Matru ki Bijlee ka Mandola: Music Review (Vishal Bhardwaj)

Vishal. Means Big. So he is, and this time, so is the soundtrack. Literally and figuratively.

The man who brought us rock way back in 2003 and Kalinka in 2011 (as Darling) is this time here with a soundtrack of no less than twelve songs, ranging from Prem Dehati’s renderings to Zulu.

Of course, you get the taste of Gulzar’s pen in the album.

The album begins with the heard-by-everyone title track, that does nothing but makes you dance. There is a madness in the tune, and Gulzar’s lyrics maintain that madness. My guess is that you would have danced to it already. If not, do that, cuz you need not be a dancer to dance to this tune.

The second song of the album, Khamakha Nahi has a foreign element (I dunno which country really) in the beginning chorus, and then it gives you a taste of something like Bekaraan. The romantic track has some simple lyrics by Gulzar, which one can almost identify as his. Loved it.

Oye Boy Charlie, sung by Rekha with Shankar Mahadevan and Mohit is one lovely piece from the album. The song has an English title, desi Gulzar’ed lyrics, desi music and earthy voices. To top it all, the visuals are quite interesting with a comic element. Listen to it. Watch it.

The next track, Hatt Lootnewale, has some lyrics against oppression, and the music isn’t too attractive. But the song has got the best of the singers, as Sukhwinder Singh and Master Saleem, something that may change the listeners’ perception in due time. The popularity of the song will depend a lot on the story/picturization and publicity.

Next comes Shara-ra-ra. A small, one n a half minute track, sung by Prem Dehati. The song is a earthy track with the music, lyrics, and even the brass-band based arrangements being village type. However, this doesn’t sound like Piyush Mishra earthy. So, good, but not exceptionally so.

Badal Uthya ri Sakhi. That’s what the best song of the album is called. The track, sung by Rekha (and later by Prem Dehati in Reprise) is ma’am singing in a full classic-folk mood, with minimal music, and a Sitar ruling the background. The song is actually an old folk song from Haryana and quite popular there. So you know what it is. Do listen. And listen. And let it grow on you.

The joke was, after his debut in Mausam, this guy gets two songs in Vishal Bhardwaj’s Matru ki Bijlee ka Mandola. His name is Pankaj Kapur.

Pankaj sings the next two tracks of the album, which are fun, but would be enjoyed actually when the movie comes out, or at least the video comes out. Pankaj’s singing shows you one side of theatre artist that has hardly been touched by cinema. Try the tracks, or wait for the videos.

The next track is a first in India. It’s called Nomvula, and it’s Zulu music, sung by Umoja [Umoja means Unity in Swahili]. Even the lyrics of the song have been imported, without any Hindi/English being added to them. The music is nice, but I guess an adaptation, maybe something like Kalinka, would be better.

The end of the album comes with a reprise version of Badal Uthiya by Prem Dehati, and a small one for Lootnewale, sung by Sukhwinder. Badal Uthya is ‘almost’ as good as by Rekha, and Sukhwinder’s Lootnewale sounds a little more less noisy than the original version.

Overall, the album has a lot in terms of variety, and some tracks are wonderful; Khamakha, Oye Boy, and Badal Uthya to name the best. But then a few elements were missing too. Both the songs by Rekha are good, but Sukhwinder this time doesn’t seem to have got his fair share despite the number of tracks. When the album was over, I even missed Suresh Wadkar who’s been there for most of Vishal’s albums, including 7KM.

So yes, the album is good. Vishal has done some good work. And it’s worth listening to. But the thirst that came with the big size, isn’t quenched.

Ye Stupid Pyaar: Music Review (Vipin Patwa)

The album begins with Nikhil D’Souza’s Lamha Lamha, and though the song doesn’t seem to be one for a long life, Nikhil’s voice is nice and the music and lyrics are average, making the song an okay one.

Second song in a row begins in such a way that you are bound to think if the composer is some old follower of Pritam. Anyway, KK sings the simple tune of Tere naam se in his lovely voice, almost reminding me of hothon se chhoo lo tum, mera geet amar kar do. I mean, I wonder how many songs have risen in standard simply because of the voice and the way of singing of KK. Not an exceptionally good track, but you’d most probably like to listen to it.
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Sahi Dhandhe Galat Bande: Music Review (Siddharth-Suhas, Dhruv, Mahavir)

Sahi Dhandhe Galat Bande starts with Siddharth-Suhas composed Naina wali whiskey dul dul jave, sung by Shahid Malliya. The song, though nothing new in it, can be quite addictive if given a little time. A typical Punjabi dance number.

The next song, Desi Jat Posse, sung by Mahi with Suhas, is again a typical Punjabi number with some twists added to it. The song sounds fine, but the original version may be a little low for a dance number, but then that is taken care of by the remix.

Dhruv Dhalla’s Mast Kalandar with some funny Punjabi lyrics and easy addictive music again has potential to become popular.

Siddharth-Suhas’s next, Door na jaana sounds like a level above other songs of the album. The song, with a nice melody has some nice arrangements as well and Suhas chooses to sing this one himself. The only song with no Punjabi touch, in both lyrics and music, quite stands out here anyway.

Dhruv’s next, Baraf mein tension milake pee ja, is another tapori-style dance number with not much of Punjabi. Likeable.

The last song of Siddharth-Suhas, Thap denge sung by Master Saleem, is not really an impressive composition, but Saleem’s voice puts some life in the song nonetheless, making the song okay to listen to.

The last song of the album is a composition of Master Mahavir Chopra, who sings his composition Oh Lalaji himself, with lyrics from Late Lakshmichand. This one, with very real village-like music and arrangements, sounds like a Bhajan in Haryanvi style of Hindi. Please let me know if I am wrong here.

Overall, Sahi Dhandhe Galat Bande is not really something new, but works on old patterns, most of it Punjabi, with some experiments in some places, and gives an okay, listenable result.

Buy Sahi Dhandhe Galat Bande audio CD Here.

U R My Jaan: Music Review (Sanjeev Darshan)

The album starts with Shaan’s feel-like-’90s Kya kare dil bechara. The song has an okay melody and doesn’t sound really good, but doesn’t sound bad either. An okay one, reminding me of Anu Malik days of the ’90s.

The next song, that is the title track, is very Nadeem-Shravan’ish in its arrangements and is sung by Sanjeev himself with Shilpa Rao to support. The song is a good listen if you put it a few years back, but today, it seems the song could have been worked on a little more. Also, bringing in a professional singer instead of Sanjeev could be helpful.

The third track, Mera Maula Kare, sung by Roop Kumar Rathod, is a good one. The only thing that disappoints a bit is the climax of the melody after the lovely build up, but once you have heard it, the song does sound good. Sanjeev Darshan do create something worthy of their uncle’s voice here.

The next song, Shreya’s Main Zameen pe hoon, sounded like the most complete song of the album to me. Not that the song is the best of the album, but the way the composer duo have made this one, it doesn’t feel like there is anything left to do, hence giving a feeling of completion for the type of the song it is. Peppy, well sung, nice.

The Next track, bin tere we mahi, sung by Master Salim and Richa Sharma is a nice Qawwali’ish composition and though there is nothing much new in the song, it’s worth a listen as the singers have done a good job here.

The last track of the album, Chand wahi hai, is a nice sounding, seen and heard so many times, romantic track sung by Javed Ali and Shreya Ghoshal. Okay end to the album.

Overall, the album is not great and is kinda insignificant, but is not as bad as I had expected it to be. Sanjeev Darshan are yet to be good enough to compete with today’s composers and to an extent, still have to come out of ’90s phase, but it was a nice try from them here.

Thank You: Music Review

Anees Bazmee definitely does things in an upside down way. That’s how there is Thank You after Welcome. This one again comes from the Pritam’s Factory of Dance-n-forget Music. Here comes a review.

The album starts with Mika’s Pyaar do Pyaar lo, that you might have caught on TV. The oldie-newie song sounds more like a remix and looks very much like a try to redo apni to jaise taise from Housefull. I guess Pritam has been successful, but not so much as SEL were with theirs.

The next song, Razia, is sung by Saleem and Ritu Pathak, but Saleem can be confused for a girl with his high pitch here. Allah bachaye meri jaan ki razia gundon mein phans gayi sounds like a typical item song and Ritu sounds pretty good with her singing. Nothing new, just another good product from the Factory.
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7 Khoon Maaf: Music Review: Saat Khoon Maaf

Vishal Bhardwaj is here again.

Well, Darling, the Russian connection of Vishal Bhardwaj is definitely a well composed, well sung piece and similarities as well as differences from Kalinka are quite beautifully done. While Vishal gets the music catchy and haunting, Rekha Bharadwaj sings the song once again with a new touch to her voice. But the voice that gets it the best there is that of Usha Uthup. Kudos to Vishal for using her voice with such precision. The last word on the song: Daaaarrrrrling…

Bekaraan hain bekaraan, aankhein band keeje na, doobne lage hain hum, saans lene deeje na. Well, if I tell you that the song is sung by Vishal Bhardwaj, you’d probably be able to even guess the tune. I mean, so very predictable, and predictably lovely and beautiful too.

Vishal Bhardwaj is back. From the days of Paanch. Yeah, Vishal gets KK back after years, and for something similar. KK rocks in this one, and though Vishal rocks, the slight negative is that like other songs of the album, you have something to compare with it already. This time I was thinking about Sar jhuka khuda hoon main while listening to the song. But then, khuda hoon main didn’t have Gulzar. The lines here are just awesome in some places. Like Gulzar. After all, he can rock too.

Awaara Awaara Awaara. Master Salim sings this one for Vishal and comes up with one of the best things of the album. The music, the words, and the depth in Saleem’s voice go along, making it an experience worth experiencing. Interestingly while the song reminds me of albela sajan ghar aayo re, it also reminds me of Naina and Rahat Fateh Ali Khan. And the greatness of the two songs is proof enough to how good the song would be. Na shaakh jude, na jad pakde, mausam mausam banjara.. aawara awara awaara.

The next in the album comes Suresh Wadkar’s solo Tere Liye. The six minute song is definitely a piece of poetry more than a song. Quite typical, but anybody who listens to the song probably knows in advance what it’s gonna be and expects it to be precisely what it is. Humne to parindon se, baagon ke saude kiye, tere liye. Yes. It’s all Gulzar.

Dil dil hai dil dil hai dil hai dil, Suraj Jagan, and Rock. Well, Vishal Bhardwaj completely goes into Paanch mode with raw rock as he composes dil dil hai. I won’t say it’s similar to any song, but just reminds me that if an average composer can compose in N genres Vishal Bhardwaj can do it in N square.

Rekha’s Yeshu is definitely NOT what I was expecting it to be. A prayer, that somehow doesn’t sound that heartfelt, and somehow gets a bit boring too, but then the song sounds fine, and maybe even good for the times when you actually want to listen to it.

The next in the album is Doosri Darling, which comes up with the original darling, that is Kalinka-Kalinka-Malinka-Moya. In case you don’t yet know, the song Darling is based on a Russian folkish song of 1860s, Kalinka. Actually this is the one you have been listening to in the promos.

Overall, Vishal Bhardwaj is as good as ever in 7 Khoon Maaf, but then, a little disappointment comes from the fact that there is nothing as new as was there in Ishqiya, or even Kaminey. Still, there is quality, and this time, some quantity too.

Oh, did you notice there is no Sukhwinder Singh in a Vishal Bharadwaj album, after years?

Music Review – Soch Lo. Consider it.

I didn’t know any such movie existed, but when I started listening to the album, I was stuck on the first song I heard for some 5-6 times. And then, the whole album was a surprise for me. Here is a review.

Dedh inch Oopar is a song written, composed and sung by Charu Moohan who makes a debut here, and a very impressive one at that. The song is a slow, soft, very relaxing kind that makes you feel like you’re relaxing yourself on a beach. A must listen thing.
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Dabangg: Tracklist

Salman Khan’s Dabangg is again composed by Sajid-Wajid and this time they are back with a big league of singers comprising of Sukhwinder Singh, Rahat Fateh Ali Khan, Sonu Nigam and Shreya Ghoshal. Here is the song list of the movie. As per reports and common sense both, Tere Mast do nain is the one to watch out for.

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Krantiveer (new): Music Review (Sachin-Jigar)

Sachin-Jigar, the guys who gave some wonderful music in Satish kaushik’s Teree Sang, are back. This time the movie they have got looks even smaller and useless at the same time. But then, movies don’t always decide how the music would be, and so, there are some good things sachin-Jigar have come up with.

The album opens with Khuda mere Khuda, sung by KK and Shreya Ghoshal, which is definitely good, the best of the album, and can be easily found on the TV. Though I don’t guarantee you can watch the video. So my suggestion is, get the music alone, without visuals. A typical KK song. With good music and some little, interesting effects by composers Sachin-Jigar.
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Click: Music Review

Doorie….

Yup, Click starts exactly on the same note as Shamir Tandon’s first composition Rubaayi starts exactly like Atif’s Doorie even though it changes its path early. The song though is good, and all singers, especially Sunidhi sound well. Lyrics of the song are slightly better than average for a usual love song. Overall, other than Atif effect the opening song of Click is not bad.
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