Besharam – Lalit Pandit [Yeah, that’s Right] n Ishq-Shree

Besharam title song, for which credit is shared by the singers Ishq-Shree too. The song is anyway fine, though the trailer version looked more promising than the original song. Maybe it’s a victim of a little too much of experiments. Still, a fine background for the movie, if at all this movie keeps anything in background [Not talking of the song].

Besharam is a cocky film, and its item number has to be cocky. But the Hum lut gaye ainwayi aake tere Mohalle is Cocky in a literal sense of the word, as it begins with a sound that is a bit like roosters’ calls, musicalized of course. Anyway, Abhinav Kashyap – Lalit Pandit combo seems to work here, as the song sounds the closest yet to Munni. Not as good as Munni, but not as far as most of such songs have been. Worth a listen. Rest will be clear when it’s on TV.

Zanjeer Music Review

The opening song of the album, Chirantan Bhatt’s Hum Hain Mumbai ke Hero is an addictive tune. But the lyrics of the song are so bad that using Amitabh Bachchan and Pran’s voices in the same song sounds bad to the legends. Anyway, Mika’s singing in the song is better than Priyanka’s acting, who, as pointed in a GIF, gets almost …

See the GIF on next page. Or if you think Priyanka might be NSFW, well, skip to Page 3.

Matru ki Bijlee ka Mandola: Music Review (Vishal Bhardwaj)

Vishal. Means Big. So he is, and this time, so is the soundtrack. Literally and figuratively.

The man who brought us rock way back in 2003 and Kalinka in 2011 (as Darling) is this time here with a soundtrack of no less than twelve songs, ranging from Prem Dehati’s renderings to Zulu.

Of course, you get the taste of Gulzar’s pen in the album.

The album begins with the heard-by-everyone title track, that does nothing but makes you dance. There is a madness in the tune, and Gulzar’s lyrics maintain that madness. My guess is that you would have danced to it already. If not, do that, cuz you need not be a dancer to dance to this tune.

The second song of the album, Khamakha Nahi has a foreign element (I dunno which country really) in the beginning chorus, and then it gives you a taste of something like Bekaraan. The romantic track has some simple lyrics by Gulzar, which one can almost identify as his. Loved it.

Oye Boy Charlie, sung by Rekha with Shankar Mahadevan and Mohit is one lovely piece from the album. The song has an English title, desi Gulzar’ed lyrics, desi music and earthy voices. To top it all, the visuals are quite interesting with a comic element. Listen to it. Watch it.

The next track, Hatt Lootnewale, has some lyrics against oppression, and the music isn’t too attractive. But the song has got the best of the singers, as Sukhwinder Singh and Master Saleem, something that may change the listeners’ perception in due time. The popularity of the song will depend a lot on the story/picturization and publicity.

Next comes Shara-ra-ra. A small, one n a half minute track, sung by Prem Dehati. The song is a earthy track with the music, lyrics, and even the brass-band based arrangements being village type. However, this doesn’t sound like Piyush Mishra earthy. So, good, but not exceptionally so.

Badal Uthya ri Sakhi. That’s what the best song of the album is called. The track, sung by Rekha (and later by Prem Dehati in Reprise) is ma’am singing in a full classic-folk mood, with minimal music, and a Sitar ruling the background. The song is actually an old folk song from Haryana and quite popular there. So you know what it is. Do listen. And listen. And let it grow on you.

The joke was, after his debut in Mausam, this guy gets two songs in Vishal Bhardwaj’s Matru ki Bijlee ka Mandola. His name is Pankaj Kapur.

Pankaj sings the next two tracks of the album, which are fun, but would be enjoyed actually when the movie comes out, or at least the video comes out. Pankaj’s singing shows you one side of theatre artist that has hardly been touched by cinema. Try the tracks, or wait for the videos.

The next track is a first in India. It’s called Nomvula, and it’s Zulu music, sung by Umoja [Umoja means Unity in Swahili]. Even the lyrics of the song have been imported, without any Hindi/English being added to them. The music is nice, but I guess an adaptation, maybe something like Kalinka, would be better.

The end of the album comes with a reprise version of Badal Uthiya by Prem Dehati, and a small one for Lootnewale, sung by Sukhwinder. Badal Uthya is ‘almost’ as good as by Rekha, and Sukhwinder’s Lootnewale sounds a little more less noisy than the original version.

Overall, the album has a lot in terms of variety, and some tracks are wonderful; Khamakha, Oye Boy, and Badal Uthya to name the best. But then a few elements were missing too. Both the songs by Rekha are good, but Sukhwinder this time doesn’t seem to have got his fair share despite the number of tracks. When the album was over, I even missed Suresh Wadkar who’s been there for most of Vishal’s albums, including 7KM.

So yes, the album is good. Vishal has done some good work. And it’s worth listening to. But the thirst that came with the big size, isn’t quenched.

Dabangg 2: Music Review [Sajid-Wajid]

Dabangg 2 seems to be beginning where Dabangg ended. Don’t know how much of Abhinav Kashyap’s magic is going to be there with Arbaaz, but at least music seems to tell you very clearly that it’s nothing other than Dabangg 2.

Dagabaaz re, the first song of the album is almost an extension of Tere mast mast do nain, though doesn’t go that high on notes. However, the combination of Salman, Sajid-Wajid and Rahat, and even Shreya, keeps things a lot in Dabangg mood. Lyrics are simple, nice, and in the mood with the music. It’s not mast-mast do nain, but the song is an okay sequel to the superhit track.

Luv Shuv Tey Chicken Khurana: Music Review (Amit Trivedi)

Kikkli Kaller di. Hatt gayi heer di. Ranjha kare cheat ji. Kare heer kya!

If you know what Kikli kaleer di is, then may be you already know what’s up in the song. But if not, let me give you an idea. Kikli kaleer di is a ‘traditional’ dance game for little girls. You can guess what’s happening there when this is what comes out of a traditional thing. And after this, there is standard Amit Trivedi, the singer, singing with very visible stress on certain words.

And if this was not enough, there is Yo Yo Honey Singh saying Main tera Raja Hoon, Tu meri Raani Hai, Baby suraksha hi Saavdhani hai.

Amit Trivedi. All fun.

The second song is called Motorwada. I mean Motorwala. I mean, I can’t give that mix of L and D in English that Haryana uses for their motorists. But then Tochi Raina totally knows how to say it, and how to sing this song. Trivedi goes a little too experimental in interludes, but that’s what makes him what he is. Love it again, though not as impactful as the opening track.

Amit Trivedi makes a simple, melodius Punjabi track next as the title song of Luv Shuv tey Chicken Khurana. So let’s see how he goes.

1. Brings the real, earthy Punjabi voices: Shahid Mallya and Harshdeep Kaur.
2. Makes a simple tune and pours in the superb, lovely, even touching, lyrics of Shellee.
3. Keeps it simple, doesn’t do any Amit Trivedi stuff. Not even average composer stuff of today, just the basics.
4. Brings in some dhol towards the end.

Makes it perfect. Taste and let us know how you liked it.

Looni Hansi. Another earthy song gets the electronic touch that Rahman used to give, to say things like Sasural Genda Phool. Don’t know why I can’t remember an Amit Trivedi song for example, though it sounds very typical of him. Btw, don’t expect genda phool here, it’s not that dance-y from the base itself. Well done Harshdeep, again.

Makkhan Malai by Dilbahar. OK don’t ask me why I say so, but this suddenly sounds like a song of early ’90s. No, not even late ’90s. Maybe would have liked the song, but haven’t been able to remove the ’90s effect from the song and see it outside that. I can still see number of dancers doing PT exercises behind the hero. Sorry for that one, cuz the lyrics sound kinda interesting.

And with Farukhabaadi, we’re back. OK let me take a new angle. For the non-Punjabi, the song would go like this. Sound of girls laughing. Some traditional Punjabi things, some wedding songs maybe. Second line is on, wait, did they say FO? Continue, Teri maa-behen ki ma-behen ki kar doon main jay jay abhi. OK, they WERE saying FO. This is interesting.

Well, that was for someone who knows almost no Punjabi. And if you know the language, it definitely cannot make the song less interesting. In fact from then on, it’s Labh Janjua who is in the lead, but the girls, credited as chorus, the unheard-of-nowadays people, leave a strong impact. In the beginning as well as end.

What do you take from the song after listening to it once? ‘Teri ma-behen-ki-ma-behen-ki’ something something. And you get a music for that. 😉

And then there is an instrumental piece. Somehow Amit keeps it very simple, but still very intriguing, not allowing me to forward it. Great work I’d say. Loved the iktara there. And Rohwit tells me it was Rabab that they’ve used there.

Devender Singh’s version of Luni Hansi is nice, innocent. Not as good as Harshdeep, Devender sounds a little nervous, like he could do better, going by his performances I have seen. Still, worth listening to.

The end of the album comes with Kikkli Kaleer Di, Punjabi version. The song, despite my love for the Hindi version which I have heard numerous times, sounds more natural, lovely. The only thing I miss here is ‘Baby Suraksha hi Savdhani hai!’

Overall, Amit Trivedi is here. Not throughout in his regular colors, but the colors he is wearing are almost all nice. Better than some of his recent works.

Jab Tak Hai Jaan: Music Review (A R Rahman, Gulzar)

Challa ki labhda phire.

When I heard that one, I was struck by a small shock. I was hoping that the movie shouldn’t suddenly become what became of Gulzar n Rahman’s last big thing with a big producer, the Taal guy, Subhash Ghai. n the movie was Yuvvraaj.

The good part is that it’s not that bad. The bad part, it’s not a Rockstar.

Well, so you all have heard the song, and must know by now how SRK taking on Rabbi’s voice looks strange, despite the good song and an otherwise ok video. And yes, the interlude of this song reminded me of Yuvvraaj too, when I heard it first. Bad omens?

Anyway, the second song Saans had Mohit Chauhan and Shreya, and turned out to be good. A little touch of Tum Ho maybe, but the slow, romantic song is nice, and Gulzar’s lyrics are touching, though they don’t so much sound like a free flowing Gulzar. Still, worth listening to.

Ishq Shava. Well, I have some hopes from this song. Ask me why. Because on the first listen, the song sounds like a disaster, and after listening to it for a few times, it’s getting better. So this may be one of those Rahman songs that get stuck, though after their time when they’re considered a failure. Btw, the arrangements are nice, and Gulzar is a little in his ‘touch’ in some lines, for sure. Could be better, but whatever it is, give it some time.

Harshdeep Kaur’s Heer comes next, and that’s a lovely one again. Nice one, with a lot of Punjabi in there. The biggest thing about the song is its naturality, as neither music, nor lyrics sound at all forced. And Harshdeep is equally natural. So that’s one for you, especially if you love Punjabi.

Jiya Jiya re. Doesn’t sound like one from a Yash Chopra’s movie, but this one is nice nonetheless. Gulzar’s lyrics get a little different, slight rock feel here, and the result is not bad. Tells me Neeti Mohan is an underrated singer actually. Good again.

And here is the best of the movie. The title song.

Yes, I am liking the songs of the movie, but this is the one that I expect from Yash-Rahman-Gulzar. Javed Ali sings this one with Shakthisree Gopalan, a known name in Chennai for her rock, but heard little otherwise. And what do I say for the song, it goes right from some rocky feel to downright dholak. This is that This-is-it-Perfect-Blockbuster one. Okay, maybe I am saying too much. Do listen.

Saans reprise, sung by Shreya, is a small one, that would most probably come at the end of the movie. Short and slow, the song somehow touched me more than the original version. Good one.

The instrumental, Ishq Dance, sounded un-great, simple. And then there was Shahrukh’s recitation of a little-too-hyped poem of Aditya Chopra. Nice recitation though.

Overall, the trio of the greatest lyricist and musician of India with one great director comes out okay, but this is not what was expected of them. Hope things get a little better. But somehow I feel disappointed one year after Rockstar.

(All Links point to Lyrics with Translations. You can check All translated Lyrics HERE)

Ek Tha Tiger Music Review (Sohail Sen, Sajid-Wajid)

Should I start with Mashallah? Well, I think there is enough said about the song, and then everyone seems to have heard it, so let’s just say the song is probably going to be the weaker part of the album. Or maybe I can say the weakest, if Salman Bhai’s fans allow me to. Not because he’s wrong anywhere, cuz Sajid-Wajid HAVE given some good songs for him. How can I ever forget the small preview of Tere Mast Mast Do Nain I heard at IIFA. That number within seconds told us what a hit it was going to be. But then, this time they seem to have got it wrong. Not too wrong, but not as right as it has been earlier.

And I wrote again so much about that song. OK, leave that one. Let’s see others.

Sohail Sen’s part of the album begins with a KK song and the duo seem to maintain the rapport shared in their last album, Mere Brother ki Dulhan. KK here again plays the fast track, and sings a full fledged commercial number for Salman, this time with Shreya Ghoshal Palak Muchchal. The song, though not extraordinary as such, has a nice melody and the ‘main laapata‘ part is catchy as well. So be ready to hear many fans singing this one, and in due time, some non-fans too.

The next song of the album, Banjaara, is sung by Sukhwinder Singh. And will definitely be pictured on Salman Khan. That actually tells you a lot about the song. Let me spell it out a little more clearly. The song is full of energy, so much so that without even watching it, one can see Salman Khan dancing to the tune with full energy. This one is a hit.

Teri Meri Meri Teri Prem Kahani hai Naadan Parindey. Saiyyara Main Saiyaara. OK leave the name. Let’s just say there is a sad song sung by Mohit Chauhan for Salman Khan. Can there be a thing deadlier than this as of today? OK I may again be overselling it, but I would at least say that Saiyaara is the best song of the album. The song has a superb melody, touching lyrics, the singers are superb, be it Mohit or Tarannum Malik, and so is the singing. The orchestration is simple and beautiful. One cannot doubt about the presence of Salman Khan in the song. Basically there isn’t a thing that would leave me in doubt about the song, it just is going to be one of the best this year. The only minor hitch is that the lyrics of the song make me feel that the movie ‘may’ have a sad ending. Hope that isn’t the case. I want the Tiger to remain there.

And yeah, the Tiger Theme is something you have already heard a lot since the very first teaser trailer, most of it. So that one already makes a fan nostalgic, which is a little strange, but quite positive for the movie. Other than the heard part too, the theme has quite some shades and should work perfectly in the background, and once you have seen the movie, on the CD too.

So clearly, this Tiger is going to rock. As per the rumors, Salman may not be too happy about Sohail doing the score for the movie, but the result has come out really well, and Sajid-Wajid’s song turns out the not-so-good piece of the album. As for Sohail’s part, I’d just say, Mashallah.

See Also:

 

Gangs of Wasseypur: Music Review (Sneha Khanwalkar, Piyush Mishra)

No, what’s there about this Anurag Kashyap guy, that every time he comes up with a movie, all these internet addicts, facebookers and twitterati people get up from graves and start writing praises everywhere they can. Why?

I myself am one of those net addicts, and even though I don’t exactly know the answer, it probably lies somewhere in the raw style he has, be it his films or their music. Yes, the man has used some nine composers in his nine directed movies, repeating just one of them, and coming out with different but wonderful music mostly.

This time, Anurag gets Dibakar Bannerjee’s regular composer, Sneha Khanwalkar to compose, as Dibakar goes for Vishal-Shekhar for his Shanghai, which comes in the same month.

And from here on, it’s not Anurag, but Sneha who is the point of interest. More because her music seems as raw as Anurag’s movies.

The first song of the album, Jiya ho Bihar ke lala, is the trend setter, theme setter for the movie. With those lovely beats and Manoj Tiwari, Sneha creates something really rare for the film industry, even though something of similar style should be very common on the streets of Bihar. The song, which is based on a para picked from a Nautanki in Gaya district, justifies the one month research Sneha seems to have done for the song, and Manoj Tiwari sounds like the most natural choice for the song. Full marks for this one.

Hunter, the second song of the album, is all experimental, with the music-melody normal, arrangements and voices used highly experimental, and lyrics quite double-meaning. If you get the lyrics, you’d enjoy the song a lot, else you might just like it for the experimental value.

Womaniya, however, is a simple song for the album. That said, don’t expect Shaan or Sonu Nigam to come up with a ‘dil churaya’ type song. This one is a very typical piece for all those hundred ceremonies (generally before and after weddings) where the elder ladies of the ‘mohalla’ take charge of the dholak and just sit down to share songs which are more jokes than songs. The best part of this one is that Sneha maintains the realness of the song completely with just a few added beats. And yes, if Varun Grover has written those lyrics all by himself, without help from a professional dadi-nani-aunty from the mohalla sangeets, he’s a sooper guy, to say the least.

..paataal mein ghus ja. Jisme ghusna hai ghus le, ghus meri jaan. Teri Keh ke Lunga. Okay, they are not the best words of the song, but they give you an idea of the song. The song, in iteslf, is a little dark, gives you a feel of the movie without even watching it, and you know it’d be running in the background in the xyz type of scenes. Sneha herself, is a little unusual for singer here, but with the words they sing and the way they sing them, the two are worth listening to.

Bhoos. Five minute and ten second song. And forty-five seconds of April fool. 🙂

Yes, the story is little like that only. The first 45 seconds into the song and one sings it’s a soul-stirring number from, say, Piyush Mishra, like that Sheher of Gulaal.. And then, Voila, there is a gentlemen-sangeet. A song that makes you feel like an idiot with its words, but I still love the words, because they are not really idiotic. Also the Nautanki-ish parts in the second half are lovely. One of my personal favorites on the album, probably because I’ve not really heard anything like that ever, despite its simplicity. Manish J Tipu (composer, Phas Gaye Re Obama) and Bhupesh Singh are the names on the cover.

Ik Bagal mein. I mean, there is nothing to say about the song other than it’s a TRADEMARK Piyush Mishra song. I suppose the song is written, composed, arranged, sung by Piyush Mishra only. The song is a masterpiece, and I can listen to it a hundred times. Especially towards the end the song is terrifyingly haunting and just superb, wonderful. The only complaint, it sounds so much like Duniya, despite some lovely sitar and overall difference in arrangements. Still, this one is what you must be looking for if you’re one into serious music.

Bhaiyya is a track which is again experimental, where a performance by Musahar of Sundarpur gets turned into something heavy, but the track is not so much of a success, majorly because you need to work too hard to get the words being sung.

Tain tain toon toon ti ti tee tee ta. Spoiler ahead. The spoiler is that the whole song has similar kind of lyrics, as if someone’s singing a self-made barahkhadi. You can seriously write your own lyrics for the music. Spoiler ends. And the music of the song is quite good.

Soona kar ke gharwa. I don’t know what I found in this simple dhol-manjeera song, but I just loved this one. There aren’t many words in the small song, and everything sounds real. I somehow feel like this is a simple recording from the Gaya Nautanki where Sneha found Jiya ho Bihar ke lala (I did hear jay ho Bihar ke lala in the background in this one). But no official word on this one.

Gareebi tod deti hai jo riste khaas hote hain, aur paraye apne hote hain, jab paise paas hote hain. And one more like that. But it’s the instrumental part after that that was the focus. Still, I didn’t get what really Sneha planned on providing here. Because if there was something played by the baal party, it’s more or less lost in the mixing. Not the favorite.

Womaniya, which comes as a remix-like version here (not called remix, the other version was ‘live’) is one of the highlights, and most probably will be a hit, or a superhit, depends on publicity. Do listen.

There is one song in this album that I don’t want to watch a video for. Manmauji, the song, is something I would have loved to listen on the radio in the afternoon sessions of my summer vacations with mom, without thinking if the song had a video at all. Seriously, my complaint is that the song is just two minutes and fifty-three seconds long. Sneha, wherever you are, if you’re listening, please, please, please create some more songs like that. Khula hai baajuband phata hai kaaj sambhal ke chalna hoga.

Loonga Loonga, a little too much of mixing-remixing. Skipping this one.

Humni ke chhodi ke nagariya e baba. This one from Deepak Kumar – Muzaffarpur is yet another very earthy number. In fact the song reminds me of some music that I have heard within my hometown, and in a very unimagined way, gives me a kind of peace. The only problem is that I don’t really get all the words in the song, hope that will be solved though.

So, the album is something to listen to, and the album is something all those who want to listen to ‘experimental’ music would love to have. Mind you, this album in itself is a complete season of Sound Trippin’ from Sneha. In fact the album tells me that music not always needs to be ‘composed’, you can ‘discover’ music and then produce it. Of course, that too needs a genius, but that would be a genius that would continuously learn, and it seems Sneha Khanwalkar is one such genius. More power to her.

And I hope you know by now why Anurag Kashyap is a guy talked about. No, producing a movie that features THIS music is not everyone’s kind of game. And then, that’s not all. The movie is yet to come. More power to him.

O ri Duniya.. #np

Ishaqzaade: Music Review (Amit Trivedi, Lyrics: Kausar Munir)

And with Ishaqzaade, Amit Trivedi surprises you again.

After listening to Suraj Jagan’s rocking Aafaton ke Parinde, I was expecting some rock from the title song, but Javed Ali’s simple rendition of the title song not only caught me off guard, I knew that the song was going to grow on me. And so it was. Growing on me slowly, every time I heard it. The reasons were plenty. One, the song was quite new for me, as in, it was a simple, nice composition, very much Indian at the heart and Javed Ali sings it very much that way, but it has sax and western drums, which give way to Indian style beats. That was just some analysis I could do, I hope you get the essence. The song suddenly shifting from Javed to Shreya at the end is interesting, though nothing really new, yet Shreya once again surprises with her singing, or rather the voice here. Just listen to the song. A few times.

Hua Chhokra Jawan re. An Amit Trivedi desi song, with a touch of brass band effect, mostly from the drums used. Sunidhi Chauhan is the best part of the song, as the lyrics get full justice done to them the way she sings them. Vishal Dadlani is definitely not bad, but he didn’t here need the depth that generally comes with his voice, and I’m not such a big fan of his masti-mood songs, like Dhaeon-Dhaeon, and this. Still, interesting stuff, to say the least. Worth a try definitely.
Continue reading “Ishaqzaade: Music Review (Amit Trivedi, Lyrics: Kausar Munir)”

Tezzz: Music Review (Sajid-Wajid)

Recently I was watching an interview of Sonu Nigam. Money was being discussed and Sonu was asked if there are music directors for whom he sings for free at times. And the answer was yes, but the first name he took was a bit of a surprise for me. It was none other than Sajid-Wajid. Not like I don’t have reasons to believe they are good composers or Sonu Nigam shouldn’t enjoy great relationship with them (he got his biggest pop hit, Deewana, from Sajid-Wajid), but it just wasn’t a big enough name somehow. I think that’s gonna change now.

Yep. Sajid-Wajid sound like a very ’90s composers at times, but their greatness exists in the fact that even when they sound like ’90s, they are so good with it that you end up loving them. The only problems they have had is that they have not really been very consistent, and of course, they haven’t had very big names to work with, with a regular exception of Salman Khan. The latter is changing, and I hope that the former changes too.

OK that was a long prologue for a small album with just four original tracks, though there are twelve versions on the disk. So here we go on Tezzz.

The album starts with the gem of a song called Tere bina tere bina dil naiyo lagda, sung by Rahat Fateh Ali Khan. A nice melody, and quite some Nadeem-Shravan’ish treatment is what the song has, but neither of the two is mediocre and some simple singing from Rahat is enough to make the song lovable. And that is what it is. Lovely.

Tezzz title song sung by Sunidhi is an average number, with a little Abbas-Mustan feel to it, which seems to be going with the movie. Sunidhi’s singing is good here, but the results are more or less just okay. Maybe the song will be liked a bit more with time and promotion.

Mohit Chauhan singing for Sajid-Wajid is something rare, if not a first. However, the duo give the master singer a song that fits his voice perfectly and the treatment is more or less the same as he generally gets from Pritam, with an added Chorus for him singing tere saaye mein, which makes the romantic song more devotional. A simple, light, romantic number, with the added chorus adding a little more to the song.

Laila, the next by Sunidhi is an average number again, and somehow after not liking it after listening to it a few times, didn’t feel like listening to it more. Passable.

For the next track, Shreya Ghoshal comes to sing Tere bina tere bina, which sounds perfectly good, but a little more ‘old’, a little more ’90s. Probably because Rahat’s adds a little twist to a song, you don’t feel it so much in the male version. However, worth a listen for sure. Do listen and decide for yourself if you like this one more.

Shaan’s version of Tezzz is not really great. Wondering if this could have been given to KK. Not sticking much on remixes, I shift towards the sad version of Tere Bina, which I presume could be better with a few more twists thrown in with that simplicity. The last thing I would like to say a little about is Tere Bina (Indian) version. Sudden thought: It’s still Rahat singing, so how’s it more Indian? Well, jokes apart, the version is a little more towards Aashiqui as beats come more from the Tabla here and that IS nice, but I think a little more Indianization of the version could make things more interesting.

Overall, Tezzz has got quite some nice music from Sajid-Wajid, even if it doesn’t go equally in all the songs. Other than that, the album has got a little too many versions. I think if you don’t want to go into much and want to get the sure shot numbers, go for Rahat’s version of Tere Bina and Mohit’s Main hoon shab. And if it’s a little more, you can try the Indian version and Shreya’s version as well.

Ek Deewana Tha: Music Review (A R Rahman)

we have an awesome start, an almost perfect Hosanna, a lovely Sharminda Hoon, a romantically touching zohra-jabeen, and a lot many average to above average to even good other tracks. I guess that good enough for now. Isn’t it?

Also, after taking a look at some more reviews, I think it would be better to mention that I have not heard Vinnaithaandi Varuvaya and hence the review is from the perspective of a person who has NOT heard the original album, and listening to all the tunes for the first time.

Full Review on New Happysing.

Ek Main aur Ekk Tu: Music Review (Amit Trivedi)

Ek main aur Ekk tu is a good album, with some variety thrown in by Amit Trivedi. It’s not his type 1, with Anurag Kashyap connection and lots of rock, but type 2, something like Aisha, where there is variety, and freshness. However, I can feel a touch of Anjaana Anjaani in the album, in some of the songs.

Read Full Review here.

Agneepath: Music P-review (Ajay-Atul)

Check Full Review HERE.

The music of Agneepath is supposed to released in 10 days still, but the promotional tracks are out, somehow the thirty second previews were enough to make me write a review, based on promo track, so you can call it a preview as well.

Kamsin kamariya saali ik thumke se lakh maare, note hazaaron ke khulle chhutta karane aayi. Well, Chikni Chameli, featured on Katrina Kaif, is not just interesting with lyrics, its music is attractive and more than everything, Shreya Ghoshal’s singing is surprising. Gonna wait for the song.

Ajay-Atul. Roop Kumar Rathod. A song that says ‘sehme hue sapne mere haule haule angdaiyaan le rahe, thehre hue lamhe mere nayi nayi gehraiyaan le rahe, zindagi ne pehni hai muskaan.’ Seriously, do you need to know more? Again, I am waiting for the album! 😐

Deva Shree Ganesh is one song that is a little regular, probably because of the subject as well. Reminds me of Don’s bappa moriya, and probably not as zealous, but can’t be sure about the latter in a 30 second preview again.

What again beats me is Sonu Nigam’s Abhi mujh mein kahin. Sonu’s singing is getting worth songs after some long break it seems. Recently he sang a nice song in Lanka and now this. Lovely.

Shah ka Rutba sung by Sukhwinder seemed to be Dabangg pattern from the name, but the song has a different flavor and goes more in Azeem o shaan shehenshah in terms of lyrics, and the music is a little qawwali’ish. Not too great from the promo, but definitely a like.

Gun Gun Guna ye gaana re sung by Sunidhi Chauhan and Udit Narayan seems to be a break from Sunidhi’s recent series of (mostly average) item numbers, as the song sounds like a light number. Also, Udit Narayan, who does not feature in the promo track should be something to cheer as he is not generally seen in albums nowadays and lately I have started missing his voice to some extent.

So all in all, Agneepath looks like something that can be bought on the day it gets launched. I don’t think anyone’s going to be disappointed. And yes, Ajay-Atul are definitely here to stay.

For Full Review, Check HERE.

Lanka: Music Review (Toshi-Sharib, Gaurav Dagaonkar, Rishabh)

I wanted to write a review for Lanka since I heard it for the first time, say a week ago at least, but somehow couldn’t do it yet. Finally writing it now.

The album starts with Iltija, Rishabh Srivastava’s song from his debut album Iltija. The song on the Bhatt pattern is an okay composition and sung okay too, making an okay though a little unevenly spaced start.

The next song Aap ki Aahat, composed by Toshi-Sharib sounds like the beginning of Bhatt-camp-song again as the beginning seconds remind me of aye kaash, kash yoon hota, but then the young Sabri brothers get into a different mood as they compose a slower tune for Sonu Nigam to sing, with some interesting lyrics as well. Nice one, something that Sonu Nigam sounds nice singing.

Sheet Lahar, composed by Gaurav and sung by Shreya, is a slow, nice composition with simple lyrics. The slow pace of the song may not appeal to all and definitely not one for ‘quick listening’ but if you give it time, lyrics as well Shreya’s singing would appeal to you. Nice job by Gaurav Dagaonkar.

The next song is again by Gaurav Dagaonkar, and is my favorite from the movie. Yup, it’s KK singing, where the irritation claimed by the lyrics can almost be heard in his voice. Barham hain hum is something to listen to, definitely.

Qubool, the next, is a regular Toshi-Sharib song, sung by Toshi, but then the song has an added dose of good lyrics, that too in prayer to god, making the song nicer to listen. Liked.

Sheet Leher comes in a different version, this time sung by Tia Bajpai, and sounds okay.

The last one from the album, Sunidhi Chauhan’s Hai Rama Rama, composed by Toshi-Sharib, doesn’t seem to be any purpose more than being yet another item number in the movie.

Overall, however, the album is good, with Gaurav Dagaonkar giving some good numbers while Toshi-Sharib give more or less their average, which is good, to say the least. Do listen to the album especially for Sonu, Shreya, n KK’s songs.

Players: Music Review (Pritam)

Ten tracks, five songs and rest reprises and remixes. Typical Pritam.

Jis jagah khatam sabki baat hoti hai is again a patterned one with Neeraj Shridhar, SIddharth, Mauli, and an almost chorus, and sounds quite like an Abbas Mustan movie song, but works fine.

The second song, Jhoom jhoom jhoomta tu ja, is not just a different one for Pritam, but a lovely one and a well chosen voice. The song has a little Turkish-Arabic touch, a hint of belly dance numbers, but still the tune doesn’t get all alien. Reminds me of Hawa hawa a bit too. But what I loved here was Ritu Pathak’s voice whose voice has been used by Pritam before but not so well.

The third one, however, did not sound that interesting to me. Yashita Yashpal’s Ho gayi tun has a tune that might sound addictive, but not so soon. Not on my list for now. Maybe promos or more listening change the opinion.

The next, Isko Buddhi Do Bhagwan, is a hit material, though quality might not be the aim here. The lyrics are too simple and so is the tune, but it’s Url (Earl)’s Abhishek Bachchan like voice that might do the trick here. As for Shruti Pathak, it’s probably her voice’s worst use till date.

Enter Pritam and Mohit, with Shreya, to make you go mad, again, like always. Dil ye bekaraar kyun hai, tujhpe aetbaar kyun hai, kyun hai ye khumaar kyun hai.. whatever. The whole point is that Pritam can do it with Mohit a hundred times and still get amazing results. God knows how. Just do listen. They do it for the umpteenth time.

Siddharth Basrur’s version of Jhoom jhoom goes with a very different style when compared to that of Ritu. While the first one was all about ‘nice’ singing, this is almost about mad singing. I mean Siddharth seems to be singing a song that was made for Atif here, and interestingly, still manages to sound good. Catchy and yet looks like it’ll have some good shelf life.

Dil ye Beqarar kyun hai appears again, this time with Nikhil D’Souza singing the reprise. Pritam once again keeps him with more techno version, but this time his voice has been processed a bit too. Still the song does sound nice. And though the first choice still is Mohit’s version, I don’t think I’ll be listening to this version very less. Priyani Vani sounds okay.

And then the final, film version of Jhoom Jhoom comes from Arijit Singh, who sings probably his first solo here, and does it really well for a beginner.

As for the remixes, there are two, for the first song of Neeraj and Mohit’s Dil ye bekaraar kyun hai. None too special, though I was wondering if it was Nikhil’s voice in the background of the latter.

Overall, Players is once again a lovely album from Pritam where he mostly creates what he is an expert at, with one or two new things here and there. Dil ye beqaraar and Jhoom Jhoom are definitely the two to look forward to.