Bangalore Literature Festival 2013 – Day 1

This was the first time I went for this festival. I got to know only a few months ago that last year Gulzar Saab came to Bangalore, gave a public appearance, and I missed it. So this time I had decided to finally see him. Yep, that was the first and foremost reason for going to the literature festival.

Anyway, the reason told, here is some idea of what I saw on day one.

The day had to begin at ten in the morning, but I was a little early. Deliberately, though I had no plans as to what I’d do there. Things were slightly late too, and the opening ceremony began something around 1020-1030.

There, after the Dollukunita dance, Chandrashekhara Kambara, a Kannada poet-playwright presented a small good-wish speech, while Nabaneeta Dev Sen objected to the use of word ‘bhasha’ as just regional languages in India. Ramchandra Guha gave a little Tamil-in-Bangalore lesson and Ashok Vajpeyi tried to keep the mood light with his short-light talks. Finally when Christoph Bertrams was selling us some Seagull books after Vikram’s someone-even-postponed-his-wedding-for-this-event story, we decided to take a round of book stall, with my G-Mitra Mohit Kataria there too.

After finding and not finding some books, we sat for a few minutes to hear the panel discussion on ‘Vision for India’ but heard only some views of Mohandas Pai, before we were out for something again. And then around 1245 it was Sri Sri Ravi Shankar whose full session was watched. The session was okay, but some of the questions from the public were so ordinary that they made Sri Sri look like a genius there.

Farhan at BLrLitFestAround two, it was Bollywood time. Rakeysh Mehra, Prasoon Joshi and Farhan Akhtar were there for a session and Bhawana Somaaya had a good time talking to them, as did the audiences, where Rakeysh said Bhaag Milkha Bhaag was ‘not a true blue biopic’ but an inspired story. Prasoon talked about things that would have been as shown in the movie, had they been at all, taking the example of the scene where Divya Dutta wears Milkha’s India jacket, and Farhan even had to sing four not-so-sureelee lines with an to-the-core besuree audience. It was Rock On title song, if you must know.

Aarakshan Music Review (Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy, Prasoon Joshi)

After a long time, Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy look in their full color. No, I won’t say ZNMD was bad, but somehow it was patterned, without much ‘new’ really. But they are back again with Aarakshan, with their old mate Prasoon Joshi, this time not just writing but also composing a number, which surprisingly, almost beats SEL’s compositions.

The album starts with ‘Mauka‘ which is, in a way, the theme song of the movie. The song, that basically talks about giving a chaanas (chance) is a song with enthusiasm and a wish to do something. Sung by five singers led by Raman Mahadevan and Mahalaxmi, the song has an item’ish, addictive touch to the music and zeal in the lyrics. Will get promotion, has to work.

Next comes Achcha lagta hai, sung by Mohit Chauhan and Shreya Ghoshal. The song that reminds me of rut aa gayi re in the first few moments, is a peppy number with some nice and fresh arrangements and while Mohit Chauhan is as great as ever with his lovely voice, Shreya is completely into the conversation happening in the song. Liked it. Very much.

Still, Kaun si dor/ Saans Albeli, the composition of Prasoon Joshi, is the surprise of the album. While I had no idea what to expect from him in his first ever composition (at least to my knowledge, in and out of movies), he completely took me by wonder with the song that, sung by Pt Channulal Mishra (with Shreya in case of the duet version Kaun si dor), goes almost completely classical, and the best part is that once I started listening to the song, I did not feel like stopping it for even once in the quarter to six minutes’ run of the song. Completely loved Prasoon’s debut as a composer.

The last song of the album is Roshanee, sung by Shankar Mahadevan, which starts in a slightly ‘Uff teri adaa’ style, but shifts totally to a passionate, ‘joshila’ number very soon. Again some new arrangements from Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy with some good words by Prasoon.

In short, the album is a small treat of four songs from Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy and Prasoon Joshi. Prakash Jha, who got four different composers to create four songs in Raajneeti has once again got it right, in fact better this time.

Break ke Baad: Predictable..

I have some strange opinion about Break ke Baad. I was quite waiting for the album and now that it’s arrived and I see things similar to what I had expected, I am disappointed.

The album sounds quite like a typical Vishal-Shekhar thing, something I never wanted to exist, because I never wanted them to be typecast. Anyway, here is a review of the album. Btw, there is one thing in album I totally loved, Prasoon Joshi’s lyrics.

The first song, Adhoore tum Adhoore hum sung by Vishal Dadlani and Alyssa Mendonça is a rock-ish thing that you can hear and tell the composer now. The song is quite likeable and gets stuck in the mind, and fairly speaking, everything with the song is right other than its predictability. Alyssa’s voice sounds good here too. Go for it.
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Best lyrics of 2009

No. This is not a poll/vote/awards or any fight like that. Here I am simply sharing some good words of the year 2009 that I found appealing due to various reasons. It can be a line, a mukhda, an antara, a complete song, or a complete album. So here comes my list. Don’t worry about numbers. They’re just for time pass.

1. Aarambh hai prachand: This list could hardly have a better start. I still remember that from the Gulaal promo during Dev.D, I had taken only these words home. I love the entire song, but the first line, Aarambh hai prachand gives the song the start it deserves. And then, there was Duniya, composed, sung, written by Piyush Mishra. Ye Duniya agar mil bhi jaye to kya hai was probably the best tribute Sahir could have. Through the genius of Piyush Mishra.

2. Sapno se bhare Naina: Believe it or not, I consider them one of the best lines composed by Javed Akhtar ever. When you start with Chhoo le ise sagar jise har koi maane, you think it’s good. The next line Paani hai wo ya ret hai ye kaun jaane, even better, wow. Superb. And then, the next two lines beat them, Jaise ki din se rain alag hain, sukh hai alag aur chain alag hai and I thought that was the climax, until I heard par jo ye dekhe wo nain alag hain, chain to hai apna sukh hain paraye. The giant wave has passed from over my head. No matter what Shankar Mahadevan sings now. I am mesmerized. Drenched in those words.
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Jashn Hai Jeet Ka (London Dreams/Abhijeet Ghoshal)

Jashn hai jeet ka is a song I’ve fallen in love with. First thing, I love the lyrics of the song. It reminds me of Shakespearean classics, especially Julius Caesar as the singer claims himself to be the King of the world saying aasma mera ab aasma mera. He even says that he doesn’t believe his old friends (Et tu, brute) while he renders majhi pe mujhko nahi ab thoda sa bhi aitbaar, and celebrates his victory like anything. Also, the song has some fierce music and Abhijeet Ghoshal has sung the song in its spirit. Here are the lyrics penned by Prasoon Joshi.

Lyrics:

Sun le khuda gaur se zara
aasma mera ab aasma mera

(neend tod ke khwaab ud gaye
aasma mera ab aasma mera
badal bheench ke honth tar kiya
aasma mera ab aasma mera
main to akele chal diya haathon mein le ke patwar
majhi pe mujhko nahi, ab thoda sa bhi aitbaar
jashn hai jeet ka jeet ka jeet ka
jashn hai jeet ka jeet ka jeet ka)-2

chhale kai talwon mein chubhe kahin bhale kai
jalti hui kahin thi zameen
taale kai dard ya ki sambhale kai
hauslon mein rahi thi kami
hum abhi ad gaye
aandhiyon se lad gaye
maine dhakel ke unhe chheen ke le li roshni
mere hisse ke ve savere, mere hisse ki zindagi
jashn hai jeet ka jeet ka jeet ka
jashn hai jeet ka jeet ka jeet ka..