Shirin Farhad ki Toh Nikal Padi: Music Review (Jeet Ganguli)

Shirin Farhad ki To Nikal Padi Music ReviewJeet Ganguli has been in Bollywood on and off. But since Jeet-Pritam’s separation, he’s not been in the top rated movies. After a long time, he gets to compose for Shirin Farhad ki To Nikal Padi, which, depsite its irregular star cast, should be a big one. And Jeet plays his part right here. Here is a review.

Ishq mein tere bina dil hi na lage. The opening song of the album is a regular romantic number, with a lovely melody, and KK and Shreya singing. The song sounds a lot like those of 1990s-2000s, and sounds good, something that we are not getting to see a lot these days. Good singers, good composition and a nice romantic track. And still a little rare today, that’s what the song is.

The second song, Khatti Meethi, again maintains the melody quotient, while adding some nicer vocals from Shreya as she goes on to sing again. The other feature of the song is Amitabh Bhattacharya’s lyrics with lot of English words, but still keeping them from making the song anything other than natural. You get to hear ‘mausamon mein feel hai’ instead of ‘mausamon mein ehsaas hai’, something a person is more likely to say today. This may be start of something new.

The sad part is that Urdu is leaving us, and English is coming in, but then that’s exactly what is happening in our daily lives and the good part is that the song does it without going overboard. I’d say, good work by Amitabh here.

The next song of the album, Kaafir Andhere, is a treat for music lovers. The song is a love ballad, sad, a little rocky, and sung perfectly by KK. The lyrics of the song are good, as one can expect from Amitabh. The only negative, the song seems to have a hangover of ‘Jaane kyun tanha ho gaye’ of Bhram. Other than that, it’s just lovely.

And yeah, this one kind of makes up for the loss of Urdu out there.

Shirin Farhad ki Toh Nikal Padi. I love this title song. For two reasons. One, this gives something different to the album, something that is prevalent in the market today, and Jeet does it nothing less than Pritam or say, Sohail. And two, I love the simple, very slightly philosophical, but feel-good lyrics. OK, maybe I said a bit too much for the lyrics, but the song is nice. And makes me feel I should watch the movie. Me.

Guitars. Kuku duku. Again a little hangover’ish from here n there, but the sounds are nice, and until Mohit Chauhan enters with the strange, monologue’ish, ’90s type lyrics, you expect a nice romantic number. The good part is even with the comic-romantic lyrics, you like the song, just that it’s not a blockbuster. But nice. Especially for the movie.

Ramba mein Samba by Usha Uthhup has got some nice music, or I should say interesting music, as there were many other songs that fit the words ‘nice’ better. But the fusion of Electronic, Dhol and Spanish background vocals is something that gives a good feel. I like.

Overall, SFKTNP is an album with a lot of melody, something we don’t get a lot nowadays, some good lyrics, with some regular, nice tracks, and a little experimentation and some light comedy thrown in. I don’t think I could have asked for lot more flavors here. Welcome back, Jeet.

Cocktail Music Review (Pritam)

Heavy voices and Light rock, if mixed well, can be the key ingredients of a Bollywood hit today. And this time in Cocktail, Pritam seems to have kept this well in mind. No, not taking any credit away from him for this wonderful album, just trying to understand how it was made.

Tumhi ho Bandhu – what Pritam is.

With Neeraj Shridhar and a tune that catches you in literally seconds, not minutes, Pritam adds Kavita Seth’s voice to make a perfect cocktail of music in the very first song of the album. One that took the world by the storm, and is not going to go down too soon. It DOES make you tap your feet.

The good part about the song is that the more catchy part of the song – tumhi din chadhe..sakha tumhi – is not all that the song has. The soul of the song comes up with Kavita’s singing and Irshad’s words which seem to express a Meerabai like devotion even in the beach-madness-rock ambiance.

Daaru Desi – regular stuff from Pritam.

A song that would at one time happen to feature KK and can’t-guess-who comes up beautifully in Benny and Shalmali’s voices. After Ishaqzaade, Shalmali’s open voice singing works here too, though the song is not Pareshaan for sure. Good, worth a listen.

Mohan Kanan. Shilpa Rao. A little more Rock. And a good song. Na chhode yaariyan.

Actually people criticize me for being reminded of songs all the time while reviewing. And at times I feel that’s true. But I can’t help thinking of Kar Chalna shuru tu when I listen to Yaariyan. Not like the songs are same. It’s just the Amit Trivedi style processing of the song and the minor similarities in songs make me think of the former. However, Pritam takes a beautiful step in making Mohan sing this one. The depth in his voice is an expression in itself. Lovely that.

Second Hand Jawani. The compulsory single screen collection song.

The song with Meri behen-d jawani, second hand jawani type words. Catchy, Govinda-age music. Singers can be from India or Canada, you know what it is. Important for collection in single screen cinemas.

Tera naam japdi phiraan. Light rock, Heavy voices.

Javed Bashir here has been given a mammoth task. Of making an average song an awesome one. The track is good, and the experiment of using Javed’s voice and Sufi style singing with Nikhil’s full fledged English lyrics and some Barbie-doll style singing by Shefali turns out to be nice. However, this one could be added a unplugged kind version, with just Javed leading the song instead of the remix.

Luttna. Lovely singing. Killer lyrics.

Yep. Taking nothing out of the music, I’d say it’s the superb lyrics that make the song. Anupam Amod’s slow, shayari-ish singing is beautiful here, and the background rock track is just fine. But the overall mix gets heady, if you’re the one for it.

Welcome to India, Arif Lohar.

Heard the name and can’t place it? I bet it’s that one song of Coke Studio that you either didn’t hear much, or heard and just got stuck to. Jugni ji is here in India, in a new cover, but the packaging and the material, though changed, has not been altered too much, mostly keeping the soul of the song there. The lovers of Coke Studio might not like it too much, but Pritam has done some good work here, much of it by not working too much on the song. This one is something to listen to, a must-loop if you haven’t heard the original one. And yes, before I forget, good choice putting Harshdeep here, she is that one part of the song that’s probably better than that in original.

So that was the review that should have came ages ago. But better late than never. Hope you’re loving this Cocktail already.

Jo Hum Chahein: Music Review (Sachin Gupta)

Sachin Gupta, the man behind Ehsaan itna sa kar de and Prince, is here again, with his new album, Jo Hum Chahein. Here is a review of the album.

The album starts with Aaj bhi Party sung by Suraj Jagan, which impresses with its sound from the very beginning. Yet another party song, Aaj bhi party is based on a nice tune and the sound of the song has been well worked on. Suraj Jagan once again does well.

The second song of the album, Ishq hothon se to hota nahi bayaan is a nice surprise from KK and Shreya Ghoshal, that goes a little in the ‘Ehsaan’ way, without the high notes. I mean, the song is a really soulful number with lovely lyrics and soft music on a nice melody, but the background has some rock’ish effects here and there. Well fused. Do listen.

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Rascals: Music Review (Vishal-Shekhar)

The title song is not really a great one, and just passes the regular Neeraj Shridhar number mark. While the next, Tik tuk tik tuk is an interesting one, not just because of additive music and lyrics but also Daler Mehndi.

The next, Neeraj Shridhar and Sunidhi’s Pardaa Nasheen, again is not too impressive, even though the melody of the song is nice.

The last song of the album, Shake it saiyyan, sung by Sunidhi Chauhan with Haji Springer is more like a remix album of the early 2000s, but sounds fine nonetheless. In fact the arrangements of the song are nice too, and overall it is one of the better songs of the album.

Interestingly, the two remixes there, for title song and shake it saiyyan, are both not bad as well.

Overall, Rascals is okay to listen on radio or in the movie IF you watch the movie, but I don’t think there is much worth buying in the album.

Ready: Music Review (Pritam)

Ishaq ke naam par karte sabhi ab raasleela hain, Main karoon to saala character dheela hai. While Neeraj Shridhar and Pritam are at it again, Amitabh Bhattacharya makes his presence very clearly felt in the song with his witty pen this time. Listen to this one: farak padta hai kya baahon mein munni hai ya sheela hai. Go for it.

Wait, was it Pritam rendering those English lines at the start of this wonderful song? It should have been Neeraj to start this romantic treat from KK, the song that’s called Humko Pyar hua. Not much to say, this one is good again. Go for this as well.

Enter DSP. THE Devi Sri Prasad with his only composition for Ready 2011, sung by Mika. I knew only one Ringa ringa in Telugu and as soon as I started the song, it was unmistakably the one. And I must say that the dhinka chika remake is not bad. Gives me the feel of the original song to quite an extent, probably as close as it could be. What is to be seen is how well the song fits Bollywood, cause I still imagine a typical Telugu movie background with the song. I’m in for this one.

Enter long vacha at the start. Enter must-dance-on-this DJ. Enter RFAK. In a whole just-dance mood, with his awesomely superb singing. Enter Tulsi with her can-somehow-sing-well-with-RFAK mood. Awesome song.

OK. Maybe I said too much about that last song, meri ada bhi aaj kya kar gayi, but frankly, I loved the song and Rahat Fateh Ali Khan singing in that mixture of long-vacha and some more pieces of popular Punjabi songs with that good melody at that fast pace, making a good thing to dance on, or simply listen to, as you like it.

Since I didn’t find anything special in the remixes, that is kinda all I have to say about the album, which actually isn’t less in any way. The album has just four songs and while all four are good, they are also different in their style and representation. While Pritam sticks to formula in Character Dheela, there is some experimentation added in Meri ada bhi, KK is good as ever and DSP’s composition is almost all new to Bollywood listeners. In short, it seems the music is ready to rock you, are you Ready?

Love u Mr Kalakaar Music Review (Sandesh Shandilya)

I don’t really look forward to Tusshar Kapoor’s movies. Or their music. But recently, it seems things are becoming different. Last week it was Shor in the City and this time it’s none other than Sandesh Shandilya’s Love u Mr Kalakaar that seem to have changed things for at least now. Here comes a review.

Sandesh’s album starts with a song called Sarphira sa hai dil, sung by Shreya and, wait-for-it, Neeraj Shridhar. Well, Sandesh seems to be doing things more market-way in this one (and hence comes Neeraj) but not in a negative way. A soft-romantic and good melody but with some not-so-typical-of-him arrangements from the composer. Sounds more like a good work of Pritam, definitely worth a try.

The next song, Tera Intezaar, brings in Vijay Prakash and Gayatri Ganjawalla and while this one may not be loved by some fans of Sandesh Shandilya’s fans (I hope he has some), it’s a good one again. The beats may sound a bit too much but Vijay Prakash gets to sing a lovely one and I think the song can pick up quite fast.

The next song, Bhoore Bhoore Badal has Kunal Ganjawalla and Shreya doing some back-to-Shandilya singing. Nice and kinda experimental one with some good lyrics, but somehow this poetry doesn’t take off as well as I expected at the start. Still do listen to the song if you like Shandilya’s music. You might like it as well.

Kunal-Gayatri Ganjawalla sung title song is the, well, boring title song, for probably the credits. Kunal in his typical style and not too bad, but nothing really musical.

Next comes a Mohit Chauhan-Shivangi Kashyap sung Kahin se Chali aa, which is attracting from the very first word. I need not say that Mohit Chauhan and Sandesh can be a deadly combination, and in this one Mohit seems to be just gliding his voice on the music in a very natural style without any special treatment. Kinda soothing, though I probably won’t say the same for Shivangi.

Again, Reeky Dev’s revisited Tera Intezaar isn’t bad. The Mumbai-based-Bangladeshi singer (says FB) does sound good here. Will probably look for the name going further.

The last, Reaching for the Rainbow sung by Jenice Sobti and Vinnie Hutton, is a soothing all-English melody, which somehow enticed such a hardly-ever English listener. Not bad, I guess.

Overall, Love u Mr Kalakaar seems to be a good step as it definitely goes beyond my expectations, which was actually a big naught (I didn’t know it was a Barjatya’s thing) and even though the album is not something huge, the songs are okay and almost all are at least worth a try. So do listen to the album and decide how many songs would stick to your playlist. I expect a few, at least kahin se chali aa, and probably a version of Tera intezaar.

Thank You: Music Review

Anees Bazmee definitely does things in an upside down way. That’s how there is Thank You after Welcome. This one again comes from the Pritam’s Factory of Dance-n-forget Music. Here comes a review.

The album starts with Mika’s Pyaar do Pyaar lo, that you might have caught on TV. The oldie-newie song sounds more like a remix and looks very much like a try to redo apni to jaise taise from Housefull. I guess Pritam has been successful, but not so much as SEL were with theirs.

The next song, Razia, is sung by Saleem and Ritu Pathak, but Saleem can be confused for a girl with his high pitch here. Allah bachaye meri jaan ki razia gundon mein phans gayi sounds like a typical item song and Ritu sounds pretty good with her singing. Nothing new, just another good product from the Factory.
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FALTU: Music Review (Sachin-Jigar)

The album starts with a typical Atif song, Leja tu mujhe. Sachin Jigar create another likable but so-usual number for Atif and he sings it regularly. You can have a feel of Prince here, but I’d say the song is better than an average song of Prince. Still, you miss nothing if you don’t listen to it.

When you listen to the lyrics of Chaar baj gaye, for once you feel that the song is a try to make another Amplifier, but then there are certain differences and Hard Kaur is a bit different from what she does in every second album nowadays. The song is okay in composition but the mixture of composition, lyrics and vocals should be enough to make the song a party thing, that, if it reaches enough people.

In the next, Rab sab se sona, Sachin-Jigar do a full Pritam and make Neeraj Shridhar do a song that is typical him. The song, a relatively slow composition, works simply for its arrangements that completely go with Neeraj’s voice.

The next song, awaaz, is sung by one of the composer duo, Jigar. And while the lyrics of the album seem to stand out from the first two lines, very soon one may find similarities to A R Rahman and Sohail Sen’s patriotic compositions (latter from KHJJS). Still, the song is not too similar to any song and sounds like a good one with some fine lyrics and some likable music as well. Do try this one.

With Mika and a song named Fully Faltu, the album takes a one eighty turn and comes to a completely I-will-make-you-hum-this-at-any-cost song. Yes, aaltu-jalaltu part of the song is a bit catchy, very easy, and highly repeated so that one’s mind is almost pressurised to place it somewhere. Nothing too great, but with the tactics and promos, it should work.

Vijay Prakash and Priya Panchal come next with Gale laga le, another compositions with slight Rahman effects. I suppose this is no coincidence that the composers have come up with one of Rahman’s favorite singers. But beyond Vijay, I liked the voice of Priya who seemed to sing something like Shilpa Rao and somehow Alyssa Mendonça too. Though I liked the song, I don’t think the song offers a lot more than awaaz.

Nayee Subah is sung again by Jigar, but this time it’s something like Ale (Golmaal 3). I wonder how I’m able to find everything in the album similar to something else, but this is what I feel with every song I hear in the album.

Anyway, while the penultimate song, O Teri, sung by Jigar again, is more about seen and unseen Obscenities, Neuman Pinto’s Percentage somehow sounds somewhat like Ten on ten, but on a completely different topic. While the lyrics of the song had a huge scope of being better, the overall song somehow manages to sound okay.

Overall, in terms of music, F.A.L.T.U. does not literally characterizes its name, but is not on the opposite end either. While for a comedy songs are not too bad, in certain place there is a lot to be done. While there is not much new, songs like char baj gaye and awaaz are worth a try.

Mumbai Mast Kallander: Music Review

The album starts with Sloshed, a song composed by Teenu Arora, though it sounds quite like a Pritam composition as it’s sung by Neeraj Shridhar in his typical way, the way he sings all the Pritam songs. Saru Maini doesn’t offer much of a deviation, but the songs sounds quite fine, with Neeraj taking most of the credit for that.

The next, the title song, Mumbai Mast Kalandar, is more of a background thing with some rap and some pop. While some of the lyrics sound almost meaningless, some lines are quite good too, making the song overall an okay experience. If promoted well, the song has a potential to be liked.
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Break ke Baad: Predictable..

I have some strange opinion about Break ke Baad. I was quite waiting for the album and now that it’s arrived and I see things similar to what I had expected, I am disappointed.

The album sounds quite like a typical Vishal-Shekhar thing, something I never wanted to exist, because I never wanted them to be typecast. Anyway, here is a review of the album. Btw, there is one thing in album I totally loved, Prasoon Joshi’s lyrics.

The first song, Adhoore tum Adhoore hum sung by Vishal Dadlani and Alyssa Mendonça is a rock-ish thing that you can hear and tell the composer now. The song is quite likeable and gets stuck in the mind, and fairly speaking, everything with the song is right other than its predictability. Alyssa’s voice sounds good here too. Go for it.
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Action Replayy: Music Review

Pritam’s Action Replayy starts with a Zor ka Jhatka given by Daler ‘paaji’ along with Richa Sharma. The now-so-sober Daler goes all mad in the song and you can hear him singing words like shaadi ke mandap se khud ko tu bhaga. Anyway, the song has a punch and Daler does make it even more wonderful. Richa’s nasal avatar makes the song more interesting than anything and what you get is an addictive song that will keep running everywhere for some time.

The next song O Bekhabar seems to be on the lines of Tum jo aaye of OUATIM and even though in this one Shreya sings alone (as compared to tum jo aaye’s Tulsi-Rahat) she sounds good enough to equal the hit. Likeable song.

The third song, Nakhre, sung by Francois Castollino, is a step ahead of zor ka jhatka when it comes to lyrics. The song has some matter-of-fact lyrics (according to boys that is) which can make you laugh even before you reach the theater to watch the movie. Definitely interesting, again.
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Crook. Pritam Again.

Crook is once again something wonderful by Pritam, this time with Babu Mann’s support.

The first song, Chhalla, is definitely a superb thing. Babu Mann’s song, which is so-heard, so-lovable, so-wonderful thing, I need not say will be an instant hit. Babu’s singing is lovable too. Btw, the song has Suzanne D’Mello singing too. Though she comes a second this time as Babu steals all the magic. Tadada-Tadada-Tada-dada.

Enters Nikhil D’Souza. If you’re reading the album covers carefully, you’d easily be knowing that the guy is progressing like anything and has sung with as varied composers as Amit Trivedi, Vishal-Shekhar and now Pritam, all that in less than two months. Well, the guy sounds pretty good and quite easy on ears, especially here as he sings Mere Bina, a slow, not-too-soft, but quite beautiful song for Pritam. Listen to the song. I can tell you’ll love it more every time.
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Aashayein: Music Review

Salim Sulaiman’s Aashayein was such a long pending album, I was never expecting it to release. But it finally did. It seems in the long time they have added as many remixes as possible, that’s how I can see 13 tracks on the album, made out of 7 songs.

The album surprisingly starts with a Pritam song, Mera Jeena hai kya, sung by Neeraj Shridhar. Interestingly, the song is a bit different from their typical songs as this one seems aligned towards rock. I wonder why Pritam didn’t get KK to sing this one. KK and Nagesh Kukunoor has already been an old hit jodi. Good one but could be better.

Then the next, Dilkash Dildaar duniya comes which is again a Pritam composition and sung by Shaan and Tulsi Kumar. A beat-based song with a nostalgic feel. Shaan is fine but I’m not coming to terms with Tulsi very well. Okay song.

The third song, Rabba comes from Shiraz Uppal. Somehow, I don’t like Shiraz Uppal very much with lower notes. Shiraz is a guy who is best when he sings with his full throat. But here he sings more on lower notes and goes high only for ‘Rabba ye kya hua, Rabba ye dil gaya’ there too not so good I had expected. Some good lyrics and certainly not a bad song, but was expecting more from Shiraz. This is just okay.

Then comes the already heard Zubeen sung ‘Ab mujhko Jeena.’ The song starts somewhat like Summer of 69 but then it moves to a fast, inspiring type song. Can’t say much about the song as I’ve heard it way too much already. It’s even been my ringtone for a long time. So all I can say is the song is definitely good.

Next song of the album, Shukriya Zindagi, that starts on a lovely note and as Shafqat starts singing ‘chhan ke aayi to kya chandni to mili’ in an easy mood, you know you’re going to get an inspirational treat from Salim-Sulaiman and Shafqat. Beautiful lyrics by Mir Ali Husain in continuously second song.

As Shreya Ghoshal starts rendering Pal mein Mila Jahan, in her soft voice, with almost nothing playing in the background, you think it’s a sad version of some song, but then the song proceeds, and after a tough job done by Shreya, instruments appear in the background. A really good song and some superb singing by Shreya but I don’t know how many will have patience to listen to this song. Try to listen to the song anyway.

Finally, Chala Aaya Pyaar brings in Mohit Chauhan. A quite slow, deep song with some romantic lyrics. Somehow after ‘Pal mein’ the song sounds a bit sad as it seems to mix with its predecessor, but as Mohit comes towards the higher notes in the song, you start liking it. Good use of percussion, loved the tabla in the song. Go for it, but it may need some patience before you fall for the song.

Shankar Mahadevan is a choice of many composers when it comes to deep songs, and even more when there are less instruments in the background, as Shankar has got some awesome power in his voice. Therefore, after Raajneeti’s Dhan dhan dharti re, he gets to sing another earthy song with less instruments and more singing. And the song is none other than Shreya sung Pal mein mila Jahan’s male version, but Shankar gives the song much more power than Shreya did. I guess people would like this one more, if they have enough patience to decide.

After this, the album has five remixes but I wouldn’t even hear them as of now, after listening to seven songs already. Oh, btw, there is one sad version of Shukriya Zindagi which is again a wonderful listen for those who appreciate one minute long instrumentless pieces. Cuz I was a fan of Aashayein slow version and always played the song after the slow version.

Overall, the album is not bad, but not very good either. While no song is actually bad, only a few, namely ab mujhko jeena, shukriya zindagi, pal mein mila jahan look upto their level. Mohit Chauhan and Shiraz Uppal are a bit below their own set standards. The biggest problem is that few songs in the album catch you instantly, though I hope many of the songs will sound just perfect in the movie as background.

All I’d say is, I had some more aashayein from aashayein.

Housefull: Music Review (Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy)

Housefull’s music is not great. It’s what it is supposed to be – Total Time Pass and Entertaining. Like it, love it, use it, throw it. Well, almost.
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Na Ghar ke Na Ghaat ke: Music Review

And then, I found this album called Na Ghar Ke Na Ghaat Ke, composed by Lalit Pandit. So here is a music review.

The album starts with the title song, Na Ghar ke Na Ghaat ke munna, sung by Remo Fernandes, who is singing rarely for Bollywood movies for quite some time. The song gets me quite some hope as it starts, but it gets kind of confused in between as the antara goes banal and Remo alone struggles to make the song what it started as, not really succeeding to get the same effect as comes in the first minute of the song. Still the song is a good try by Lalit and makes me feel that if he tries to do new things like this and does that with persistence, the results can be good. Try and listen to the song 2-3 times and then decide if you liked it. It may be a bit loud, but it’s not bad.
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