Gangs of Wasseypur: Music Review (Sneha Khanwalkar, Piyush Mishra)

No, what’s there about this Anurag Kashyap guy, that every time he comes up with a movie, all these internet addicts, facebookers and twitterati people get up from graves and start writing praises everywhere they can. Why?

I myself am one of those net addicts, and even though I don’t exactly know the answer, it probably lies somewhere in the raw style he has, be it his films or their music. Yes, the man has used some nine composers in his nine directed movies, repeating just one of them, and coming out with different but wonderful music mostly.

This time, Anurag gets Dibakar Bannerjee’s regular composer, Sneha Khanwalkar to compose, as Dibakar goes for Vishal-Shekhar for his Shanghai, which comes in the same month.

And from here on, it’s not Anurag, but Sneha who is the point of interest. More because her music seems as raw as Anurag’s movies.

The first song of the album, Jiya ho Bihar ke lala, is the trend setter, theme setter for the movie. With those lovely beats and Manoj Tiwari, Sneha creates something really rare for the film industry, even though something of similar style should be very common on the streets of Bihar. The song, which is based on a para picked from a Nautanki in Gaya district, justifies the one month research Sneha seems to have done for the song, and Manoj Tiwari sounds like the most natural choice for the song. Full marks for this one.

Hunter, the second song of the album, is all experimental, with the music-melody normal, arrangements and voices used highly experimental, and lyrics quite double-meaning. If you get the lyrics, you’d enjoy the song a lot, else you might just like it for the experimental value.

Womaniya, however, is a simple song for the album. That said, don’t expect Shaan or Sonu Nigam to come up with a ‘dil churaya’ type song. This one is a very typical piece for all those hundred ceremonies (generally before and after weddings) where the elder ladies of the ‘mohalla’ take charge of the dholak and just sit down to share songs which are more jokes than songs. The best part of this one is that Sneha maintains the realness of the song completely with just a few added beats. And yes, if Varun Grover has written those lyrics all by himself, without help from a professional dadi-nani-aunty from the mohalla sangeets, he’s a sooper guy, to say the least.

..paataal mein ghus ja. Jisme ghusna hai ghus le, ghus meri jaan. Teri Keh ke Lunga. Okay, they are not the best words of the song, but they give you an idea of the song. The song, in iteslf, is a little dark, gives you a feel of the movie without even watching it, and you know it’d be running in the background in the xyz type of scenes. Sneha herself, is a little unusual for singer here, but with the words they sing and the way they sing them, the two are worth listening to.

Bhoos. Five minute and ten second song. And forty-five seconds of April fool. 🙂

Yes, the story is little like that only. The first 45 seconds into the song and one sings it’s a soul-stirring number from, say, Piyush Mishra, like that Sheher of Gulaal.. And then, Voila, there is a gentlemen-sangeet. A song that makes you feel like an idiot with its words, but I still love the words, because they are not really idiotic. Also the Nautanki-ish parts in the second half are lovely. One of my personal favorites on the album, probably because I’ve not really heard anything like that ever, despite its simplicity. Manish J Tipu (composer, Phas Gaye Re Obama) and Bhupesh Singh are the names on the cover.

Ik Bagal mein. I mean, there is nothing to say about the song other than it’s a TRADEMARK Piyush Mishra song. I suppose the song is written, composed, arranged, sung by Piyush Mishra only. The song is a masterpiece, and I can listen to it a hundred times. Especially towards the end the song is terrifyingly haunting and just superb, wonderful. The only complaint, it sounds so much like Duniya, despite some lovely sitar and overall difference in arrangements. Still, this one is what you must be looking for if you’re one into serious music.

Bhaiyya is a track which is again experimental, where a performance by Musahar of Sundarpur gets turned into something heavy, but the track is not so much of a success, majorly because you need to work too hard to get the words being sung.

Tain tain toon toon ti ti tee tee ta. Spoiler ahead. The spoiler is that the whole song has similar kind of lyrics, as if someone’s singing a self-made barahkhadi. You can seriously write your own lyrics for the music. Spoiler ends. And the music of the song is quite good.

Soona kar ke gharwa. I don’t know what I found in this simple dhol-manjeera song, but I just loved this one. There aren’t many words in the small song, and everything sounds real. I somehow feel like this is a simple recording from the Gaya Nautanki where Sneha found Jiya ho Bihar ke lala (I did hear jay ho Bihar ke lala in the background in this one). But no official word on this one.

Gareebi tod deti hai jo riste khaas hote hain, aur paraye apne hote hain, jab paise paas hote hain. And one more like that. But it’s the instrumental part after that that was the focus. Still, I didn’t get what really Sneha planned on providing here. Because if there was something played by the baal party, it’s more or less lost in the mixing. Not the favorite.

Womaniya, which comes as a remix-like version here (not called remix, the other version was ‘live’) is one of the highlights, and most probably will be a hit, or a superhit, depends on publicity. Do listen.

There is one song in this album that I don’t want to watch a video for. Manmauji, the song, is something I would have loved to listen on the radio in the afternoon sessions of my summer vacations with mom, without thinking if the song had a video at all. Seriously, my complaint is that the song is just two minutes and fifty-three seconds long. Sneha, wherever you are, if you’re listening, please, please, please create some more songs like that. Khula hai baajuband phata hai kaaj sambhal ke chalna hoga.

Loonga Loonga, a little too much of mixing-remixing. Skipping this one.

Humni ke chhodi ke nagariya e baba. This one from Deepak Kumar – Muzaffarpur is yet another very earthy number. In fact the song reminds me of some music that I have heard within my hometown, and in a very unimagined way, gives me a kind of peace. The only problem is that I don’t really get all the words in the song, hope that will be solved though.

So, the album is something to listen to, and the album is something all those who want to listen to ‘experimental’ music would love to have. Mind you, this album in itself is a complete season of Sound Trippin’ from Sneha. In fact the album tells me that music not always needs to be ‘composed’, you can ‘discover’ music and then produce it. Of course, that too needs a genius, but that would be a genius that would continuously learn, and it seems Sneha Khanwalkar is one such genius. More power to her.

And I hope you know by now why Anurag Kashyap is a guy talked about. No, producing a movie that features THIS music is not everyone’s kind of game. And then, that’s not all. The movie is yet to come. More power to him.

O ri Duniya.. #np

Jo Dooba So Paar, It’s Love in Bihar: Music Review

Of course, the movie is supposed to be interesting and so is the music in case of Jo Dooba So Paar, It’s Love in Bihar, if you have seen the promo even once. Here is a review of the album, composed by Manish J Tipu.

The album starts with Tochi Raina and Pia Sukanya’s Shiv ka baaje damru. The song, which is supposed to be romantic, has been added some linguistic elements which can make you laugh too, like ‘chanda bhi kankhi se dekhe tujhe, kudrat ka khela hai tu full too.’ The music and arrangements are simple but powerful and suit the settings of the movie.

The next song, Raghubir Yadav’s Andey garam garam is a satire with the basic tune of Andey garam garam going on that of Vande Mataram. The lyrics of the song, which are probably the most important thing here, are quite interesting, and in places quite thought-provoking. In short, even though this one is not as straightforward from the first line as Mehngai Dayan was, I’d say the song is bang on.

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