Dabangg 2: Music Review [Sajid-Wajid]

Dabangg 2 seems to be beginning where Dabangg ended. Don’t know how much of Abhinav Kashyap’s magic is going to be there with Arbaaz, but at least music seems to tell you very clearly that it’s nothing other than Dabangg 2.

Dagabaaz re, the first song of the album is almost an extension of Tere mast mast do nain, though doesn’t go that high on notes. However, the combination of Salman, Sajid-Wajid and Rahat, and even Shreya, keeps things a lot in Dabangg mood. Lyrics are simple, nice, and in the mood with the music. It’s not mast-mast do nain, but the song is an okay sequel to the superhit track.

Heroine: Music Review (Salim-Sulaiman)

If you had suddenly got some big hopes from Salim-Sulaiman like I did, this might be a disappointment for you.

Yes, Salim-Sulaiman seem to have got the best of their creativity in Halkat Jawani itself. Even though Heroine is not exactly something to discard and has a few good things, Salim-Sulaiman are finally looking like a spent force and probably not looking for a comeback.

With that negative note, let me start a review that I hope is not biased against them.

And so, let’s begin with Khwahishen, which is probably the best song of the album. A ‘new’ (all terms are relative) song from Salim-Sulaiman, sung by Shreya Ghoshal, it’s a nice compostion with some above good lyrics. Zindagi ko dheere dheere dasti hain khwahishen is something I’d go for. Nothing special for Shreya as such, but she anyway sings it well. Worth listening to, at least.

The next song, the last in the album (but not in the review) is Tujhpe Fida. A song that already sounds like a remixed pop number, but does sound nice. Benny Dayal is almost a default choice for the song, and Shaddha Pandit does fine here. Still, with all the arrangements in the song, cannot help feeling it lies a lot somewhere between Aadat se Majboor n Thug Le.

Halkat Jawani. Frankly, item songs in general don’t interest me much anymore. Don’t know if Mamta Munni Sharma (or excess of her voice, everywhere) is the cause, but the result is what it is. Still, Halkat Jawani was something that kinda gripped me. The composition is simple, catchy, and Sunidhi’s singing is just superb. I mean, I think to a large extent she’s the one responsible for making most of our heroines worth their ‘salt’, literally. Not saying much about the song, I liked the song and loved Sunidhi there. And yes Salim-Sulaiman, this was a nice one. Thanks for that.

Saaiyaan. Rahat Fateh Ali Khan. Yeh Hausla Kaise Ruke.

I don’t know how much, but the song is a lot of ye hausla and I could only hear Dor in the song for the first few times. Or more than a few times. So much that I wasn’t able to like the simple lyrics. Salim-Sulaiman seem to have taken re-creation a little too literally here. However, other than that, the song in itself is good. With most other songs of this type (which sound like a clone/copy), it should find its place after some time of being called a clone.

Main Heroine Hoon. You can probably guess what type of the song it would be. Something like other Madhur Bhandarkar title songs. But somehow it sounds a little more ordinary, at least in the beginning. The song should go up slowly with promotion which I suppose will be there. As for Aditi, her singing is really nice here. From the uber-softness of katra-katra, she’s reached the attitude of Main heroine hoon quite well.

So overall, even though not really make me believe in Salim-Sulaiman, is fairly okay. Halkat Jawani and Khwahishen are nice, and despite problems, so is Saaiyaan. The rest are kinda okay. Short, crisp, not too good, but well, manageable.

Tezzz: Music Review (Sajid-Wajid)

Recently I was watching an interview of Sonu Nigam. Money was being discussed and Sonu was asked if there are music directors for whom he sings for free at times. And the answer was yes, but the first name he took was a bit of a surprise for me. It was none other than Sajid-Wajid. Not like I don’t have reasons to believe they are good composers or Sonu Nigam shouldn’t enjoy great relationship with them (he got his biggest pop hit, Deewana, from Sajid-Wajid), but it just wasn’t a big enough name somehow. I think that’s gonna change now.

Yep. Sajid-Wajid sound like a very ’90s composers at times, but their greatness exists in the fact that even when they sound like ’90s, they are so good with it that you end up loving them. The only problems they have had is that they have not really been very consistent, and of course, they haven’t had very big names to work with, with a regular exception of Salman Khan. The latter is changing, and I hope that the former changes too.

OK that was a long prologue for a small album with just four original tracks, though there are twelve versions on the disk. So here we go on Tezzz.

The album starts with the gem of a song called Tere bina tere bina dil naiyo lagda, sung by Rahat Fateh Ali Khan. A nice melody, and quite some Nadeem-Shravan’ish treatment is what the song has, but neither of the two is mediocre and some simple singing from Rahat is enough to make the song lovable. And that is what it is. Lovely.

Tezzz title song sung by Sunidhi is an average number, with a little Abbas-Mustan feel to it, which seems to be going with the movie. Sunidhi’s singing is good here, but the results are more or less just okay. Maybe the song will be liked a bit more with time and promotion.

Mohit Chauhan singing for Sajid-Wajid is something rare, if not a first. However, the duo give the master singer a song that fits his voice perfectly and the treatment is more or less the same as he generally gets from Pritam, with an added Chorus for him singing tere saaye mein, which makes the romantic song more devotional. A simple, light, romantic number, with the added chorus adding a little more to the song.

Laila, the next by Sunidhi is an average number again, and somehow after not liking it after listening to it a few times, didn’t feel like listening to it more. Passable.

For the next track, Shreya Ghoshal comes to sing Tere bina tere bina, which sounds perfectly good, but a little more ‘old’, a little more ’90s. Probably because Rahat’s adds a little twist to a song, you don’t feel it so much in the male version. However, worth a listen for sure. Do listen and decide for yourself if you like this one more.

Shaan’s version of Tezzz is not really great. Wondering if this could have been given to KK. Not sticking much on remixes, I shift towards the sad version of Tere Bina, which I presume could be better with a few more twists thrown in with that simplicity. The last thing I would like to say a little about is Tere Bina (Indian) version. Sudden thought: It’s still Rahat singing, so how’s it more Indian? Well, jokes apart, the version is a little more towards Aashiqui as beats come more from the Tabla here and that IS nice, but I think a little more Indianization of the version could make things more interesting.

Overall, Tezzz has got quite some nice music from Sajid-Wajid, even if it doesn’t go equally in all the songs. Other than that, the album has got a little too many versions. I think if you don’t want to go into much and want to get the sure shot numbers, go for Rahat’s version of Tere Bina and Mohit’s Main hoon shab. And if it’s a little more, you can try the Indian version and Shreya’s version as well.

Azaan/ Aazaan: Music Review (Salim-Sulaiman)

If you too feel that Salim’s Afreen is kinda repetitive and sounds a little like Fashion’s Marjaava, go listen to Rahat’s unplugged version of the song. Salim-Sulaiman once again do quality stuff with Rahat. My only say after the version is that the original version could have been given to Rahat as well.

The next track, Khuda ke liye, is again quite templated and very typical of Salim-Sulaiman, but is lovely nonetheless. Shraddha Pandit’s voice is innocent and sounds nice. The song might not be too fresh, but is certainly worth listening to.
Continue reading “Azaan/ Aazaan: Music Review (Salim-Sulaiman)”

Mausam (2011): Music Review (Pritam)

13 tracks. 6 original songs. 11 singers. With some singing more than one song and some songs getting different singers for different versions. In short, Pritam does his best to create a full mix and match combination, and the results seem pretty good. There we go with a review.

Rabba main to mar gaya oye. Shahid Mallya. A nice song with lovely, romantic lyrics and Shahid Mallya’s slightly husky voice goes quite well with the light music of the song with a little Punjabi touch. Good start.

The second song may remind you of thoda thoda pyaar with its video and initial arrangements, but once Mika gets into singing saj dhaj ke tashan mein rehna, you know it’s a typical Mika thing where you can lose yourself and dance like mad. I may be biased here, but I kinda loved Pankaj Kapur’s single line entry here.

Next comes Hans Raj Hans with ik tu hi tu hi, a sad song which not only boasts of some nice arrangements and lovely use of chorus (should I say a bit Rahman’ish), but also some beautiful lyrics from Irshad Kamil. Do listen to this one. I am wondering at how composers are turning to Hans raj Hans for serious stuff like this one or rather how it didn’t happen much earlier.

The next treat comes from Rashid Khan who sounds in his full color as he sings Poore se zara sa kam hain. I must applaud Pritam here for giving Rashid full command over the song as the latter sings without any background for the first minute and later also goes in a very Indian arrangement. Another good thing, you find no adulterated (politically correct: remixed) versions of the song. Do listen.

Karsan Sargathiya’s aag lage us aag ko has more than a touch of folk, especially with Dholi Taaro man Karsan’s singing. Okay this one.

Hard Kaur’s entry in the serious album sounds a bit sudden/strange/abrupt, but soon Tochi Raina takes over with an almost new avatar as he sings Mallo Malli naal yaar de, a lovely Punjabi dance number for the youth to dance on. Not a very mature song going by the standard of the album yet, but still quite interesting and listenable, or should I say danceable.

After the original songs start remixes, reprises and more. First one, Rabba, with Rahat here. Needless to say, the version is nice, but I was equally ok with Shahid Mallya’s version. In fact with nothing special for/by Rahat here, I’d prefer Shahid’s version.

After Singh is Kinng, Tiger style come in to remix for Mika’s Saj Dhaj ke, in a desi mix and a club mix, both of which don’t sound too great, but are good for dancing at parties.

Next comes a reprise version of ik tu hi tu, which is sung by Shahid Mallya this time, and the guy kind of impresses me, as he sounds as good as Hans Raj Hans did for the song. But what is a surprise here is the next version of the song, sung by Wadali Brothers. The Mehfil Mix sounds nice and quite different from the original. But then again, do not compare with Rangrez.

At the end there are two versions of Mallo Malli, which are sung by Lehember Hussainpuri with Hard Kaur and Tochi Raina alone respectively, which look a bit too much as so many repetitions were probably not required.

Overall Mausam is a really nice album from Pritam with at least four songs out of six in the ‘very good’ category. While almost the entire album seems to have a Punjabi touch, there is still variety in the songs, and not only in terms of singers used. So my verdict is: buy it, listen to it.

Lyrics from MAUSAM

Mere Brother ki Dulhan: Music Review (Sohail Sen)

Sohail Sen for the first time gets something worthwhile outside Ashutosh Gowariker’s camp, and he looks keen on making it big. Here is a review of his entry into YRF, Mere Brother ki Dulhan.

The album starts with the title song Mere Brother ki Dulhan, a fast paced, quickly addictive, likable number with some interesting lyrics from Irshad Kaamil sung by KK.

I was still in the first song when a chorus broke into some rocky words and Neha Bhasin into Dhunki Dhunki Dhunki laage. While the music is lovely, it’s Neha who surprises me with her lovely singing here. She’s been good in some Salim-Sulaiman songs earlier, in Fashion, as well as Pyaar Impossible, but this could be the song that would restate her entry into Hindi film industry.

The next song Chhoo Mantar is, I would say, a typical Sohail Sen piece, with his signature beats, and if I didn’t know it from the cover, I’d say is sung by him as well. Yes, it’s bad how I still don’t get Benny Dayal’s voice after so many of his songs that I completely love. Aditi Singh Sharma is as soft and husky with her voice here as she always is.

Isq Risk, the next song, sung by Rahat Fateh Ali Khan, gives a little small surprise in the beginning as you hear a radio (read AIR) style prologue to the song, telling whose music and words the song has. Sohail Sen’s melody is a bit ’90s in its treatment, but with Rahat singing, the song sounds pretty nice. Irshad Kamil’s words are lovely here.

Ali Zafar’s only entry in the soundtrack, Madhubala is simply enjoyable. I don’t think I want to use any other word for the song. It’s his signature ‘Masti’ that literally shows up here, nicely supported by Shweta Pandit.

Shahid Mallya, another name that is a bit new for me, is growing up quite fast nowadays. After Naina wali Whiskey in Sahi Dhandhe Galat Bande and with Mausam lined up for him, it’s the third place I have seen his name in this week, for Do Dhaari Talwar here. The song, with a little Punjabi flavor in it, mostly because of Shahid’s singing style and percussion based arrangements, is quite fast paced and enjoyable, though doesn’t look like very long lasting.

Overall, MBKD is a typical Yashraj album with songs that will be liked instantly by the public. Be it the title song or Dhunki, Isq risk or Madhubala, the composer is quite clear on what he wants the song to do and I feel that it would be a big plus for the movie. Go buy it if you like typical hit soundtracks of Bollywood.

PS: One interesting thing about the album is that even though Yashraj use a new composer here, many of the singers are the ones who have sung a lot for YRF, with their regular composers Salim-Sulaiman, especially Benny Dayal, Neha Bhasin and Shweta Pandit.

Bodyguard: Music Review (Himesh Reshammiya, Pritam)

In Bodyguard title song, Salman tries to get a Dhinka chika done by Himesh and of course, success doesn’t come, not properly at least. But then the song can do well as a ‘title’ song, making a good background for the movie, and trailers.

Mika’s Desi beat is a nice try at a dance number, and the song should do fine, but again, Himesh doesn’t do any magic here, leaving me a bit disappointed.

What beats everything though, is Pritam’s I love you, sung by Ash King with Clinton Cerejo. Ash is not the best when it comes to diction and things like ‘main’ becoming almost ‘mein’ are common, but still his version sounds better than Shaan’s Unplugged. Typical of Pritam but lovely.

The next, Rahat and Shreya’s Teri meri meri teri prem kahani is a song with a complex, but lovely melody. The Himesh Reshammiya composition might take some time to grow on one, but sounds lovely nonetheless. In that context it reminds me of Anjaana Anjaani title track (by Vishal n Shilpa) though there is hardly any similarilty between the two. The unplugged version of the song is a little more interesting, though it doesn’t really seem necessary with the actual song quite easy on ears already. Nice sung by Rahat.

Overall, Bodyguard is not as good as I had expected, especially from Himesh. Though Pritam tries to make things better. And does that.

Buy Bodyguard Audio CD Here.

Ready: Music Review (Pritam)

Ishaq ke naam par karte sabhi ab raasleela hain, Main karoon to saala character dheela hai. While Neeraj Shridhar and Pritam are at it again, Amitabh Bhattacharya makes his presence very clearly felt in the song with his witty pen this time. Listen to this one: farak padta hai kya baahon mein munni hai ya sheela hai. Go for it.

Wait, was it Pritam rendering those English lines at the start of this wonderful song? It should have been Neeraj to start this romantic treat from KK, the song that’s called Humko Pyar hua. Not much to say, this one is good again. Go for this as well.

Enter DSP. THE Devi Sri Prasad with his only composition for Ready 2011, sung by Mika. I knew only one Ringa ringa in Telugu and as soon as I started the song, it was unmistakably the one. And I must say that the dhinka chika remake is not bad. Gives me the feel of the original song to quite an extent, probably as close as it could be. What is to be seen is how well the song fits Bollywood, cause I still imagine a typical Telugu movie background with the song. I’m in for this one.

Enter long vacha at the start. Enter must-dance-on-this DJ. Enter RFAK. In a whole just-dance mood, with his awesomely superb singing. Enter Tulsi with her can-somehow-sing-well-with-RFAK mood. Awesome song.

OK. Maybe I said too much about that last song, meri ada bhi aaj kya kar gayi, but frankly, I loved the song and Rahat Fateh Ali Khan singing in that mixture of long-vacha and some more pieces of popular Punjabi songs with that good melody at that fast pace, making a good thing to dance on, or simply listen to, as you like it.

Since I didn’t find anything special in the remixes, that is kinda all I have to say about the album, which actually isn’t less in any way. The album has just four songs and while all four are good, they are also different in their style and representation. While Pritam sticks to formula in Character Dheela, there is some experimentation added in Meri ada bhi, KK is good as ever and DSP’s composition is almost all new to Bollywood listeners. In short, it seems the music is ready to rock you, are you Ready?

Music Review: Knock Out

Gourov Das Gupta gets a number of big singers in Knock Out, a fact that makes me expect more from him this time. He reaches some of the expectations, but not all. Here is a review.

The album starts with a rock-based title song sung by Vishal Dadlani. Vishal is fine in the song but the song seems to be a bit picked from here and there and rest just added to make up a song. Some traces of Paathshala’s Khushnuma can be found which become all the more visible with Vishal singing the song. Not for listening but might sound ok in the movie as a background number.

After disappointing in the first song, Gourov DG makes a comeback with the next song that is sung by Rahat Fateh Ali Khan. The song comes as a surprise as Rahat sings a song which is not too similar to the songs he’s singing left right and center nowadays. A slower and deeper track with a slight touch of rock that gets fast and enraging in the middle, Khushnuma sa ye roshan ho is something definitely above his own average by the composer. Good one.
Continue reading “Music Review: Knock Out”

Aakrosh: I say Yes.

When the world was getting blown away with Rahman’s Jhootha hi Sahi, Pritam’s Aakrosh came out too, and it was good to see I was liking the songs even with Call me Dil running in my mind already. Without saying a lot, I start the review.

The album starts with Tere isak se meetha kuch bhi nahi. The Item number sung by Kalpana Patowary with Ajay Jhingaran is quite good and the girl’s voice shines in the very start, though later on the voice sounds a bit pressed under the instruments. Still, one more hit in the list UP-Bihar songs is ready. 🙂

The second song, Saude Bazi by Anupam Amod is a surprise from the first note sung by the chorus. A beautifully arranged composition by Pritam, I felt the song should go a long way, right when I heard it for the first time. Soft, Romantic, with a different voice, and lovely lyrics. What else would one want. Superb.
Continue reading “Aakrosh: I say Yes.”

Anjaana Anjaani. Musical Surprise.

The very first on Anjaana Anjaani. After IHLS I was somehow expecting pretty high from the album, but Vishal-Shekhar go beyond my expectations. It’s certainly worth a listen.

The album starts with Anjaana Anjaani ki Kahani which is already there on televisions for quite sometime. While the short promo of the song rocks, the song, sung by Monali and Nikhil D’Souza offers a bit more and you get something that is sure shot party material.

The second, Hairat, is a hairat for me. I mean, surprise. Not that I was expecting anything less with Lucky Ali there but the way he sings so lively at the age of 51 simply amazes me. And then, before I start on Lucky’s singing, another thing that amazed me in the album was Vishal Dadlani’s lyrics. He’s always been good with lyrics of kinda fun and rocking songs, but here he impresses with his poetry. As for Lucky’s singing and V-S composition, will it suffice to say that I find it difficult to move to the next song?

Anyway, I move to the next and I’m welcomed by Rahat Fateh Ali Khan’s Aas Paas Khuda is typical and good. Something that I’m repeating about Rahat songs a lot, but then I guess Rahat is being kinda stereotyped compared to his immense talent for whatsoever reasons. Still, like most of the times, Vishal-Shekhar add some bits here and there trying to make things more interesting, and I’d say it works. In short, a typical Rahat song of the times we live in.

I have always been a fan of Vishal and Shekhar’s voices, and so the next song Tumse hi Tumse is a treat for me. As the song starts with guitar, I think for a moment if something like Bin Tere unplugged was coming, but the moment passes quickly and the song turns into what I’d say a Lucky’ish mode as soon as Shekhar starts singing. Caralisa’s quite fast English (rap?) sounds interesting to say the least, but the hero of this one is Shekhar Ravjiani. He’s going to get more people saying, ‘This is for you Shekhar!’ Oh, btw, the end of the song has some nice effects on Caralisa’s voice. This simple but beautiful one is a must listen.

As far as I remember, while the world was (and is) standing in queue outside Mohit Chauhan’s home, Vishal-Shekhar were doing it pretty fine without the guy and now that they make him sing a composition of theirs, he gets more than what you can say a typical Mohit Chauhan song. This time Mohit comes with a sad song, Tujhe Bhula Diya. The best part of the song though, for me, was Shruti Pathak’s wonderful start where she sings with near-zero background music. From here on Mohit picks up and where he comes to a still, Shekhar comes with an entry somewhat like Jogi Mahi, with the difference that here things don’t get high like that. Anyway, the point is that the song sounds good from the very first time and the more you hear it, the more you like it.

The next song, I Feel Good, goes on the well-known rock abilities of Vishal and equally unknown rock abilities of Shilpa Rao. Vishal starts singing the song in his soft voice in a way that for once can sound like Shankar Mahadevan’s voice. And then Vishal and Shilpa both completely rock me with the song. The interesting thing is that while the song is something normal for Vishal, it’s strange how Shilpa Rao never (with an exception of Woh Ajnabee, to some extent I guess) sang such a song and was kept to soft numbers with (her) heavy voice. I hope to see her to get more rocking numbers now.

Even more interestingly, the next song, which is the title, Anjaana Anjaani, again has Vishal and Shilpa, this time in a bit different mood. It’s not exactly rock but falls somewhere nearby, something like Sadka Kiya. I never had doubts about Vishal’s abilities as singer but the way he goes singing such wonderful songs, I’m bound to say he’s more a complete musician rather than a composer.

The next track happens to be the remix of Tujhe bhula diya. The track doesn’t impress me, but strangely, it strengthens my belief in the original track. Never mind.

And after a noisy sounding remix, the end comes as a beautiful unplugged version of Aas Paas hai Khuda by Rahat Fateh Ali Khan and Shruti Pathak. Strange to see an extra name in an unplugged version, but then, nobody questions a miracle. Though, for some reason unknown to me too, I didn’t find this one as great and superb and marvelous as Shekhar’s version of bin tere in IHLS. Maybe I’m too fascinated by his voice.

Overall, Anjaana Anjaani is a superb soundtrack. V-S align a bit towards rock, and on the negative side, there are a few things that sound repetitive from them (like one inside Tujhe Bhula Diya) but the overall end result is something that you can rock yourself on, dance to, or simply cherish in a relaxing mood, in short, a perfect soundtrack. As I said, more than I expected.

My favorites (as of now): Hairat, I feel good, Anjaana Anjaani (Vishal-Shilpa), Aas Paas Khuda unplugged, Tumse hi Tumse. And the best part, it’s not easy to decide.

Update: As anticipated (written too), Tujhe Bhula Diya is sounding better every time I hear it. So much so that it is probably the most heard song of the album now, beyond the rest.

BUY Anjaana Anjaani from Flipkart

Music Review: Dabannggg!!!!

The album starts with a wonderful Tere mast mast do nain sung by Rahat Fateh Ali Khan and Shreya Ghoshal. As Rahat sings the yet another beuatiful tune composed by Sajid-Wajid, it’s clear the composer duo can do better than their usual, and that Veer was not a fluke.

Munni Badnaam hui Darling tere liye is the item number of the album. The most interesting part of the song besides its addictive music is the singing done by Mamta Sharma and Aishwarya. This one is certainly going to rock small town/suburban areas.

Continue reading “Music Review: Dabannggg!!!!”

We Are Family: Another SEL Treat

Another much awaited album from the stable of Karan Johar. Another wonderful listen from Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy. Oh, did I forget Jailhouse rock? 😉

We are Family starts with SEL at their romantic best, as they come up with a typical romantic Aankhon mein neendein sung by Rahat Fateh Ali Khan and Shreya Ghoshal along with Shankar Mahadevan. Irshad Kamil does no breakthrough to lyrics but adds a few beautiful touches to his words here and there. Lovable. A song for the long run.

If you haven’t heard the album yet, reduce the volume a bit before the second song starts. As Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy-KJo-Sid make Kajol kill Elvis with Dil Khol ke let’s rock, it’s clear that the song is definitely not the best thing for a music lover, but the song is certainly a tongue-sticker. Taking the video into account, I’d say Anushka does a wonderful job at being carefree while Akriti is good as a support and singer. The rocker Suraj Jagan sings this one also really well, though the negative point of the same is that he doesn’t sound casual unlike Anushka. Last word, you are anyway not likely to love it the first time, and if you’re an Elvis fan, there is no way at all. But even after all this, the song is going to be a hit, a superhit. After all, it’s Elvis’ music, and recreated by none less than SEL.

Next is the Best. Vishal Dadlani and Shankar Mahadevan come together for a wonderful Reham-O-Karam and the song just rocks. Reham-O-Karam starts with a casual solo rendering by Shankar and then suddenly it all gets rocking. From the on Vishal and Shankar sing Irshad Kamil’s lyrics to the wonderful tune of SEL and it’s Magik. Oops, magic.

Next song happens to be Sonu Nigam and Shreya Ghoshal’s Hamesha and Forever, which is kind of typical with nothing new but just some sweetness that both Sonu and Shreya have in plenty. A soft, slow number that will stick itself with the story of the movie and will keep walking at its own pace. Another one for long runs, but ma take some time to take off. As the name says, Hamesha and Forever.

The last song of the album is Sun le dua yeh aasmaan. The song is pretty slow, even from Karan and Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy’s standards and Bela Shende does a good and pretty tough job as she moves the song alone. As a matter of fact, it’s almost a theme.

The end of the album is, of course, with a theme and this time Karan keeps the privilege for the trio again after MNIK where he had given the theme alone to Strings. It’s a typical, what do I say.

Overall, We Are Family is a predictably good and sweet album from Karan Johar and Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy. Believe me I’m keeping Karan first because that matters more here. And yes, all the three words (predictable-sweet-good) don’t fit with JailHouse Rock. Still, I’m humming it.

Best of the album: I guess Reham-O-Karam, followed by Aankhon mein neendein.

BUY We Are Family from Flipkart.

We are Family: Another similar soundtrack?

I love Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy. But when it comes to Karan Johar, I suddenly become skeptical. I know Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy have given some fabulous music for Karan’s movies from their first song together (Kal ho na ho, title), but somehow I think Karan doesn’t use the full potential of Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy and I think there are several proofs of it. Take any ‘different’ song of Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy and you know it’s not from a Dharma movie (Exceptions are invited).

Now that Karan Johar’s next product We are Family is coming, some of the details are coming out and I’m again getting a feeling that the music of the film will be same again. The typical that happens to be in his movies: one or two songs with a Sufi touch, one party song, like in a bar or something, maybe one philosophical, and quite surely a sad version, and definitely one theme. I think though that after MNIK, WAF also may have one rock-ish number as Suraj Jagan is there again.

For example, I know there is a song called Rehem-o-Karam in the movie and by the very words, I smell a Sufi song. Not that I don’t like Sufi songs but hasn’t he had enough of them in MNIK already? By the way, the song Rehem-o-Karam is sung by Vishal Dadlani along with Shankar Mahadevan. I wish Rehem-o-Karam turns out to be a rock number but chances look kind of bleak.

I know Karan knows what he is doing and I also know that the songs that come out will be wonderful, and at the same time hit, superhit. But I think this way, music loses, and at the end, we lose.

Anyway, all I can do for now is anticipate and guess, until the music release, which is reportedly scheduled for first week of August, though I was expecting end of July, guessing 28th. And all I wish is that I’m proved wrong, and KJo and SEL bring us the best music we have ever heard. Amen.

Update: Here is the detailed soundtrack of the movie.

  1. Ankhon Mein Neendein – Rahat Fateh Ali Khan, Shreya Ghoshal, Shankar Mahadevan (5:02)
  2. Dil Khol Ke Let’s Rock – Anushka Manchanda, Akriti Kakkar, Suraj Jagan (03:57)
  3. Reham O Karam – Vishal Dadlani, Shankar Mahadevan (05:47)
  4. Hamesha & Forever – Sonu Nigam, Shreya Ghoshal, Tara Waaliya (04:51)
  5. Sun Le Dua Yeh Aasmaan (Theme Slow Version) – Shankar Mahadevan (03:53)
  6. We Are Family (Theme) – Dominique Cerejo, Clinton Cerejo, Neuman Pinto, Vivienne Pocha (02:48)

Tere Mast Mast do nain

With Salman Khan’s Dabangg, Sajid Wajid are back, and after the success of Veer’s music, this time they come up with one more song with Rahat Fateh Ali Khan, and this one is called Tere Mast Do Nain. The song is a romantic, melody, with a slight ghazal-ish mode and some beats that are going to stick in your head, and to your tongue.

taakte rehte tujhko saanjh savere,
naino mein basiyaan jaise nain ye tere,
naino mein basiyaan jaise nain ye tere,
tere mast mast do nain,
mere dil ka le gaye chain,
mere dil ka le gaye chain,
tere mast mast do nain..