Anjaana Anjaani. Musical Surprise.

The very first on Anjaana Anjaani. After IHLS I was somehow expecting pretty high from the album, but Vishal-Shekhar go beyond my expectations. It’s certainly worth a listen.

The album starts with Anjaana Anjaani ki Kahani which is already there on televisions for quite sometime. While the short promo of the song rocks, the song, sung by Monali and Nikhil D’Souza offers a bit more and you get something that is sure shot party material.

The second, Hairat, is a hairat for me. I mean, surprise. Not that I was expecting anything less with Lucky Ali there but the way he sings so lively at the age of 51 simply amazes me. And then, before I start on Lucky’s singing, another thing that amazed me in the album was Vishal Dadlani’s lyrics. He’s always been good with lyrics of kinda fun and rocking songs, but here he impresses with his poetry. As for Lucky’s singing and V-S composition, will it suffice to say that I find it difficult to move to the next song?

Anyway, I move to the next and I’m welcomed by Rahat Fateh Ali Khan’s Aas Paas Khuda is typical and good. Something that I’m repeating about Rahat songs a lot, but then I guess Rahat is being kinda stereotyped compared to his immense talent for whatsoever reasons. Still, like most of the times, Vishal-Shekhar add some bits here and there trying to make things more interesting, and I’d say it works. In short, a typical Rahat song of the times we live in.

I have always been a fan of Vishal and Shekhar’s voices, and so the next song Tumse hi Tumse is a treat for me. As the song starts with guitar, I think for a moment if something like Bin Tere unplugged was coming, but the moment passes quickly and the song turns into what I’d say a Lucky’ish mode as soon as Shekhar starts singing. Caralisa’s quite fast English (rap?) sounds interesting to say the least, but the hero of this one is Shekhar Ravjiani. He’s going to get more people saying, ‘This is for you Shekhar!’ Oh, btw, the end of the song has some nice effects on Caralisa’s voice. This simple but beautiful one is a must listen.

As far as I remember, while the world was (and is) standing in queue outside Mohit Chauhan’s home, Vishal-Shekhar were doing it pretty fine without the guy and now that they make him sing a composition of theirs, he gets more than what you can say a typical Mohit Chauhan song. This time Mohit comes with a sad song, Tujhe Bhula Diya. The best part of the song though, for me, was Shruti Pathak’s wonderful start where she sings with near-zero background music. From here on Mohit picks up and where he comes to a still, Shekhar comes with an entry somewhat like Jogi Mahi, with the difference that here things don’t get high like that. Anyway, the point is that the song sounds good from the very first time and the more you hear it, the more you like it.

The next song, I Feel Good, goes on the well-known rock abilities of Vishal and equally unknown rock abilities of Shilpa Rao. Vishal starts singing the song in his soft voice in a way that for once can sound like Shankar Mahadevan’s voice. And then Vishal and Shilpa both completely rock me with the song. The interesting thing is that while the song is something normal for Vishal, it’s strange how Shilpa Rao never (with an exception of Woh Ajnabee, to some extent I guess) sang such a song and was kept to soft numbers with (her) heavy voice. I hope to see her to get more rocking numbers now.

Even more interestingly, the next song, which is the title, Anjaana Anjaani, again has Vishal and Shilpa, this time in a bit different mood. It’s not exactly rock but falls somewhere nearby, something like Sadka Kiya. I never had doubts about Vishal’s abilities as singer but the way he goes singing such wonderful songs, I’m bound to say he’s more a complete musician rather than a composer.

The next track happens to be the remix of Tujhe bhula diya. The track doesn’t impress me, but strangely, it strengthens my belief in the original track. Never mind.

And after a noisy sounding remix, the end comes as a beautiful unplugged version of Aas Paas hai Khuda by Rahat Fateh Ali Khan and Shruti Pathak. Strange to see an extra name in an unplugged version, but then, nobody questions a miracle. Though, for some reason unknown to me too, I didn’t find this one as great and superb and marvelous as Shekhar’s version of bin tere in IHLS. Maybe I’m too fascinated by his voice.

Overall, Anjaana Anjaani is a superb soundtrack. V-S align a bit towards rock, and on the negative side, there are a few things that sound repetitive from them (like one inside Tujhe Bhula Diya) but the overall end result is something that you can rock yourself on, dance to, or simply cherish in a relaxing mood, in short, a perfect soundtrack. As I said, more than I expected.

My favorites (as of now): Hairat, I feel good, Anjaana Anjaani (Vishal-Shilpa), Aas Paas Khuda unplugged, Tumse hi Tumse. And the best part, it’s not easy to decide.

Update: As anticipated (written too), Tujhe Bhula Diya is sounding better every time I hear it. So much so that it is probably the most heard song of the album now, beyond the rest.

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Rajneeti: Review

When i was in school and we were asked to write essays on our favourite books i always wrote Mahabharata. There is a saying in Bengali :”Ja nei bharate, ta nei bharate” which means anything that did not find a place in the great epic, does not exist in India. Politics forms the crux of the epic. Dynastic politics, feud over property, power tussle between blood relations make each page of the greatest story ever told so gripping. But an adaptation of the same with Indian electoral politics as the backdrop fails to impress much. Specially so because this film comes from the kitty of Prakash Jha (who had raised the bar of film making with Gangajal). Had Karan Johar made this film i would have been all praises (like i was in MNIK; that film was pathetic too). Rajneeti works because Mahabharata works.

I will not go into the story of the film. I would just try to talk about certain aspects of the film which if absent could have made Rajneeti a classic. First is the screenplay. In the first half of the film it almost resembles a Yash raj drama! Specially the scenes between Ranbir and Katrina! The scenes went by too fast and editing was really bad which hampered the flow of the film. The songs were complete misfit and could have been given a miss! Prakash Jha should really learn how to use songs as background scores. Some concepts were cliche ridden. Dialogues were stale in most parts and evoked laughter in some serious scenes (like “tum mere jyesth putra ho”). The director’s attempt to adapt Mahabharata boomerangs. He lets many strings loose which becomes very difficult for him to sort out by the end of the film.

This is an extract of Aagan‘s review. Complete Review at Aaganzworld.

Update: I watched Raajneeti and absolutely loved it. My suggestion, Do watch it, if you like or have any interest in that bad game called Politics. I have. 🙂

Mora Piya – Rajneeti

Oops! That sounds good. I just happened to see a flicker of Rajneeti’s song Mora Piya on television and in the very first time, it sounded Kinda good. As I searched, I got to know that the song was composed and sung by Aadesh Srivastava. No debate again on whether Aadesh Srivastava is underrated or not.
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Rajneeti: Trailer

Prakash Jha’s Rajneeti might be awaited, but NOW, it will be really awaited. I think we need such trailers for movies to be hit. The trailer reminds me of Mahabhrat (intendedly, of course) with a wonderful voice over that sounds like that by Nana Patekar. Well, no discussions on that for now. Watch the trailer. Listen to the voice over. To Vande Mataram. And wait for May 28th.
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Movie Review: Rocket Singh – Salesman of the Year

Warning: Rocket Singh Salesman of the Year is NOT Chak De India.

Rocket Singh is not a typical Yash Raj product. It’s real time, not larger than life, and it has small people. The way Rocket Singh says in the advertisement, 37 percent, with grace marks. So do not expect a Shahrukh Khan who spreads his hands and the world falls between them. Rocket Singh is not about Spiderman, it’s about a salesman.

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Ranbir Kapoor at Forum, Bangalore

It was the first time I got to see a movie celebrity. And it happened to be Ranbir Kapoor, who had come to Forum Value Mall at Whitefield here for the promotion of Rocket Singh. When I entered the mall at 3.30, the mall was already full of fans.

Forum administration had set a small stage in the center and were passing the time with random acts till the star arrived. During that time even I got some share of stage and sang a few lines. While a young-at-heart telecom called Raja stole the show with a wonderful rendering of kora kagaz tha ye man mera.

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Ajab Prem ki Ghazab Kahani: Movie Review

If you think Rajkumar Santoshi is the director of so-serious-movies like Ghayal, Damini, China Gate, Pukar, Lajja, Legend of Bhagat Singh and Khakee, you are missing something. He’s the man who gave us Andaz Apna Apna. And now he’s there with Ajab Prem ki Ghajab Kahani.

Ajab Prem ki Ghazab Kahani

OK. Frankly, Andaz Apna Apna is a classic and nobody, I repeat, nobody can make it again. So let’s see APKGK from a new frame.

First things first. All good movies don’t need things like mind and reasoning. APKGK is one of those movies.

The movie starts on a light note with Ranbir Kapoor, or Prem, the President of Happy Continue reading “Ajab Prem ki Ghazab Kahani: Movie Review”