Dus Tola: Music Review (Sandesh, Gulzar)

Aisa hota tha is a not so slow song made by two masters of slow pieces, Sandesh Shandilya and Mohit Chauhan. I’m not doubting their talent with faster music, but both are generally known for their taste in slower music and here they come up with a likeable, fast, but not much western song. The percussion in the song is worth listening to. Certainly not bad, and then there are some good lyrics too.

Somehow, when I read the title Jee na jalayiyo with Sukhwinder’s name, I was hoping that the song would be good. And as soon as Sukhwinder came in to the song, I got a feel that my prediction was going right. The song is quite Indianized in the feel and in its quite down to earth lyrics too, but somehow the drums in the song say something else. A bit confused if I will be liking this mix a lot, though the song doesn’t sound bad. Again, the lyrics of the song are quite good, better than aisa hota tha in first look.

When I heard the song Laal-Laal-Laal hua patta chinaar ka, I suddenly felt the song was too Gulzar-ish and decided to look for the lyricist. And there was my surprise, it was actually Gulzar, a fact I had totally missed. Anyway, the review continues, this song being a bit beat-based and a bit heard type, even though I can’t exactly place where I have heard such music. In fact with this song I could find similarity in the composing styles of Amit Mishra who composed for Atithi tum kab jaoge.

Either way, the song has some awesome lyrics by Gulzar, they remind me of Maachis. And though the music isn’t half as deep as Vishal’s, it has some effect of chappa chappa on the composing style. A good song overall. Especially in case you have an ear for good lyrics.

Sonu Nigam’s tumse kya kehna is a slow, really slow song and for the first few seconds I was thinking if the song was moving at all. But after some time, Sonu’s softness and the slow melody of the song sound quite likeable and the chorus is effective, but short. I can feel Gulzar’s lyrics again though visibly intentional talk of gold makes things a bit not-that-great. Not bad. Not too good either. Not at the start at least.

The only time a female voice is heard in the song is when Sunidhi Chauhan comes up to sing a female version of Jee na jalayiyo. As she sings the song in her style, it sounds quite different from Sukhwinder’s version though both sound equally good.

Overall, Dus Tola is nothing too great, but for those with a taste for good lyrics and slow music, it is worth a listen for sure. Especially I’d recommend Laal-laal, and if you like that, then maybe the entire album. 🙂

Tujhko jo paaya, to jeena aaya..

When a Pritam album comes out, the first thing I look for is whether the album has a KK song or not. The next comes which song is sung by Mohit Chauhan and then what is there by Neeraj Shridhar. Then comes the rest.

But this time I was surprised with myself and the album, and of course with the guy who made it happen. There is a song called Mere bina, which goes like ‘Mere Bina main, rehne laga hoon/ teri hawaon mein, behne laga hoon/ jaane main kaise, tera hua hoon/ mujhe to lagta hai main shayad tere dil ki dua hoon/ tujhko jo paaya, to jeena aaya/ ab ye lamha theher jaye tham jaye bas jaye hum dono ke darmiyaan.’ The song is sung by Mohit Chauhan, KK and that new guy called Nikhil D’Souza. By the way, if you have never heard the name, NIkhil recently sang Anjaana Anjaani ki Kahani for Vishal-Shekhar. For those who want to know more, he’s a SUTASI finalist, and probably a post-topic for near future.

Anyway, coming back to the song, the song has three instances, and since the makers don’t want people to think ‘why have they given one song thrice’ with their very first looks at the album cover, they have the song with two names, Mere Bina and Tujhko Jo paaya. Mere Bina and its Unplugged version are sung by Nikhil and KK respectively while Tujhko jo paaya, which also sounds like an even more unplugged version, is given to Mohit.

This was the detail. Now comes what is interesting, what makes me write this post. The interesting part is that even with Mohit Chauhan and KK present in the album with the same song, and have sung it in their well known, lovable styles, I’m falling for the version sung by this new guy, Nikhil.

Reasons. One. The guy has an awesome voice and has sung the song just wonderfully. Even though KK and Mohit are as good as ever, Nikhil sounds not just good but new too, and that might be an added plus. Two. His version of the song is really well arranged, the music is definitely good but the way all the experimenting is done on the song, like reversing the beats, it’s just wonderful. (Reversing the beats is not a technical term as far as I know but if you haven’t got what I mean by that, listen to the beats at ‘raahon pe teri’ near 1:52 minutes and observe the similar phenomenon happening in between the song. At the phrase, it gets quite pronounced.) Loved all of it.

And if I still need to say this, I am totally in love with the music of the song, and the lyrics are good too, if not very.

As the last word, I think I know that I’ll be looking for one new name on the album covers now.

PS: Mohit’s version of the song sounds really good too, as he’s been given a completely different task with same lyrics and melody.

Crook. Pritam Again.

Crook is once again something wonderful by Pritam, this time with Babu Mann’s support.

The first song, Chhalla, is definitely a superb thing. Babu Mann’s song, which is so-heard, so-lovable, so-wonderful thing, I need not say will be an instant hit. Babu’s singing is lovable too. Btw, the song has Suzanne D’Mello singing too. Though she comes a second this time as Babu steals all the magic. Tadada-Tadada-Tada-dada.

Enters Nikhil D’Souza. If you’re reading the album covers carefully, you’d easily be knowing that the guy is progressing like anything and has sung with as varied composers as Amit Trivedi, Vishal-Shekhar and now Pritam, all that in less than two months. Well, the guy sounds pretty good and quite easy on ears, especially here as he sings Mere Bina, a slow, not-too-soft, but quite beautiful song for Pritam. Listen to the song. I can tell you’ll love it more every time.
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Anjaana Anjaani. Musical Surprise.

The very first on Anjaana Anjaani. After IHLS I was somehow expecting pretty high from the album, but Vishal-Shekhar go beyond my expectations. It’s certainly worth a listen.

The album starts with Anjaana Anjaani ki Kahani which is already there on televisions for quite sometime. While the short promo of the song rocks, the song, sung by Monali and Nikhil D’Souza offers a bit more and you get something that is sure shot party material.

The second, Hairat, is a hairat for me. I mean, surprise. Not that I was expecting anything less with Lucky Ali there but the way he sings so lively at the age of 51 simply amazes me. And then, before I start on Lucky’s singing, another thing that amazed me in the album was Vishal Dadlani’s lyrics. He’s always been good with lyrics of kinda fun and rocking songs, but here he impresses with his poetry. As for Lucky’s singing and V-S composition, will it suffice to say that I find it difficult to move to the next song?

Anyway, I move to the next and I’m welcomed by Rahat Fateh Ali Khan’s Aas Paas Khuda is typical and good. Something that I’m repeating about Rahat songs a lot, but then I guess Rahat is being kinda stereotyped compared to his immense talent for whatsoever reasons. Still, like most of the times, Vishal-Shekhar add some bits here and there trying to make things more interesting, and I’d say it works. In short, a typical Rahat song of the times we live in.

I have always been a fan of Vishal and Shekhar’s voices, and so the next song Tumse hi Tumse is a treat for me. As the song starts with guitar, I think for a moment if something like Bin Tere unplugged was coming, but the moment passes quickly and the song turns into what I’d say a Lucky’ish mode as soon as Shekhar starts singing. Caralisa’s quite fast English (rap?) sounds interesting to say the least, but the hero of this one is Shekhar Ravjiani. He’s going to get more people saying, ‘This is for you Shekhar!’ Oh, btw, the end of the song has some nice effects on Caralisa’s voice. This simple but beautiful one is a must listen.

As far as I remember, while the world was (and is) standing in queue outside Mohit Chauhan’s home, Vishal-Shekhar were doing it pretty fine without the guy and now that they make him sing a composition of theirs, he gets more than what you can say a typical Mohit Chauhan song. This time Mohit comes with a sad song, Tujhe Bhula Diya. The best part of the song though, for me, was Shruti Pathak’s wonderful start where she sings with near-zero background music. From here on Mohit picks up and where he comes to a still, Shekhar comes with an entry somewhat like Jogi Mahi, with the difference that here things don’t get high like that. Anyway, the point is that the song sounds good from the very first time and the more you hear it, the more you like it.

The next song, I Feel Good, goes on the well-known rock abilities of Vishal and equally unknown rock abilities of Shilpa Rao. Vishal starts singing the song in his soft voice in a way that for once can sound like Shankar Mahadevan’s voice. And then Vishal and Shilpa both completely rock me with the song. The interesting thing is that while the song is something normal for Vishal, it’s strange how Shilpa Rao never (with an exception of Woh Ajnabee, to some extent I guess) sang such a song and was kept to soft numbers with (her) heavy voice. I hope to see her to get more rocking numbers now.

Even more interestingly, the next song, which is the title, Anjaana Anjaani, again has Vishal and Shilpa, this time in a bit different mood. It’s not exactly rock but falls somewhere nearby, something like Sadka Kiya. I never had doubts about Vishal’s abilities as singer but the way he goes singing such wonderful songs, I’m bound to say he’s more a complete musician rather than a composer.

The next track happens to be the remix of Tujhe bhula diya. The track doesn’t impress me, but strangely, it strengthens my belief in the original track. Never mind.

And after a noisy sounding remix, the end comes as a beautiful unplugged version of Aas Paas hai Khuda by Rahat Fateh Ali Khan and Shruti Pathak. Strange to see an extra name in an unplugged version, but then, nobody questions a miracle. Though, for some reason unknown to me too, I didn’t find this one as great and superb and marvelous as Shekhar’s version of bin tere in IHLS. Maybe I’m too fascinated by his voice.

Overall, Anjaana Anjaani is a superb soundtrack. V-S align a bit towards rock, and on the negative side, there are a few things that sound repetitive from them (like one inside Tujhe Bhula Diya) but the overall end result is something that you can rock yourself on, dance to, or simply cherish in a relaxing mood, in short, a perfect soundtrack. As I said, more than I expected.

My favorites (as of now): Hairat, I feel good, Anjaana Anjaani (Vishal-Shilpa), Aas Paas Khuda unplugged, Tumse hi Tumse. And the best part, it’s not easy to decide.

Update: As anticipated (written too), Tujhe Bhula Diya is sounding better every time I hear it. So much so that it is probably the most heard song of the album now, beyond the rest.

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Music Review: Robot: Hindi

Robot, the Hindi version of Rajnikant-Aishwarya’s Enthiran was a much waited album, composed by A R Rahman. Here is a review of the album.

The album starts with O Naye Insaan and you get to know that this Robot is going to be actually robotic. The song anyhow sounds good as Srinivas croons in two almost different voices, doing the awesome work that is done by two people in Tamil and Telugu. The song has a deep electronic effect and you can feel you’re listening to some sci-fi music. The song is mechanical from the very start and the beginning is the most interesting, I’d say addictively so. But the lyrics are too tough and I doubt many people would be able to understand much in the first few times. Khatija, Rahman’s daughter who sings for the first time here, sounds like a child and I guess it’ll take some time before she should come to sing full-fledged.
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Ten ‘Pop’ songs you shouldn’t miss

‘Pop’ is a genre of music, but for me, it’s been private albums and bands, which made all the ‘pop’ for me in childhood, and I still use the word like that many times. Hence, today I present a list of my favorite ‘pop’ songs, in no particular order, hoping that some of the songs that deserve to be heard reach a few more people.

Tere Naina (Jhoomo re/ Kailasa): One song I love like anything. I can listen to this one at any time, anywhere. And I just love it always. Deep, soulful, moving Kailasa.

Kothay Uttay (Saari Raat/ Devika): A song based on Hindustani Classical music as per the album cover of Saari Raat. A piece with some soft beats and lovable music. Barkha Bahar of the same album is a close too.

Meri Tarah (Fitoor/ Mohit Chauhan): It’s difficult choosing one song in this nostalic-ish album of Mohit. My guess is I picked this one for its awesome lyrics, which are again penned by the singing genius himself. A soft, lovable one in that super voice.

Har Jagah mein (Tu hi mere Rab ki tarah hai/ Mithoon): Mithoon’s album never made it big, but there were some good song in the debut album of this little master of music and this one is probably one of them. I’d say a typical Mithoon song with him at his best.

Mann Chandre (Connections/ A R Rahman): A R Rahman. Sukhwinder Singh. And a bit-sad, bit-philosphical, punjabi song. Do I need to say more? I guess not. Still I’d say, listen to the awesome chorus in the song. Rahman is not one who uses a chorus too much, but when he does, the effect is something like you can see here.

Mehfooz (Mehfooz/ Euphoria): Euphoria at its best is not always euphoric. Sometimes it’s sad, sometimes it cries out loud. Mehfooz might not be the top selling album of the band but the title song of the album is as deep and touching as any of their best hits. At par with mayeri and ab na ja, mehfooz is something to cherish forever.

Rain bhai kaari kaari (Humsafar/ KK): I don’t know what I should call this song, but it’s like a mix of somewhat classical stuff with some rock mood. KK, in his album Humsafar, sings this wonderful song called rain bhai kaari kaari din ujiyara. All I’d say is, listen to it, at least once.

Kaise jiye hain hum (Maheroo/ Jojo): I remembered Jojo for that mad song called Woh Kaun thi since my childhood, and then there was Maheroo, his other album after a long time. Hoping for a great album, I did listen to the whole album. Well, album wasn’t all that great but there was a song that I completely fell in love with. Kaise Jiye hain hum. A nostalgic song from someone destroyed in love (line copied from Fanaa), it has a nostalgia mix too, with the sound of a train. Interestingly, the mix is worth a try too.

Saiyyan (Jhoomo re/ Kailasa): Another song of the best of Kailash Kher. Came after Teri Deewani. Though popular, the song couldn’t do so well as Teri Deewani, but I think I love this one more. Only two words for the song – Kailash Kher.

Door Kahin (Nine): I hope you reach the end of this post, because Door kahin of Pankaj Awasthi is not only a favorite of mine, it’s different too. It’s a romantic song, with lyrics deep dpwn in romanticism, but it’s nothing like a typical romantic song. A wonderful thing to listen to.

Just do tell me if you like the songs. And also if u don’t.

Tip: I’m bookmarking this page myself. 🙂

Raajneeti: Music Review

Quite opposite to once expectations and Prakash Jha’s image, Raajneeti seems to be a full fledged musical once you read the names of composers and singers on the cover of this album. And most of them succeed in doing it to quite an extent. Yes, Raajneeti has it’s fare share of good music. Here is more.

The album starts with Bheegi si, bhaagi si, which is a peppy, foot-tapping, Pritam type song sung by Mohit Chauhan with a relatively very new Antara Mitra who sounds something like Shreya Ghoshal. A good one to say the least. Catchy. Not long term, but not bad certainly.
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Bheegi si Bhaagi si: Raajneeti

Is It Shreya Ghoshal? No. Antara Mitra.

Well, this is all that was running in my mind when I heard this song called Bheegi si, bhaagi si. I still don’t remember bheegi si bhaagi si reminds me of which song sung by Shreya Ghoshal, but I was certainly surprised to know that This one was sung by Antara Mitra. Oops! I know that name. From that Tabu movie with Pritam, Toh Baat Pakki. She had sung a really small, but awesome piece of Aarti, without music. And I was in love with that voice. And the voice is here.
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Badmaash Company: Music Review

When Pritam composes for YRF, things somehow don’t happen to be his best. At least for past sometime, with an exception of New York to some extent. Dil Bole Hadippa went bad, and Badmaash Company doesn’t look too good, though the soundtrack of Badmaash Company is good enough to hear for some time. Here is a review.
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Well Done Abba: Music Review

It’s not always that you get two back to back good movie albums within 24 hours. So good that I didn’t have time to listen to Shafqat Amanat Ali’s new album even though I loved his previous one, Tabeer. So here it comes, after Lahore, album of Well Done Abba, a Shyam Benegal movie.

The first song of the album is Meri banno Hoshiyaar sung by Ila Arun (with Daniel B George), who sings her own words on a tune that is almost Saiyyaan Jhoothon ka Bada Sartaj Nikla of V Shantaram’s Do Aankhen Baarah Hath, in a full folk manner, on an orchestration that reminds me of Rahman’s Genda Phool. But frankly, the song is completely new and has it’s identity completely different from both the songs I named here, something not at all easy. Ila is obviously superb in her singing and the Telugu counting in the background (Okkati, Rendu, Moodu, Naalgu…) is something in it’s own ranks. Must listen song.
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Fitoor (Mohit Chauhan): Music Review

Fitoor: Mohit Chauhan

Fitoor is not Mohit Chauhan the superhit singer who gives a hit everytime he sings. It’s Mohit Chauhan the artist who wants to share the art he knows. One who sings for himself. If you like him in this way, it’s good. If you do not, almost every movie has a Mohit Chauhan song, the hit one, anyway.

One thing worth noticing about the album is that Mohit has not only sung the songs but he has even composed and written all the songs of the album. Now that is a one man show for which he must be applauded. Brave guy Mohit.

Fitoor: The opening song. Opens well but gets lost somewhere in between and the song remains just OK. Mohit has tried to keep the song off the typical Mukhda-antara way and tried some changes. But the result doesn’t give something exceptional. Still, feels worth listening after listening a few times.

Challeya: Challeya is a good composition and a good song overall. The song is well written and well sung. The good quality of sound mixing is also visible in the song. Go for this one.

Sajna: Sajna is an offbeat song with hints of typical Mohit Chauhan at the beginning and end of the song. You may like it after listening to the song for a few times. Good one. Continue reading “Fitoor (Mohit Chauhan): Music Review”