Miley na Miley Hum: Music Review (Sajid-Wajid)

I don’t know how you’re liking the video of Haan yahi pyaar hai showing Kangana Ranaut and Chirag Paswan, the song is easy on ears and Shaan seems to be doing good in some song after some time. Shreya is good as ever, or probably a little better, and that does add to the song. In short, I like.

The second song of the album, Wake Up now, is already on the TV too, and though the song faintly reminds me of some other song, and sounds like a wannabe Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy number, guess it is not too bad for a little party mood. Suzanne’s voice and the second-long entry of ghunghroo’s sound are some good points of the song.

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U R My Jaan: Music Review (Sanjeev Darshan)

The album starts with Shaan’s feel-like-’90s Kya kare dil bechara. The song has an okay melody and doesn’t sound really good, but doesn’t sound bad either. An okay one, reminding me of Anu Malik days of the ’90s.

The next song, that is the title track, is very Nadeem-Shravan’ish in its arrangements and is sung by Sanjeev himself with Shilpa Rao to support. The song is a good listen if you put it a few years back, but today, it seems the song could have been worked on a little more. Also, bringing in a professional singer instead of Sanjeev could be helpful.

The third track, Mera Maula Kare, sung by Roop Kumar Rathod, is a good one. The only thing that disappoints a bit is the climax of the melody after the lovely build up, but once you have heard it, the song does sound good. Sanjeev Darshan do create something worthy of their uncle’s voice here.

The next song, Shreya’s Main Zameen pe hoon, sounded like the most complete song of the album to me. Not that the song is the best of the album, but the way the composer duo have made this one, it doesn’t feel like there is anything left to do, hence giving a feeling of completion for the type of the song it is. Peppy, well sung, nice.

The Next track, bin tere we mahi, sung by Master Salim and Richa Sharma is a nice Qawwali’ish composition and though there is nothing much new in the song, it’s worth a listen as the singers have done a good job here.

The last track of the album, Chand wahi hai, is a nice sounding, seen and heard so many times, romantic track sung by Javed Ali and Shreya Ghoshal. Okay end to the album.

Overall, the album is not great and is kinda insignificant, but is not as bad as I had expected it to be. Sanjeev Darshan are yet to be good enough to compete with today’s composers and to an extent, still have to come out of ’90s phase, but it was a nice try from them here.

Singham: Music Review (Ajay-Atul)

Ajay-Atul might be a new name for an average Hindi music listener, but for those who are into Marathi music in the slightest, Ajay Gogavale and Atul Gogavale are definitely not new. After their smaller stints in Hindi movies like Viruddh, finally they are here in a popular, big budget typical Bollywood movie, Rohit Shetty’s Singham. And they seem good here as well.

The album starts with the title song, sung by none other than Sukhwinder Singh. Sukhiji, who has Omkara and Dabangg to his credits, gets even more serious here and the song does not only have a catchy title rhythm, but a good antara as well, giving us a quality title song. Sukhwinder’s voice has been given some effects here, but interestingly, the rock-solid voice is sounding good with them as well. Nice start.

Badmash Dil. Oops, Saathiya. Well, whatever be the title of the song, Ajay-Atul come up with a superbly lovely romantic number sung by Shreya Ghoshal, supported by Ajay Gogavale himself, giving it a breeze that is nowadays found only in Mohit Chauhan’s songs. Do listen to it.

The last, yes, the third and the last original song of the album, has a relatively unthinkable combination of Richa Sharma and Kunal Ganjawala who sing Maula Maula together. The song has a Qawwali-ish mood though it’s not a full-fledged Qawwali, but what is best in the song is that the melody and the overall music of the song are good and while likable at the first listening, the song will still take time to completely grow on you.

Another good thing about the album is that out of three, two remixes also sound more-than-average, and the third isn’t bad either.

In short, Singham is an album to listen to. Do buy, do listen.

Coke Studio India. June 17th. 7 PM. MTV.

Coke Studio is finally in India. And while there may be questions about the credibility of the show and comparisons to its much older Pakistani counterpart, I am quite hopeful and almost sure that this will be a wonderful experience for us.

For now, here is some detail about the show, mostly about who all are gonna be there on the show.

The show will have twenty artistes. While the top Bollywood line of the show comprises of Shankar Mahadevan, Shaan, KK and Sunidhi Chauhan, we’ll also see Kailash Kher, Richa Sharma, Shruti Pathak, and Benny Dayal from Bollywood singers.

Besides, there will be Raghu Dixit, or should I say The Raghu Dixit Project, the well known name from Bangalore; once so popular Colonial Cousins – Hariharan and Leslie Lewis; comparatively lesser known Bollywood singers Harshdeep Kaur and Akriti Kakkar (Harshdeep is winner of two television reality shows and has even sung for A R Rahman in Rang De Basanti, Akriti has almost twenty movies to her credit where she has sung); and the singer of mora saiyyan, aankhon kay sagar, mitwa, and many more, Shafqat Amanat Ali Khan.

Then there are Sabri Brothers*, Aftab and Hashim Sabri, qawwali singers who have sung for Hindi films as well, my best memory being of Allah Allah from Yeh Dil Ashiqana (no idea how crappy the movie was but the songs were good, the qawwali being one of the best) and Tumse mil ke dil ka hai jo haal from Main hoon na.

Also the show will have Sufi singers Puranchand and Pyarelal Wadali i.e. Wadali Brothers there too. The pair has also sung a couple of songs for Bollywood, the latest being Rangrez in Tanu weds Manu.

In lesser known singers, which could and should make the real life of the show, there will be Assamese Bihu specialist Khagen Gogoi, Tamilnadu’s once-a-singer-at-thirteen Chinna Ponnu, another Assamese Mausam Gogoi, maker of boatmen band Majhi Mallah Saurav Mandal and New Delhi’s eclectic music group Advaita.

What is still a confusion though, is that while the list above is given on the ‘Artists’ page of the Coke Studio website, there is another sentence that says ‘The collaborations are so eclectic as to bring together Shafqat Ali and Shruti Pathak, Sunidhi Chauhan and Wadali Brothers, Kailash Kher and Papon, Shankar Mahadevan and Khogen Da, and Bombay Jayshree, Richa Sharma and Rashid Khan among others‘ while going by the list, I won’t find Papon, Bombay Jayshree and Rashid Khan on the show.

* My guess is that there is some mix up regarding them on the Coke Studio’s official website, they claim that Sabri Brothers are a Pakistani Qawwali party.

Thank You: Music Review

Anees Bazmee definitely does things in an upside down way. That’s how there is Thank You after Welcome. This one again comes from the Pritam’s Factory of Dance-n-forget Music. Here comes a review.

The album starts with Mika’s Pyaar do Pyaar lo, that you might have caught on TV. The oldie-newie song sounds more like a remix and looks very much like a try to redo apni to jaise taise from Housefull. I guess Pritam has been successful, but not so much as SEL were with theirs.

The next song, Razia, is sung by Saleem and Ritu Pathak, but Saleem can be confused for a girl with his high pitch here. Allah bachaye meri jaan ki razia gundon mein phans gayi sounds like a typical item song and Ritu sounds pretty good with her singing. Nothing new, just another good product from the Factory.
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Patiala House: Music Review (Shankar Ehsaan Loy)

Laung da Lishkara is something that is definitely going to be a hit. A beautifully created Punjabi song by Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy. The not-too-fast pace of the song is lovely, and how you still don’t want it to be fast and furious is the quality of the music here. The main singer, Jassi seems like a new voice here.

The next, Kyun Main Jaagoon by Shafqat Amanat Ali Khan maybe a bit too slow for loving it the first time, but as you listen to it, you love it more and more. A beautiful track with the background music that slowly grows inside the track. The unplugged version of the song is equally good. Oh, pain in Shafaqat’s voice sounds so very natural in here.

Mehndi vi mehndi, mehndi vi mehndi. Gaadha rang je chadhiya te balle ve balle. I am reminded of Kal ho naa ho. And then of Ajab Prem ki Gazab Kahani as Hard Kaur comes in, and then Shankar Mahadevan sounds all in mad-dance mode. Well, the song sounds a bit broken at the start, but once you’re used to it, the song is definitely gonna rock you. Raula pai gaya. Raula pai gaya. Dil se gaya. Raula pai gaya.

Khwabon ke lifafon mein, kisson mein kitabon mein, Vishal Dadlani sings aadat hai woh in his soft-husky voice. Well, I was surprised quite pleasantly, but a bit confused too as to why Vishal was singing this, and then when I heard usko banane wala kuch kuch to behka hoga, I knew Vishal was the perfect singer for the song. Lovely music, superb lyrics, deep singing. Woh aadat hai is a song with some poetry. I loved it, probably the most in the album, almost as much as Kyun Main Jaagoon. Do listen.

Baby when you talk to me is one more song in the Bollywood rock. This one is sung by Suraj and the way he sings it, it reminds me of Sadka kiya, though the song is not much like that one. Simple tune, and very instantly likable.

The next song, Tumba Tumba tudak gaya, is a kinda slow Punjabi-mixed dance number which stands out for its simplicity. Hans Raj Hans does a beautiful job at this one. The song may not be the best thing when you listen to it the first time, but slowly it takes up its space in your head. Also, have hopes from the video of the video.

Kailash Kher. Richa Sharma. OK. Kailash isn’t here this time, but Richa Sharma sings the mukhda of the bhajan Kailash sang for Road to Sangam. Aval Allah. A small track for the background. Not the full bhajan though, sadly.

The next thing is the remix of kyun main jaagoon. I’m not much into remixes, but quite loved this one. Try once even if you don’t listen to remixes.

The last, baby when you talk to me remix isn’t bad either, probably because there are no huge changes made in the song and speed seems to be the same.

Oh, forgot Raula pai gaya remix. Totally enjoying it.

Overall, Patiala House may not be among the best of Shankar Ehsaan Loy, but like most of their albums, the album has some freshness, and some good ol’ things. To say the least, Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy, once again, don’t disappoint. 🙂

Action Replayy: Music Review

Pritam’s Action Replayy starts with a Zor ka Jhatka given by Daler ‘paaji’ along with Richa Sharma. The now-so-sober Daler goes all mad in the song and you can hear him singing words like shaadi ke mandap se khud ko tu bhaga. Anyway, the song has a punch and Daler does make it even more wonderful. Richa’s nasal avatar makes the song more interesting than anything and what you get is an addictive song that will keep running everywhere for some time.

The next song O Bekhabar seems to be on the lines of Tum jo aaye of OUATIM and even though in this one Shreya sings alone (as compared to tum jo aaye’s Tulsi-Rahat) she sounds good enough to equal the hit. Likeable song.

The third song, Nakhre, sung by Francois Castollino, is a step ahead of zor ka jhatka when it comes to lyrics. The song has some matter-of-fact lyrics (according to boys that is) which can make you laugh even before you reach the theater to watch the movie. Definitely interesting, again.
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Hello Darling: Music Review (Pritam)

Pritam is something like the name of a national Cricket team. Just like countries have a national team and then a second grade national ‘A’ team for some tours, we have ‘Pritam’s music’ and then ‘Pritam A’s music’ for some movies. This one is Pritam A.

I was wondering if I should even listen to the album but then I thought of Sharman Joshi and Tabu’s Toh Baat Pakki and decided to give it a shot. Here is the result, nothing great.
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Sadiyaan: Music Review

Raj Kanwar’s Sadiyaan has Adnan Sami as its music director. Now while most of the songs of the song are quite usual, Adnan ropes in a lot of singers in what seems like a try to make it look varied. Many of the song can also be found using Adnan’s trademark Tabla/other instruments with restrains, somewhat like in Bheegi Bheegi raaton mein or most songs of Lucky. The only thing I liked in the compositions of Adnan here is that the tunes are mostly melodious and some of his songs are likable even with his typical style’s strong presence.
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My Name is Khan: Music Review

2010 is turning out to be great in terms of music. While Veer was unexpectedly good, Ishqiya was HUGE and My Name is Khan is not disappointing either. The album, composed by Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy, has six songs, no remixes, Shankar Mahadevan in three of them but none sung alone by him. Names of Rahat Fateh Ali Khan, Shafqat Amanat Ali, and Rashid Khan make clear from the very start that the album is majorly Sufi. Here is a review of MNIK.
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Sajda: My name is Khan (Richa Sharma, Rahat Fateh Ali Khan)

So the promos of My Name is Khan are finally out. And so have some pieces of music from here and there. I got a 3 and half minute clip of the song and some additional information. The song sounds good as Rahat Fateh Ali Khan sings for a full fledged SRK movie once again after Om Shanti Om, this time with Richa. Looks like Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy are ready to come back with a bang in 2010 after a comparatively dull 2009. Here is more:
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