley Theme definitely more or less reminds you of Kholo Kholo darwaze more than anything. And then of course, going back to the first song may prove that Amole is at least trying to give people an idea that it’s something, in some way, close to or related to TZP.

Still, the overall impact of the album is good. The music is fresh and Amole’s lyrics definitely speak for his movie only. The good part is that even though you can relate the music to the children’s movie, you can enjoy it anyway, something I’d consider a huge achievement for a debutant album composer in Bollywood.

Zokkomon: Music Review (Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy)

Creating music for a children’s movie is definitely not a child’s play. Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy compose here for Darsheel Safary starrer Zokkomon. Here is a review.

The album opens with an Eena Meena Myna Mo sung by Yashmita Sharma. Quite an experimental tune, Eena Meena Myna Mo has touches of earlier works of the trio, but the song is quite fresh and Yashmita Sharma has certainly sung it beautifully. And the lyrics made me go back to the credits once again. Yes, it’s Javed Akhtar. Good one to start with.

The next, Suraj Jagan’s rocky, uplifting Suno Brother somehow seems potent to fit in a children’s movie. I guess SEL did something similar in Taare Zameen Par with Bheja Kam as well, but then the 3 minute track here is not so much rock as was Bheja Kam, and is kinda less experimental. An okay song, well sung by Suraj.

The title song Zokkomon has two versions. While the four plus minutes’ version is wonderfully sung by Shankar and does sound good with its slightly uplifting lyrics and part zealous-part beatful music, the smaller version sounds more like a background piece. Not too good, but the longer version is worth a try.

The next song, jhumjhunmakadstrma (no, I didn’t copy-paste), is sung by Kailash Kher, and while the song reminds me of Jajantaram-Mamantaram with its name, the song is a lovely tune with some easy on ear beats. Kailash Kher may not seem like such a good idea for a children’s song, but he does a wonderful work there. After all, Raghubir Yadav has done so much story-telling and singing for children with a similar kind of voice. Do try this one if you are interested in children’s songs.

Darsheel Safary, Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy and Shaan. Anyone would think of Bum Bum Bole, but then if that was your thought, you may be in for a slight disappointment as you listen to tum bin ye dil ghabraye. This one from Shaan is a slow, soft, slightly sad song, which I guess is way too slow for a children’s movie, even though the song has quality. Do try this one without thinking of the movie. Nice, but probably a misfit, at least until I watch the movie.

Overall, Zokkomon is a nice try by Shankar Ehsaan Loy, a try at that tough thing that is to create music for a children’s movie. But then it’s much better than the music that is offered by most of the children’s movies coming up today. I’m not too hopeful from the movie, but this standard of music certainly gives the movie some edge over other children’s movies and there is at least some hope building up.

Patiala House: Music Review (Shankar Ehsaan Loy)

Laung da Lishkara is something that is definitely going to be a hit. A beautifully created Punjabi song by Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy. The not-too-fast pace of the song is lovely, and how you still don’t want it to be fast and furious is the quality of the music here. The main singer, Jassi seems like a new voice here.

The next, Kyun Main Jaagoon by Shafqat Amanat Ali Khan maybe a bit too slow for loving it the first time, but as you listen to it, you love it more and more. A beautiful track with the background music that slowly grows inside the track. The unplugged version of the song is equally good. Oh, pain in Shafaqat’s voice sounds so very natural in here.

Mehndi vi mehndi, mehndi vi mehndi. Gaadha rang je chadhiya te balle ve balle. I am reminded of Kal ho naa ho. And then of Ajab Prem ki Gazab Kahani as Hard Kaur comes in, and then Shankar Mahadevan sounds all in mad-dance mode. Well, the song sounds a bit broken at the start, but once you’re used to it, the song is definitely gonna rock you. Raula pai gaya. Raula pai gaya. Dil se gaya. Raula pai gaya.

Khwabon ke lifafon mein, kisson mein kitabon mein, Vishal Dadlani sings aadat hai woh in his soft-husky voice. Well, I was surprised quite pleasantly, but a bit confused too as to why Vishal was singing this, and then when I heard usko banane wala kuch kuch to behka hoga, I knew Vishal was the perfect singer for the song. Lovely music, superb lyrics, deep singing. Woh aadat hai is a song with some poetry. I loved it, probably the most in the album, almost as much as Kyun Main Jaagoon. Do listen.

Baby when you talk to me is one more song in the Bollywood rock. This one is sung by Suraj and the way he sings it, it reminds me of Sadka kiya, though the song is not much like that one. Simple tune, and very instantly likable.

The next song, Tumba Tumba tudak gaya, is a kinda slow Punjabi-mixed dance number which stands out for its simplicity. Hans Raj Hans does a beautiful job at this one. The song may not be the best thing when you listen to it the first time, but slowly it takes up its space in your head. Also, have hopes from the video of the video.

Kailash Kher. Richa Sharma. OK. Kailash isn’t here this time, but Richa Sharma sings the mukhda of the bhajan Kailash sang for Road to Sangam. Aval Allah. A small track for the background. Not the full bhajan though, sadly.

The next thing is the remix of kyun main jaagoon. I’m not much into remixes, but quite loved this one. Try once even if you don’t listen to remixes.

The last, baby when you talk to me remix isn’t bad either, probably because there are no huge changes made in the song and speed seems to be the same.

Oh, forgot Raula pai gaya remix. Totally enjoying it.

Overall, Patiala House may not be among the best of Shankar Ehsaan Loy, but like most of their albums, the album has some freshness, and some good ol’ things. To say the least, Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy, once again, don’t disappoint. 🙂

Mirch: Music Review (Monty Sharma)

Monty Sharma’s Mirch is an album with some wonderful songs, even though there are a few signs of desperateness too. The best thing of the album is Shankar Mahadevan’s rock-meets-classical song Kaare Kaare Badra. The song is a beautiful fusion done with some good effort and Shankar does the song in a way that I feel this was made for him. Do listen to this one.

The next good thing here is Bela Shende’s Mann bhi hai. The song is a beautiful poetry and Bela has sung it beautifully over the simple music. Nothing too high or trying-too-hard. Just simple and lovely so.
Continue reading “Mirch: Music Review (Monty Sharma)”

Guzaarish: Music Review

When I heard the songs of Guzaarish for the first time (I’m not talking of the promo here), my first reaction was of disappointment. I could see that there were songs very similar in nature, to each other, and to that of Saanwariya. But I could see that given time, some of the songs could grow on me, or anyone who would listen to them. So I have taken my own time writing a review, hoping I can do justice to Sanjay Leela Bhansali’s first attempt at music composition.

The album starts with the title song, bas itni si tumse guzaarish hai. The song, sung by KK and Shail Hada, is a slow, beautiful plea with not too much of music, but some really lovable words. The music is the type you would like to listen to while sitting in your balcony with no work troubling your mind. I don’t think you can appreciate the song if you have something else on your mind and just trying to soothe yourself with the track. It’s just not that involving. So the verdict is simply ‘good.’

The second track of the Guzaarish gets a bit Gulzar-ish with the words. Sau gram zindagi treats human life very tangibly and talks about it very poetically. At the same time, the music is almost like supporting the poetry and not going much ‘musical.’ Bhansali gets the required softness in music quite aptly at times but you can feel it’s lack of experience that right after quite a melodic line you get a very banal melody. Anyway, the whole song does sound okay.

Tera Zikr Hai is one of the very highly poetic songs of the album and Bhansali gives quite some interesting music to the few words in every line of poetry. The song makes me feel Bhansali can be a composer even though the song is just likable.

The next song, Saiba, sung by Vibhavari Joshi and Francois Castellino (the guy sings Nakhre of Action Replayy too) is a very soft, little thing, that doesn’t have a lot to show off in terms of music or lyrics but just its sweetness and the beginning parts sung by Francois. Since Bhansali sells the sweetness in three minutes and doesn’t stretch things beyond limits, it’s not bad. Likable stuff.

The next song, or rather track, is Jaane kiske Khwaab, a three minute piece sung by KK. This one is almost a poem recited as there is hardly any music and quite minimal instruments. The negative point about the song is that the lyrics, which make the majority of the song, aren’t too great and hence the song fails to affect.

The next, Sunidhi’s Udi is definitely something to listen to and sounds quite different from the entire album. Bhansali n his team understand that well too and that’s the reason you can see the song being promoted quite highly on television. The song has some fast and different music even though the arrangements have similar touch as the rest of the album. Sunidhi is definitely good with the song and it sounds attractive from the very first time. Most important of all, the song gives you a break from all the similar songs.

Next song is Shail Hada’s solo piece, Keh na Sakoon. This one is quite a touching one and somehow my favorite from the album right now. The song has some good lyrics like most of the songs in the album and while the music is kinda minimal again, Shail’s voice feels touching in this one, especially at the beginning lines of the song, keh na sakun-seh na sakun. I recommend.

The next song of the album is Chaand ki Katori Hai, sung by Harshdeep Kaur. Harshdeep is one of those singers whose name still makes me curious and in Guzaarish once again I loved her voice. The music of the song is not that great but this one is sung beautifully and one can listen to the song for that alone. Overall, the song is okay.

Shall I say that Daayein Baayein is Bhansali’s tryst with modernism here? The next track, daayein baayein, sung by KK, is a bit different from the album and some minor resemblances to what we hear all the time, i.e. Pritam etc. I’m not asking you to expect a complete Pritam song, but this is probably the closest Bhansali as a composer can get to Pritam’s style, or so I feel after listening to Guzaarish. Not bad. Nothing great either though.

Dhundhli Dhundhli Shaam hui, ab to wapas aa jao, ke is samay to parinde bhi laut aate hain, rendered by Shankar Mahadevan. Frankly, such beautiful words and that great singer can make something worth listening to even without any music. To add to this, Sanjay Leela Bhansali gives some very lightly arranged, but deep music to the words and the effect that comes with Shankar’s voice is almost mesmerizing. Somehow I’m expecting more from the little song in the movie as I hope it’ll sound even more beautiful with fitting scenes. Btw, the song in some of its corners reminds me of refugee, probably some notes in the song.

Overall, I have quite a mixed opinion about Guzaarish. The major negative of the album is that many songs of the album sound quite similar in style and arrangement and there’s a lack of variety. The positives include the lyrics, some light, touching music in places and some good work done by singers, the last one matters here more because with the type of songs here, this is one very important requirement. Another positive is that even though many songs of the album are not instantly likable, many songs slowly grow on you and I guess that the songs should anyway have a longer shelf life.

As far as Sanjay Leela Bhansali’s work as a composer is concerned, I’ll have to agree that he is talented here too and he CAN compose, but I think he’s not good enough to compose complete albums with ten songs. Especially when he has a history of movies like Hum Dil De Chuke Sanam and Devdas.

Reham-O-Karam!

One of the best songs I have heard in past some time. Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy and Vishal, rock together in Karan’s We are Family. So here are the lyrics of the song.

aaj phir din hua
phir armaan jagne lage
chahaten uthi, nayi,
lo seene mein benaam si,
khwahishen dabi hui
kai dilon mein kayi
kya hua kyon bhala
dil mazaron se ho gaye
Continue reading “Reham-O-Karam!”

We Are Family: Another SEL Treat

Another much awaited album from the stable of Karan Johar. Another wonderful listen from Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy. Oh, did I forget Jailhouse rock? 😉

We are Family starts with SEL at their romantic best, as they come up with a typical romantic Aankhon mein neendein sung by Rahat Fateh Ali Khan and Shreya Ghoshal along with Shankar Mahadevan. Irshad Kamil does no breakthrough to lyrics but adds a few beautiful touches to his words here and there. Lovable. A song for the long run.

If you haven’t heard the album yet, reduce the volume a bit before the second song starts. As Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy-KJo-Sid make Kajol kill Elvis with Dil Khol ke let’s rock, it’s clear that the song is definitely not the best thing for a music lover, but the song is certainly a tongue-sticker. Taking the video into account, I’d say Anushka does a wonderful job at being carefree while Akriti is good as a support and singer. The rocker Suraj Jagan sings this one also really well, though the negative point of the same is that he doesn’t sound casual unlike Anushka. Last word, you are anyway not likely to love it the first time, and if you’re an Elvis fan, there is no way at all. But even after all this, the song is going to be a hit, a superhit. After all, it’s Elvis’ music, and recreated by none less than SEL.

Next is the Best. Vishal Dadlani and Shankar Mahadevan come together for a wonderful Reham-O-Karam and the song just rocks. Reham-O-Karam starts with a casual solo rendering by Shankar and then suddenly it all gets rocking. From the on Vishal and Shankar sing Irshad Kamil’s lyrics to the wonderful tune of SEL and it’s Magik. Oops, magic.

Next song happens to be Sonu Nigam and Shreya Ghoshal’s Hamesha and Forever, which is kind of typical with nothing new but just some sweetness that both Sonu and Shreya have in plenty. A soft, slow number that will stick itself with the story of the movie and will keep walking at its own pace. Another one for long runs, but ma take some time to take off. As the name says, Hamesha and Forever.

The last song of the album is Sun le dua yeh aasmaan. The song is pretty slow, even from Karan and Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy’s standards and Bela Shende does a good and pretty tough job as she moves the song alone. As a matter of fact, it’s almost a theme.

The end of the album is, of course, with a theme and this time Karan keeps the privilege for the trio again after MNIK where he had given the theme alone to Strings. It’s a typical, what do I say.

Overall, We Are Family is a predictably good and sweet album from Karan Johar and Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy. Believe me I’m keeping Karan first because that matters more here. And yes, all the three words (predictable-sweet-good) don’t fit with JailHouse Rock. Still, I’m humming it.

Best of the album: I guess Reham-O-Karam, followed by Aankhon mein neendein.

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We are Family: Another similar soundtrack?

I love Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy. But when it comes to Karan Johar, I suddenly become skeptical. I know Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy have given some fabulous music for Karan’s movies from their first song together (Kal ho na ho, title), but somehow I think Karan doesn’t use the full potential of Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy and I think there are several proofs of it. Take any ‘different’ song of Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy and you know it’s not from a Dharma movie (Exceptions are invited).

Now that Karan Johar’s next product We are Family is coming, some of the details are coming out and I’m again getting a feeling that the music of the film will be same again. The typical that happens to be in his movies: one or two songs with a Sufi touch, one party song, like in a bar or something, maybe one philosophical, and quite surely a sad version, and definitely one theme. I think though that after MNIK, WAF also may have one rock-ish number as Suraj Jagan is there again.

For example, I know there is a song called Rehem-o-Karam in the movie and by the very words, I smell a Sufi song. Not that I don’t like Sufi songs but hasn’t he had enough of them in MNIK already? By the way, the song Rehem-o-Karam is sung by Vishal Dadlani along with Shankar Mahadevan. I wish Rehem-o-Karam turns out to be a rock number but chances look kind of bleak.

I know Karan knows what he is doing and I also know that the songs that come out will be wonderful, and at the same time hit, superhit. But I think this way, music loses, and at the end, we lose.

Anyway, all I can do for now is anticipate and guess, until the music release, which is reportedly scheduled for first week of August, though I was expecting end of July, guessing 28th. And all I wish is that I’m proved wrong, and KJo and SEL bring us the best music we have ever heard. Amen.

Update: Here is the detailed soundtrack of the movie.

  1. Ankhon Mein Neendein – Rahat Fateh Ali Khan, Shreya Ghoshal, Shankar Mahadevan (5:02)
  2. Dil Khol Ke Let’s Rock – Anushka Manchanda, Akriti Kakkar, Suraj Jagan (03:57)
  3. Reham O Karam – Vishal Dadlani, Shankar Mahadevan (05:47)
  4. Hamesha & Forever – Sonu Nigam, Shreya Ghoshal, Tara Waaliya (04:51)
  5. Sun Le Dua Yeh Aasmaan (Theme Slow Version) – Shankar Mahadevan (03:53)
  6. We Are Family (Theme) – Dominique Cerejo, Clinton Cerejo, Neuman Pinto, Vivienne Pocha (02:48)

Raajneeti: Music Review

Quite opposite to once expectations and Prakash Jha’s image, Raajneeti seems to be a full fledged musical once you read the names of composers and singers on the cover of this album. And most of them succeed in doing it to quite an extent. Yes, Raajneeti has it’s fare share of good music. Here is more.

The album starts with Bheegi si, bhaagi si, which is a peppy, foot-tapping, Pritam type song sung by Mohit Chauhan with a relatively very new Antara Mitra who sounds something like Shreya Ghoshal. A good one to say the least. Catchy. Not long term, but not bad certainly.
Continue reading “Raajneeti: Music Review”