Music Review: Rush (2012 film, music composed by Pritam)

Pritam and Ash King is turning out to be a winning combination. Once again Pritam gives Ash a similar kind of song, though this time Muazzam Beg n Rizwan Ali Khan make it all interesting. Kahin ye tere dil se to chhup chhup ke milta nahi is definitely worth listening to. Nicely composed. Even better arrangements and that chorus’ singing.

The next, Fukraa is a catchy one sung by Jazzy B with Hard Kaur. The song is simple, with an average melody, but the catchy elemnt is taken care of with some okay arrangements. Not a blockbuster, but will work, especially on dance floors, in remix versions.

The second highlight of the album is called Mumkin Nahi. Instead of reading this, you can listen to the song. Though I didn’t so much like Tulsi’s average singing in the song. The song has a flavor of Tum Mile, with its long, lovely melody, and touching lyrics. But I was most surprised by Anupam Amod, who though sings well always, this time seemed to be kinda close to KK in this rendition. DO listen.

O re khuda is a ballad with some wonderful lyrics again. Don’t yet know the lyricist, though the maqta of the sher at the end names Faraaz. Interestingly, Javed Bashir seems to sing here somewhat in Adnan Sami’s style. Listen to this one for the lyrics, and also Javed’s singing.

With Rab ka Junoon, Pritam brings in full-fledged hard rock (is this metal? not sure.) to Bollywood, the track with very little lyrics and a lot of music was okay for me, though I am hardly into rock. Try this one if you want to try rock. If you’re here, I doubt you’d be someone into full-fledged rock.

The last song, Hote Hote, is a beat based one, more of a pop piece, and again brings in Ash, this time with Hard Kaur. Ash’s part of the song, jo bhi ho, jo bhi ho, is catchy, and does attract you. Also the beats of the song are not unheard, but still okay, will be liked after repeated listening.

The end comes with a repeat of chhup chhup ke, the opening song, with Shaan replacing Ash King. Didn’t really feel a need for this one, but Shaan sounds okay.

Overall, Rush has some really good songs, chhup chhup ke and Mumkin Nahi are must listen. Rest aren’t bad too. Worth a try for all, and worth a buy if you’re a music lover.

Barfi! Music Review (Pritam)

Anurag Basu and Pritam are a team. So much so for me that I generally tend to forget Kites as Anurag’s movie, going back dircetly to Metro, which the two worked on together, and literally rocked.

Here, they come once again, to give you an album, where not a single piece of a single song seems to be touching Metro. Yeah, it’s all, all new.

The album begins with Ala Ala Matwala Barfi. Mohit Chauhan makes some wonderful onomatopoeic noises here, but it’s the simple tune of Pritam that deserves equal credit. Ranbir this time seems to be doing even better than what he did in rockstar, though it’s not really good to compare as the two are very different movies.

Back to the song. I hope you have all heard the first, Mohit Chauhan version of the song. So more on the Swanand Kirkire version. This one didn’t sound THAT interesting to me after Mohit’s version, though Swanand’s solid voice gives a different touch to the song. Sounds more like an old composer singing his song.

Nickhil Paul George (or call him Nikhil if you so prefer) singing Main kya karoon has been my favorite since the day I heard it for the first time, mostly for the vocals, again other than the light, simple arrangements. The singer, who has sung with Ash King, does sound a lot like him, at least in style. Actually this was quite clear with these two songs that Barfi! is gonna be a much lighter album than Metro, or even an average album of nowadays, and so it is.

The third song, Papon and Sunidhi’s Kyon na hum tum is a simple one. Simple as in, with not too much of new elements. Just a simple song with some nice lyrics. The lyrics of the song are actually sweet, the way ‘roopak’ is used in that. Not sure if what exactly is roopak in English, but I can tell you ‘nazar ke kankadon se khamoshi ki khidkiyan yoon todenge’ is roopak twice. That’s the part I loved the most in this one, with Papon’s evergreen singing.

Arijit Singh is Pritam’s favorite singer nowadays. You can pick any of his past five albums to confirm that. And this time he gets a completely different assignment from his mentor. The song, phir le aaya dil, is more like a Ghazal in its treatment, with all the ‘thehraav’ and of course the tabla based arrangements. And Arijit sings it the lovely Urdu piece quite well.

Of course, Pritam doesn’t leave his beautiful song to Arijit alone this time, not in this Ghazal mode, and gets a perfect version done from none other than Rekha Bharadwaj. Need not say she is a killer yet again, right from the VERY first line. No surprises, it’s in her very forte. MUST listen.

One more experimental-beautiful-old-sounding piece is Aashiyan sung by Shreya and Nickhil. Shreya is a little different with her voice here, though Nickhil remains his regular voice only. The arrangement of the song is interesting, in all its old-western touch. So much so that I can see a girl in something like a polka-dotted frock, in almost black-n-white. Yeah, that’s what music can do to you. To me at least. Anyway, you can guess how much I am into the song, and it is worth it. Very sweet-cute types, nature touching lyrics.

The last song of the album (discounting all the repeat versions as I’ve talked about them all) is Saanwali si raat ho, once again sung by Arijit. This one is a very slow, very simple, and very minimally arranged number. The lyrics are wonderfully romantic in this one. Fall in love with them.

OK. So overall Barfi! is very much in tune with what you would have already heard from the album, almost continuing in the same mood (other than Phir le aaya dil), but still giving you enough to stick on to, for quite a long time. The good things about the album are: It’s simple arrangements, beautiful lyrics, quality compositions, and lastly, it’s lack of remixes. Actually remix is something you wouldn’t even think about in this album. It’s a Barfi that you’d like to savour for quite some time.

PS: At times, I felt like this was a Shantanu Moitra album, with all the slow-soulful-remixless music, and Swanand Kirkire’s lyrics. Special accolades for Pritam for doing something that I’d say out of his comfort zone.

Cocktail Music Review (Pritam)

Heavy voices and Light rock, if mixed well, can be the key ingredients of a Bollywood hit today. And this time in Cocktail, Pritam seems to have kept this well in mind. No, not taking any credit away from him for this wonderful album, just trying to understand how it was made.

Tumhi ho Bandhu – what Pritam is.

With Neeraj Shridhar and a tune that catches you in literally seconds, not minutes, Pritam adds Kavita Seth’s voice to make a perfect cocktail of music in the very first song of the album. One that took the world by the storm, and is not going to go down too soon. It DOES make you tap your feet.

The good part about the song is that the more catchy part of the song – tumhi din chadhe..sakha tumhi – is not all that the song has. The soul of the song comes up with Kavita’s singing and Irshad’s words which seem to express a Meerabai like devotion even in the beach-madness-rock ambiance.

Daaru Desi – regular stuff from Pritam.

A song that would at one time happen to feature KK and can’t-guess-who comes up beautifully in Benny and Shalmali’s voices. After Ishaqzaade, Shalmali’s open voice singing works here too, though the song is not Pareshaan for sure. Good, worth a listen.

Mohan Kanan. Shilpa Rao. A little more Rock. And a good song. Na chhode yaariyan.

Actually people criticize me for being reminded of songs all the time while reviewing. And at times I feel that’s true. But I can’t help thinking of Kar Chalna shuru tu when I listen to Yaariyan. Not like the songs are same. It’s just the Amit Trivedi style processing of the song and the minor similarities in songs make me think of the former. However, Pritam takes a beautiful step in making Mohan sing this one. The depth in his voice is an expression in itself. Lovely that.

Second Hand Jawani. The compulsory single screen collection song.

The song with Meri behen-d jawani, second hand jawani type words. Catchy, Govinda-age music. Singers can be from India or Canada, you know what it is. Important for collection in single screen cinemas.

Tera naam japdi phiraan. Light rock, Heavy voices.

Javed Bashir here has been given a mammoth task. Of making an average song an awesome one. The track is good, and the experiment of using Javed’s voice and Sufi style singing with Nikhil’s full fledged English lyrics and some Barbie-doll style singing by Shefali turns out to be nice. However, this one could be added a unplugged kind version, with just Javed leading the song instead of the remix.

Luttna. Lovely singing. Killer lyrics.

Yep. Taking nothing out of the music, I’d say it’s the superb lyrics that make the song. Anupam Amod’s slow, shayari-ish singing is beautiful here, and the background rock track is just fine. But the overall mix gets heady, if you’re the one for it.

Welcome to India, Arif Lohar.

Heard the name and can’t place it? I bet it’s that one song of Coke Studio that you either didn’t hear much, or heard and just got stuck to. Jugni ji is here in India, in a new cover, but the packaging and the material, though changed, has not been altered too much, mostly keeping the soul of the song there. The lovers of Coke Studio might not like it too much, but Pritam has done some good work here, much of it by not working too much on the song. This one is something to listen to, a must-loop if you haven’t heard the original one. And yes, before I forget, good choice putting Harshdeep here, she is that one part of the song that’s probably better than that in original.

So that was the review that should have came ages ago. But better late than never. Hope you’re loving this Cocktail already.

Players: Music Review (Pritam)

Ten tracks, five songs and rest reprises and remixes. Typical Pritam.

Jis jagah khatam sabki baat hoti hai is again a patterned one with Neeraj Shridhar, SIddharth, Mauli, and an almost chorus, and sounds quite like an Abbas Mustan movie song, but works fine.

The second song, Jhoom jhoom jhoomta tu ja, is not just a different one for Pritam, but a lovely one and a well chosen voice. The song has a little Turkish-Arabic touch, a hint of belly dance numbers, but still the tune doesn’t get all alien. Reminds me of Hawa hawa a bit too. But what I loved here was Ritu Pathak’s voice whose voice has been used by Pritam before but not so well.

The third one, however, did not sound that interesting to me. Yashita Yashpal’s Ho gayi tun has a tune that might sound addictive, but not so soon. Not on my list for now. Maybe promos or more listening change the opinion.

The next, Isko Buddhi Do Bhagwan, is a hit material, though quality might not be the aim here. The lyrics are too simple and so is the tune, but it’s Url (Earl)’s Abhishek Bachchan like voice that might do the trick here. As for Shruti Pathak, it’s probably her voice’s worst use till date.

Enter Pritam and Mohit, with Shreya, to make you go mad, again, like always. Dil ye bekaraar kyun hai, tujhpe aetbaar kyun hai, kyun hai ye khumaar kyun hai.. whatever. The whole point is that Pritam can do it with Mohit a hundred times and still get amazing results. God knows how. Just do listen. They do it for the umpteenth time.

Siddharth Basrur’s version of Jhoom jhoom goes with a very different style when compared to that of Ritu. While the first one was all about ‘nice’ singing, this is almost about mad singing. I mean Siddharth seems to be singing a song that was made for Atif here, and interestingly, still manages to sound good. Catchy and yet looks like it’ll have some good shelf life.

Dil ye Beqarar kyun hai appears again, this time with Nikhil D’Souza singing the reprise. Pritam once again keeps him with more techno version, but this time his voice has been processed a bit too. Still the song does sound nice. And though the first choice still is Mohit’s version, I don’t think I’ll be listening to this version very less. Priyani Vani sounds okay.

And then the final, film version of Jhoom Jhoom comes from Arijit Singh, who sings probably his first solo here, and does it really well for a beginner.

As for the remixes, there are two, for the first song of Neeraj and Mohit’s Dil ye bekaraar kyun hai. None too special, though I was wondering if it was Nikhil’s voice in the background of the latter.

Overall, Players is once again a lovely album from Pritam where he mostly creates what he is an expert at, with one or two new things here and there. Dil ye beqaraar and Jhoom Jhoom are definitely the two to look forward to.

Tell Me O Kkhuda: Music Review (Pritam)

The album starts with Oh-I-think-I-have-seen-this-on-tv Someone somebody. Well, I mean to say that most of you would have seen it on the TV but probably just don’t remember. Well, again, it seems what you saw on the TV was the remix version and the original version seems to be nice, decent. Sunidhi seems doing well here and the lyrics fit with the slow tune. Actually, I like, though at six minutes the song gets a little too long.

The next entry is that of Anupam Amod and Aditi Banerjee’s Love you Dad, and almost tells you the real life story of Esha Deol and Dharmendra, even though the story in the movie would be something else. Anupam Amod sounds like some singer of ’90s but sounds nice, a nice one after Saudebaazi. As for Aditi, it’s not her song really as she doesn’t get too much to sing here. Emo stuff, not bad if you like that.

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Mausam (2011): Music Review (Pritam)

13 tracks. 6 original songs. 11 singers. With some singing more than one song and some songs getting different singers for different versions. In short, Pritam does his best to create a full mix and match combination, and the results seem pretty good. There we go with a review.

Rabba main to mar gaya oye. Shahid Mallya. A nice song with lovely, romantic lyrics and Shahid Mallya’s slightly husky voice goes quite well with the light music of the song with a little Punjabi touch. Good start.

The second song may remind you of thoda thoda pyaar with its video and initial arrangements, but once Mika gets into singing saj dhaj ke tashan mein rehna, you know it’s a typical Mika thing where you can lose yourself and dance like mad. I may be biased here, but I kinda loved Pankaj Kapur’s single line entry here.

Next comes Hans Raj Hans with ik tu hi tu hi, a sad song which not only boasts of some nice arrangements and lovely use of chorus (should I say a bit Rahman’ish), but also some beautiful lyrics from Irshad Kamil. Do listen to this one. I am wondering at how composers are turning to Hans raj Hans for serious stuff like this one or rather how it didn’t happen much earlier.

The next treat comes from Rashid Khan who sounds in his full color as he sings Poore se zara sa kam hain. I must applaud Pritam here for giving Rashid full command over the song as the latter sings without any background for the first minute and later also goes in a very Indian arrangement. Another good thing, you find no adulterated (politically correct: remixed) versions of the song. Do listen.

Karsan Sargathiya’s aag lage us aag ko has more than a touch of folk, especially with Dholi Taaro man Karsan’s singing. Okay this one.

Hard Kaur’s entry in the serious album sounds a bit sudden/strange/abrupt, but soon Tochi Raina takes over with an almost new avatar as he sings Mallo Malli naal yaar de, a lovely Punjabi dance number for the youth to dance on. Not a very mature song going by the standard of the album yet, but still quite interesting and listenable, or should I say danceable.

After the original songs start remixes, reprises and more. First one, Rabba, with Rahat here. Needless to say, the version is nice, but I was equally ok with Shahid Mallya’s version. In fact with nothing special for/by Rahat here, I’d prefer Shahid’s version.

After Singh is Kinng, Tiger style come in to remix for Mika’s Saj Dhaj ke, in a desi mix and a club mix, both of which don’t sound too great, but are good for dancing at parties.

Next comes a reprise version of ik tu hi tu, which is sung by Shahid Mallya this time, and the guy kind of impresses me, as he sounds as good as Hans Raj Hans did for the song. But what is a surprise here is the next version of the song, sung by Wadali Brothers. The Mehfil Mix sounds nice and quite different from the original. But then again, do not compare with Rangrez.

At the end there are two versions of Mallo Malli, which are sung by Lehember Hussainpuri with Hard Kaur and Tochi Raina alone respectively, which look a bit too much as so many repetitions were probably not required.

Overall Mausam is a really nice album from Pritam with at least four songs out of six in the ‘very good’ category. While almost the entire album seems to have a Punjabi touch, there is still variety in the songs, and not only in terms of singers used. So my verdict is: buy it, listen to it.

Lyrics from MAUSAM

Bodyguard: Music Review (Himesh Reshammiya, Pritam)

In Bodyguard title song, Salman tries to get a Dhinka chika done by Himesh and of course, success doesn’t come, not properly at least. But then the song can do well as a ‘title’ song, making a good background for the movie, and trailers.

Mika’s Desi beat is a nice try at a dance number, and the song should do fine, but again, Himesh doesn’t do any magic here, leaving me a bit disappointed.

What beats everything though, is Pritam’s I love you, sung by Ash King with Clinton Cerejo. Ash is not the best when it comes to diction and things like ‘main’ becoming almost ‘mein’ are common, but still his version sounds better than Shaan’s Unplugged. Typical of Pritam but lovely.

The next, Rahat and Shreya’s Teri meri meri teri prem kahani is a song with a complex, but lovely melody. The Himesh Reshammiya composition might take some time to grow on one, but sounds lovely nonetheless. In that context it reminds me of Anjaana Anjaani title track (by Vishal n Shilpa) though there is hardly any similarilty between the two. The unplugged version of the song is a little more interesting, though it doesn’t really seem necessary with the actual song quite easy on ears already. Nice sung by Rahat.

Overall, Bodyguard is not as good as I had expected, especially from Himesh. Though Pritam tries to make things better. And does that.

Buy Bodyguard Audio CD Here.

Always Kabhi Kabhi: Music Review (Pritam, Aashish, Shree D)

The album starts with Aashish Rego and Shree D’s only composition for the album, which happens to be the title track of the album. The song, sung by Bhavin Dhanak, Sanah Moidutty and Apeksha Dandekar, is a usual, funky-colleg-y number that is full of nice beats, but the less than four minutes’ track takes a lovely turn when a Sufiana voice enters the song almost a minute before the end of the song. Still don’t know which of the singers it is, but completely loved the entry, especially the way it happens there. Shame that the voice doesn’t sing much.

From the second song onwards, it gets Pritam. Antenna sounds a lot like some song from Ready, probably the sound matches character dheela hai. Also, the lyrics are written by Amitabh Bhattacharya, but didn’t like the concept of the song itself. Still, the sound of the song IS catchy and can catch up well with some good promotion.
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Kuchh Luv Jaisa: Music Review (Pritam)

Mohit Chauhan is an addiction. You must have known it by now and the opening song Naina, or the title song you may say, is yet again proving it. No, you don’t fall in love with the simple song the first time you hear it, but two or three rounds and you know it’s getting on to you. A little confusion may be there with lyrics as Mohit does a Kailash Kher, singing some female lyrics, but the song is nonetheless lovely.

The second song Thoda sa Pyaar is a beautiful one, and Sunidhi croons this heartfelt, slow number with perfection, while Anupam Amod (Saudebazi guy) has a touched-up sound in the background, nothing too great in that, but a nice experiment. The song that reminds me of New York’s Mere sang chal zara, has two more versions later in the album, out of which Naresh Iyer’s version is definitely something to listen to.

After two lovely songs, suddenly an amateur sounding baadlon pe paon enters. Not a bad one, but the song, sung by an unknown Mannan Shah sounds a bit too fast and not too maturely treated. Though if heard repeatedly, my guess is that the song will work fine.

Nikhil D’Souza enters the next song Khwab tha, in a slow, touchy mode, but since the title of the song reads rock with it, you know where it would be going and does it go, sounding quite lovely. As the song progresses, it gets better, and by the end, you may almost be ready to listen to the song again, where Mannan’s version of Thoda sa Pyaar comes up. Not bad, but Mannan sounds amateur in this much-better-than-his-previous song. I’m not yet liking this guy from Pritam. Any Shah connections?

The next track is Raghav’s confession, the other version of Khwab, interestingly sung by Nikhil again. I am not surprised by the amount of trust Pritam is putting in the guy. Probably because I’m already a fan of the singer. A bit slower than the rock version, the song sounds kinda stable and will probably be liked more in a relaxed mood. Or probably I’ll like the rock version more always. But well sung again, definitely.

The last song is Naresh Iyer’s version of Thoda sa Pyaar where I wonder who this Shefali Ghosh is and what is Pritam trying to get her to do, but then Naresh enters and I’m bowled by the smoothness of his voice once again. One beautiful track, again.

So overall, Kucch Luv Jaisaa has just four songs among its seven tracks, but most of it is likable. Except for baadlon pe paon and to some extent Thoda sa Pyaar (Raghav’s version) I would like to keep the songs in loop for some time. That, if only I’m able to get out of that album called Rewind by Band Called Nine.

Ready: Music Review (Pritam)

Ishaq ke naam par karte sabhi ab raasleela hain, Main karoon to saala character dheela hai. While Neeraj Shridhar and Pritam are at it again, Amitabh Bhattacharya makes his presence very clearly felt in the song with his witty pen this time. Listen to this one: farak padta hai kya baahon mein munni hai ya sheela hai. Go for it.

Wait, was it Pritam rendering those English lines at the start of this wonderful song? It should have been Neeraj to start this romantic treat from KK, the song that’s called Humko Pyar hua. Not much to say, this one is good again. Go for this as well.

Enter DSP. THE Devi Sri Prasad with his only composition for Ready 2011, sung by Mika. I knew only one Ringa ringa in Telugu and as soon as I started the song, it was unmistakably the one. And I must say that the dhinka chika remake is not bad. Gives me the feel of the original song to quite an extent, probably as close as it could be. What is to be seen is how well the song fits Bollywood, cause I still imagine a typical Telugu movie background with the song. I’m in for this one.

Enter long vacha at the start. Enter must-dance-on-this DJ. Enter RFAK. In a whole just-dance mood, with his awesomely superb singing. Enter Tulsi with her can-somehow-sing-well-with-RFAK mood. Awesome song.

OK. Maybe I said too much about that last song, meri ada bhi aaj kya kar gayi, but frankly, I loved the song and Rahat Fateh Ali Khan singing in that mixture of long-vacha and some more pieces of popular Punjabi songs with that good melody at that fast pace, making a good thing to dance on, or simply listen to, as you like it.

Since I didn’t find anything special in the remixes, that is kinda all I have to say about the album, which actually isn’t less in any way. The album has just four songs and while all four are good, they are also different in their style and representation. While Pritam sticks to formula in Character Dheela, there is some experimentation added in Meri ada bhi, KK is good as ever and DSP’s composition is almost all new to Bollywood listeners. In short, it seems the music is ready to rock you, are you Ready?

Dum Maaro Dum: Music Review

Abhishek and Earl’s Thayn Thayn somehow sounds so much like a piece from Bluffmaster even with a different composer here. I guess this will sound good and look great once it comes out. Watch out for it.

Te Amo, the song sung by Ash King, is definitely a lovely one and Pritam does his own good thing with Ash’s voice, as long as you don’t compare this one to Dil gira daffatan. While Ash is lovely in the soft romantic song and natural with the English parts of the song, Sunidhi is not bad either. One song you would love.

Like in all Pritam albums, there is another version of Te Amo, a reprise by Pritam. I guess I need not tell you how a soft version of a soft romantic song would sound when Mohit sings it. The slight acoustic setting Pritam has given to the song is nice.

Mit Jaaye Gham. Dum Maaro Dum. Shirt. Potty. Nanga. Well, It’s like that only. All I can say is that after this song is on air, the censor board won’t have to do much to decide the audience. Families are NOT going to watch this one. Oh, as for the music, it’s okay. As expected, it’s made in kinda addictive mood. But lyrics, oh, well..

If there is something in the album that I was able to hear in a loop from the first time itself, here it is. Jiyein Kyun is not only good on music and singing, the lyrics are so lovely, I just fell for the song very soon.

As for the music, Pritam is almost in Metro mood here and Papon sounds so much like James in his singing. And Mr Sahni Jaideep, I love you. DO Listen to this one.

And then Zubeen Garg’s Jaana hai is a signature Pritam song in Zubeen’s very typical voice. Nothing too great, but there is definitely a special kind of depth in Zubeen’s voice that Always attracts you, which especially suits songs with a, what would I say, kashish, with a longing to go ahead and achieve something. And here is one such song. Liked it.

Overall, Dum Maaro Dum may be an album to hide from your parents (yes, at any age) after listening to that title song, but there are a few good songs in the album and while you love everything from Jiyein Kyun to Te Amo, Jaana hai and Thayn Thayn aren’t disappointing. In short, cool. In fact a bit too much in a some places, you know.

Thank You: Music Review

Anees Bazmee definitely does things in an upside down way. That’s how there is Thank You after Welcome. This one again comes from the Pritam’s Factory of Dance-n-forget Music. Here comes a review.

The album starts with Mika’s Pyaar do Pyaar lo, that you might have caught on TV. The oldie-newie song sounds more like a remix and looks very much like a try to redo apni to jaise taise from Housefull. I guess Pritam has been successful, but not so much as SEL were with theirs.

The next song, Razia, is sung by Saleem and Ritu Pathak, but Saleem can be confused for a girl with his high pitch here. Allah bachaye meri jaan ki razia gundon mein phans gayi sounds like a typical item song and Ritu sounds pretty good with her singing. Nothing new, just another good product from the Factory.
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Dil To Baccha Hai Ji: Music Review (Pritam)

Abhi Kuch Dino se is a typical Mohit Chauhan made-to-be-hit. Music is good and lyrics are fine too. Overall something new for a few months. Go for it.

Beshubaha is again a beautiful song where Antara Mitra proves herself once again and Kunal is good to listen. Pritam seems to be going on the track of Once Upon a Time in Mumbai as I could feel a touch of I’m in love here. Good one again.
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Action Replayy: Music Review

Pritam’s Action Replayy starts with a Zor ka Jhatka given by Daler ‘paaji’ along with Richa Sharma. The now-so-sober Daler goes all mad in the song and you can hear him singing words like shaadi ke mandap se khud ko tu bhaga. Anyway, the song has a punch and Daler does make it even more wonderful. Richa’s nasal avatar makes the song more interesting than anything and what you get is an addictive song that will keep running everywhere for some time.

The next song O Bekhabar seems to be on the lines of Tum jo aaye of OUATIM and even though in this one Shreya sings alone (as compared to tum jo aaye’s Tulsi-Rahat) she sounds good enough to equal the hit. Likeable song.

The third song, Nakhre, sung by Francois Castollino, is a step ahead of zor ka jhatka when it comes to lyrics. The song has some matter-of-fact lyrics (according to boys that is) which can make you laugh even before you reach the theater to watch the movie. Definitely interesting, again.
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Aakrosh: I say Yes.

When the world was getting blown away with Rahman’s Jhootha hi Sahi, Pritam’s Aakrosh came out too, and it was good to see I was liking the songs even with Call me Dil running in my mind already. Without saying a lot, I start the review.

The album starts with Tere isak se meetha kuch bhi nahi. The Item number sung by Kalpana Patowary with Ajay Jhingaran is quite good and the girl’s voice shines in the very start, though later on the voice sounds a bit pressed under the instruments. Still, one more hit in the list UP-Bihar songs is ready. 🙂

The second song, Saude Bazi by Anupam Amod is a surprise from the first note sung by the chorus. A beautifully arranged composition by Pritam, I felt the song should go a long way, right when I heard it for the first time. Soft, Romantic, with a different voice, and lovely lyrics. What else would one want. Superb.
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