Shirin Farhad ki Toh Nikal Padi: Music Review (Jeet Ganguli)

Shirin Farhad ki To Nikal Padi Music ReviewJeet Ganguli has been in Bollywood on and off. But since Jeet-Pritam’s separation, he’s not been in the top rated movies. After a long time, he gets to compose for Shirin Farhad ki To Nikal Padi, which, depsite its irregular star cast, should be a big one. And Jeet plays his part right here. Here is a review.

Ishq mein tere bina dil hi na lage. The opening song of the album is a regular romantic number, with a lovely melody, and KK and Shreya singing. The song sounds a lot like those of 1990s-2000s, and sounds good, something that we are not getting to see a lot these days. Good singers, good composition and a nice romantic track. And still a little rare today, that’s what the song is.

The second song, Khatti Meethi, again maintains the melody quotient, while adding some nicer vocals from Shreya as she goes on to sing again. The other feature of the song is Amitabh Bhattacharya’s lyrics with lot of English words, but still keeping them from making the song anything other than natural. You get to hear ‘mausamon mein feel hai’ instead of ‘mausamon mein ehsaas hai’, something a person is more likely to say today. This may be start of something new.

The sad part is that Urdu is leaving us, and English is coming in, but then that’s exactly what is happening in our daily lives and the good part is that the song does it without going overboard. I’d say, good work by Amitabh here.

The next song of the album, Kaafir Andhere, is a treat for music lovers. The song is a love ballad, sad, a little rocky, and sung perfectly by KK. The lyrics of the song are good, as one can expect from Amitabh. The only negative, the song seems to have a hangover of ‘Jaane kyun tanha ho gaye’ of Bhram. Other than that, it’s just lovely.

And yeah, this one kind of makes up for the loss of Urdu out there.

Shirin Farhad ki Toh Nikal Padi. I love this title song. For two reasons. One, this gives something different to the album, something that is prevalent in the market today, and Jeet does it nothing less than Pritam or say, Sohail. And two, I love the simple, very slightly philosophical, but feel-good lyrics. OK, maybe I said a bit too much for the lyrics, but the song is nice. And makes me feel I should watch the movie. Me.

Guitars. Kuku duku. Again a little hangover’ish from here n there, but the sounds are nice, and until Mohit Chauhan enters with the strange, monologue’ish, ’90s type lyrics, you expect a nice romantic number. The good part is even with the comic-romantic lyrics, you like the song, just that it’s not a blockbuster. But nice. Especially for the movie.

Ramba mein Samba by Usha Uthhup has got some nice music, or I should say interesting music, as there were many other songs that fit the words ‘nice’ better. But the fusion of Electronic, Dhol and Spanish background vocals is something that gives a good feel. I like.

Overall, SFKTNP is an album with a lot of melody, something we don’t get a lot nowadays, some good lyrics, with some regular, nice tracks, and a little experimentation and some light comedy thrown in. I don’t think I could have asked for lot more flavors here. Welcome back, Jeet.

Ek Tha Tiger Music Review (Sohail Sen, Sajid-Wajid)

Should I start with Mashallah? Well, I think there is enough said about the song, and then everyone seems to have heard it, so let’s just say the song is probably going to be the weaker part of the album. Or maybe I can say the weakest, if Salman Bhai’s fans allow me to. Not because he’s wrong anywhere, cuz Sajid-Wajid HAVE given some good songs for him. How can I ever forget the small preview of Tere Mast Mast Do Nain I heard at IIFA. That number within seconds told us what a hit it was going to be. But then, this time they seem to have got it wrong. Not too wrong, but not as right as it has been earlier.

And I wrote again so much about that song. OK, leave that one. Let’s see others.

Sohail Sen’s part of the album begins with a KK song and the duo seem to maintain the rapport shared in their last album, Mere Brother ki Dulhan. KK here again plays the fast track, and sings a full fledged commercial number for Salman, this time with Shreya Ghoshal Palak Muchchal. The song, though not extraordinary as such, has a nice melody and the ‘main laapata‘ part is catchy as well. So be ready to hear many fans singing this one, and in due time, some non-fans too.

The next song of the album, Banjaara, is sung by Sukhwinder Singh. And will definitely be pictured on Salman Khan. That actually tells you a lot about the song. Let me spell it out a little more clearly. The song is full of energy, so much so that without even watching it, one can see Salman Khan dancing to the tune with full energy. This one is a hit.

Teri Meri Meri Teri Prem Kahani hai Naadan Parindey. Saiyyara Main Saiyaara. OK leave the name. Let’s just say there is a sad song sung by Mohit Chauhan for Salman Khan. Can there be a thing deadlier than this as of today? OK I may again be overselling it, but I would at least say that Saiyaara is the best song of the album. The song has a superb melody, touching lyrics, the singers are superb, be it Mohit or Tarannum Malik, and so is the singing. The orchestration is simple and beautiful. One cannot doubt about the presence of Salman Khan in the song. Basically there isn’t a thing that would leave me in doubt about the song, it just is going to be one of the best this year. The only minor hitch is that the lyrics of the song make me feel that the movie ‘may’ have a sad ending. Hope that isn’t the case. I want the Tiger to remain there.

And yeah, the Tiger Theme is something you have already heard a lot since the very first teaser trailer, most of it. So that one already makes a fan nostalgic, which is a little strange, but quite positive for the movie. Other than the heard part too, the theme has quite some shades and should work perfectly in the background, and once you have seen the movie, on the CD too.

So clearly, this Tiger is going to rock. As per the rumors, Salman may not be too happy about Sohail doing the score for the movie, but the result has come out really well, and Sajid-Wajid’s song turns out the not-so-good piece of the album. As for Sohail’s part, I’d just say, Mashallah.

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Lanka: Music Review (Toshi-Sharib, Gaurav Dagaonkar, Rishabh)

I wanted to write a review for Lanka since I heard it for the first time, say a week ago at least, but somehow couldn’t do it yet. Finally writing it now.

The album starts with Iltija, Rishabh Srivastava’s song from his debut album Iltija. The song on the Bhatt pattern is an okay composition and sung okay too, making an okay though a little unevenly spaced start.

The next song Aap ki Aahat, composed by Toshi-Sharib sounds like the beginning of Bhatt-camp-song again as the beginning seconds remind me of aye kaash, kash yoon hota, but then the young Sabri brothers get into a different mood as they compose a slower tune for Sonu Nigam to sing, with some interesting lyrics as well. Nice one, something that Sonu Nigam sounds nice singing.

Sheet Lahar, composed by Gaurav and sung by Shreya, is a slow, nice composition with simple lyrics. The slow pace of the song may not appeal to all and definitely not one for ‘quick listening’ but if you give it time, lyrics as well Shreya’s singing would appeal to you. Nice job by Gaurav Dagaonkar.

The next song is again by Gaurav Dagaonkar, and is my favorite from the movie. Yup, it’s KK singing, where the irritation claimed by the lyrics can almost be heard in his voice. Barham hain hum is something to listen to, definitely.

Qubool, the next, is a regular Toshi-Sharib song, sung by Toshi, but then the song has an added dose of good lyrics, that too in prayer to god, making the song nicer to listen. Liked.

Sheet Leher comes in a different version, this time sung by Tia Bajpai, and sounds okay.

The last one from the album, Sunidhi Chauhan’s Hai Rama Rama, composed by Toshi-Sharib, doesn’t seem to be any purpose more than being yet another item number in the movie.

Overall, however, the album is good, with Gaurav Dagaonkar giving some good numbers while Toshi-Sharib give more or less their average, which is good, to say the least. Do listen to the album especially for Sonu, Shreya, n KK’s songs.

Jo Hum Chahein: Music Review (Sachin Gupta)

Sachin Gupta, the man behind Ehsaan itna sa kar de and Prince, is here again, with his new album, Jo Hum Chahein. Here is a review of the album.

The album starts with Aaj bhi Party sung by Suraj Jagan, which impresses with its sound from the very beginning. Yet another party song, Aaj bhi party is based on a nice tune and the sound of the song has been well worked on. Suraj Jagan once again does well.

The second song of the album, Ishq hothon se to hota nahi bayaan is a nice surprise from KK and Shreya Ghoshal, that goes a little in the ‘Ehsaan’ way, without the high notes. I mean, the song is a really soulful number with lovely lyrics and soft music on a nice melody, but the background has some rock’ish effects here and there. Well fused. Do listen.

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Ye Stupid Pyaar: Music Review (Vipin Patwa)

The album begins with Nikhil D’Souza’s Lamha Lamha, and though the song doesn’t seem to be one for a long life, Nikhil’s voice is nice and the music and lyrics are average, making the song an okay one.

Second song in a row begins in such a way that you are bound to think if the composer is some old follower of Pritam. Anyway, KK sings the simple tune of Tere naam se in his lovely voice, almost reminding me of hothon se chhoo lo tum, mera geet amar kar do. I mean, I wonder how many songs have risen in standard simply because of the voice and the way of singing of KK. Not an exceptionally good track, but you’d most probably like to listen to it.
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My Friend Pinto: Music Review (Ajay-Atul et al.)

Dhinchak Zindagi didn’t sound so dhinchak to me even with its not bad melody, probably because of its arrangements, and Kunal sounds a bit too enthusiastic here, but then that probably goes with the song. Overall fine, but not too great.

The next, do kabootar gets some reduction in noise levels, and even though it’s Kunal again, the song and the singing are both better. Even though the song is nice, if you listen to the lyrics, they seem worthy of a little more serious tune. Not bad still. Like it.
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Force (2011): Music Review (Harris Jayaraj, Lalit Pandit)

Harris Jayaraj is here.

After Kakka Kakka and Gharshana, the song that is Khwabon Khwabon here, is as good as it was back in 2003 and 2004. Yes, it has the potential to be a rage here as well, especially with the Gibberish Suchitra is performing for the third time. Do listen.

The next, Chahoon bhi is nothing less than awesome. Bombay Jaishree sings the gem with her usual superbness, but when Karthik enters the song, the quality goes only up. A superb, lovely, slow, must-listen number. Hats off to Harris Jayaraj. As far as I know, it’s a new composition by him. Let me know if I am wrong there.

Dum hai to Aaja, composed by Lalit Pandit and sung by Mahua Kamat, is a simple tune with not-too-hard rock style. Lalit Pandit is not too great with his music, nor are the lyrics too great. Mahua could be better, and the same goes for the song.

Main Chali, again a composition of Harris, clearly states his re-entry in the album within seconds. The song sung by Naresh Iyer and Shreya singing reminds me of the earlier days of Rahman, or to some extent Ghajini in its arrangement. Totally worth a try, especially for the variety of music he has put in one song. And yes, it is Shreya Ghoshal only, a little difficult to believe at some points, even though she sings in her typical style.

For the last song again, you don’t need the album’s cover to decide who has composed this one. Harris this time brings in Vijay Prakash, Shalini Singh and Neha Bhasin for Dil ki hai Tamanna. The music is light and simple, with basic, light arrangements, while vocals take priority once again, and Vijay Prakash just amazes with his voice. Neha Bhasin’s voice is well used too.

Overall, Force is awesomeness from Harris. The only thing I am wondering about is why the producers asked Lalit for a song. With this kind of music, even Munni would not fit well.

If you’re one for quality music, Go. Buy.

Mere Brother ki Dulhan: Music Review (Sohail Sen)

Sohail Sen for the first time gets something worthwhile outside Ashutosh Gowariker’s camp, and he looks keen on making it big. Here is a review of his entry into YRF, Mere Brother ki Dulhan.

The album starts with the title song Mere Brother ki Dulhan, a fast paced, quickly addictive, likable number with some interesting lyrics from Irshad Kaamil sung by KK.

I was still in the first song when a chorus broke into some rocky words and Neha Bhasin into Dhunki Dhunki Dhunki laage. While the music is lovely, it’s Neha who surprises me with her lovely singing here. She’s been good in some Salim-Sulaiman songs earlier, in Fashion, as well as Pyaar Impossible, but this could be the song that would restate her entry into Hindi film industry.

The next song Chhoo Mantar is, I would say, a typical Sohail Sen piece, with his signature beats, and if I didn’t know it from the cover, I’d say is sung by him as well. Yes, it’s bad how I still don’t get Benny Dayal’s voice after so many of his songs that I completely love. Aditi Singh Sharma is as soft and husky with her voice here as she always is.

Isq Risk, the next song, sung by Rahat Fateh Ali Khan, gives a little small surprise in the beginning as you hear a radio (read AIR) style prologue to the song, telling whose music and words the song has. Sohail Sen’s melody is a bit ’90s in its treatment, but with Rahat singing, the song sounds pretty nice. Irshad Kamil’s words are lovely here.

Ali Zafar’s only entry in the soundtrack, Madhubala is simply enjoyable. I don’t think I want to use any other word for the song. It’s his signature ‘Masti’ that literally shows up here, nicely supported by Shweta Pandit.

Shahid Mallya, another name that is a bit new for me, is growing up quite fast nowadays. After Naina wali Whiskey in Sahi Dhandhe Galat Bande and with Mausam lined up for him, it’s the third place I have seen his name in this week, for Do Dhaari Talwar here. The song, with a little Punjabi flavor in it, mostly because of Shahid’s singing style and percussion based arrangements, is quite fast paced and enjoyable, though doesn’t look like very long lasting.

Overall, MBKD is a typical Yashraj album with songs that will be liked instantly by the public. Be it the title song or Dhunki, Isq risk or Madhubala, the composer is quite clear on what he wants the song to do and I feel that it would be a big plus for the movie. Go buy it if you like typical hit soundtracks of Bollywood.

PS: One interesting thing about the album is that even though Yashraj use a new composer here, many of the singers are the ones who have sung a lot for YRF, with their regular composers Salim-Sulaiman, especially Benny Dayal, Neha Bhasin and Shweta Pandit.

I am Kalam: Music Review (Abhishek, Madhuparna, Papon, Shivji, Susmit)

Abhishek Ray’s composition for the words chaand taare jeb mein hain is well sung by KK and makes a nice listen. The next, Shreya’s Chini bhini, again composed by Abhishek, has lyrics bubbling with enthusiasm and Shreya is kind of surprising in this one as she sings the song in a little intoxicated voice. The combination of lyrics and music here is not really what one would expect seeing the lyrics, but it sounds nice the way it is.
Madhuparna composed Rang Jamale reminds me of Chak de the way it starts, but then the song has only a touch from there, more in the terms of arrangements than composition. The composition seems to have more touches from here and there, but does sound fine and Javed fits well here. The female version of the song, sung by Anushka Manchanda, is a little different from her regular more-English-than-Hindi songs and she sounds different, and nice. One good part is that Anushka doesn’t let the instruments overpower her voice here.

Papon’s self composed (probably his first in Bollywood) Zindagi aisi waisi is quite lovely and makes Papon sound promising once again, this time as a composer as well. I had already loved him in Jiyein Kyun, but this time he sounded more serious. Protique Mojoomdar’s positive lyrics are definitely a plus.

Susmit Bose and Shivji Dholi’s Jeevan ek rangoli hai is more of a live thing and the folk’ish number sounds different, like it’s recorded out of the recording rooms, like old songs. But the lyrics of the song are good and the song gives a ‘real’ feel.

Udan pe baitho kaaga bole is another small, real sounding track from Shivji Dholi which is almost unplugged with just a harmonium to support him.

The last track, children’s version of chaand taare jeb mein hain is an okay one. The version reminds me of Chillar Party where Amit Trivedi had got some children to sing in a wonderful manner, but here there is nothing like that and children just make a good chorus, like it happened in old movies during one time. Not bad.

Overall, I am Kalam is a good album with assorted composers. Interestingly the album doesn’t have usual run of the mill songs and also the lyrics of almost all the songs are good, irrespective of who they have been written or sung by. I hope the movie is equally good.

Buy I am Kalam Audio CD Here.

Always Kabhi Kabhi: Music Review (Pritam, Aashish, Shree D)

The album starts with Aashish Rego and Shree D’s only composition for the album, which happens to be the title track of the album. The song, sung by Bhavin Dhanak, Sanah Moidutty and Apeksha Dandekar, is a usual, funky-colleg-y number that is full of nice beats, but the less than four minutes’ track takes a lovely turn when a Sufiana voice enters the song almost a minute before the end of the song. Still don’t know which of the singers it is, but completely loved the entry, especially the way it happens there. Shame that the voice doesn’t sing much.

From the second song onwards, it gets Pritam. Antenna sounds a lot like some song from Ready, probably the sound matches character dheela hai. Also, the lyrics are written by Amitabh Bhattacharya, but didn’t like the concept of the song itself. Still, the sound of the song IS catchy and can catch up well with some good promotion.
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Coke Studio India. June 17th. 7 PM. MTV.

Coke Studio is finally in India. And while there may be questions about the credibility of the show and comparisons to its much older Pakistani counterpart, I am quite hopeful and almost sure that this will be a wonderful experience for us.

For now, here is some detail about the show, mostly about who all are gonna be there on the show.

The show will have twenty artistes. While the top Bollywood line of the show comprises of Shankar Mahadevan, Shaan, KK and Sunidhi Chauhan, we’ll also see Kailash Kher, Richa Sharma, Shruti Pathak, and Benny Dayal from Bollywood singers.

Besides, there will be Raghu Dixit, or should I say The Raghu Dixit Project, the well known name from Bangalore; once so popular Colonial Cousins – Hariharan and Leslie Lewis; comparatively lesser known Bollywood singers Harshdeep Kaur and Akriti Kakkar (Harshdeep is winner of two television reality shows and has even sung for A R Rahman in Rang De Basanti, Akriti has almost twenty movies to her credit where she has sung); and the singer of mora saiyyan, aankhon kay sagar, mitwa, and many more, Shafqat Amanat Ali Khan.

Then there are Sabri Brothers*, Aftab and Hashim Sabri, qawwali singers who have sung for Hindi films as well, my best memory being of Allah Allah from Yeh Dil Ashiqana (no idea how crappy the movie was but the songs were good, the qawwali being one of the best) and Tumse mil ke dil ka hai jo haal from Main hoon na.

Also the show will have Sufi singers Puranchand and Pyarelal Wadali i.e. Wadali Brothers there too. The pair has also sung a couple of songs for Bollywood, the latest being Rangrez in Tanu weds Manu.

In lesser known singers, which could and should make the real life of the show, there will be Assamese Bihu specialist Khagen Gogoi, Tamilnadu’s once-a-singer-at-thirteen Chinna Ponnu, another Assamese Mausam Gogoi, maker of boatmen band Majhi Mallah Saurav Mandal and New Delhi’s eclectic music group Advaita.

What is still a confusion though, is that while the list above is given on the ‘Artists’ page of the Coke Studio website, there is another sentence that says ‘The collaborations are so eclectic as to bring together Shafqat Ali and Shruti Pathak, Sunidhi Chauhan and Wadali Brothers, Kailash Kher and Papon, Shankar Mahadevan and Khogen Da, and Bombay Jayshree, Richa Sharma and Rashid Khan among others‘ while going by the list, I won’t find Papon, Bombay Jayshree and Rashid Khan on the show.

* My guess is that there is some mix up regarding them on the Coke Studio’s official website, they claim that Sabri Brothers are a Pakistani Qawwali party.

Haunted – 3D: Music Review (Chirantan Bhatt)

The album starts with KK singing Tum ho mera pyaar which for once gives you an illusion that it’s a Nadeem Shravan song with its beats and by the time I was finished with the song, I was remembering the days when Pritam used to get KK for one hit song in almost every movie, especially around Gangster. Nice and nostalgic.

The next, Jaaniya, by Siddharth Basrur, is a lovely ballad with some captivating beats. May not sound too good immediately after a rocking Tum ho mera pyaar, but a wonderful song with its own identity, nonetheless.

The next song, tera hi hona chahoon, brings in Jojo with Najam Sheraz. The song that interestingly starts with a Tabla, later turns into almost full-fledged rock number. And I’d say kudos to Chirantan for pulling that off quite well. Third song in a row that is not bad, at the least.

Next comes Mujhe de de har gham tera, which is a sad song by its lyrics but sounds soothing by its music. Interestingly (for me at least), the combination generally makes a great, at least quite good song, in longer term. And I am liking the song already. Good, but takes time, as I said.

The next name is of Nikhil D’Souza, who comes up to sing You’re so beautiful, an expectably romantic, and not-so-expectably Hindi song, in his own typical style (yeah, he has one) which gives the album a little more variety, something the album kinda lacks even with such beautiful songs.

The end of album comes with the actress Tia Bajpai singing a song called Sau Baras, and quite admirably, she sounds good even with very few instruments playing in the background. The song is more like poetry, at least the first half of it. Nice, kinda gives the album it’s only song with a female as Tum ho mera pyaar hardly gives Suzi a chance.

So overall Haunted – 3D is a ‘not bad at all’ album which one would like to listen to even though it doesn’t have much new to offer. Probably because it takes you back to those days that you haven’t probably realized have passed, or maybe simply because of its good, if not ‘very’ good, quality. Wait, was that last sentence too philosophical for a review?

I am. Music Review.

Amit Trivedi. 3/6. Vivek Philip. 1/6. Rajiv Bhalla. 2/6. And a good album. Onir does it quite well it seems. A review.

The album starts with Amit Trivedi’s Baangur, sung by Mame Khan and Kavita Seth. The song has that typical Amit Trivedi beat in the background but even though the album bears Amit’s signature, it is completely worth listening to. While Mame sounds a bit like Mohan only, Kavita makes things interesting for sure. A good combination of singers and music.

When the second song Isi baat pe starts, for once you may feel it’s the first song going to be repeated, but then in comes probably the first big name of an Amit Trivedi composition, KK. But somehow, since the song has the same background as Bangur, it doesn’t leave so much of an effect. A good song, nonetheless.

The next song Bojhal se, is sung by KK again, but is a composition of Rajiv Bhalla. The song is definitely one for KK though as there is very minimal music in the background and the whole ballad is lifted by KK alone. The lyrics are wonderful and all I want to say is, listen to it when u are at leisure, and you’d love it.

The next, Aankhein, is a Vivek Philip composition, and sounds like one. The song seems to follow the same style composition as in Jalte hain of Sorry Bhai. A soft, romantic, slow, but beat based song that will probably be liked the very first time you listen to it. And then, some really wonderful singing by Karthik. Do try.

In his next song, Saye Saye, Amit Trivedi gets a bit experimental and keeps Rekha Bharadwaj and Mohan singing kind of separately from the background beats. My guess is that the song is gonna be loved much by people in due time. Sounds like a slow addiction to me. Do listen to this one as well.

The last song Wandu yerudu (means one two), composed by Rajiv Bhalla, has some Hindi/Punjabi/Telugu words, in fact for the first half minute, one may think the song is Telugu only, after which Punjabi words start appearing. Not a great composition and definitely nothing like the other songs of the album. Probably an addition to the album for those who wanted a dance number, but I wonder how much it’ll work.

Anyway, overall the album is great and out of the six original tracks, five are definitely worth a listen, while Bangur and Aankhein are something to be loved. And then, Saye Saye can be the big surprise. Lovely album.

Game (2011) Music Review – Shankar Ehsaan Loy

I can sum up the album in one sentence. It’s not upto the name of Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy.

The album starts with Vishal Dadlani’s It’s a game. While the song is not an instant thing, Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy’s arrangements with a hangover of Karthik Calling Karthik make Vishal’s good singing work to some extent. You may like it if you pay some attention.

The reprise version sung by Sunitha Sarath seems dull, probably because the voice lacks the life that Vishal has in his voice.

Kaun hai Ajnabi
has some lovely vocals by KK and Aditi Singh Sharma, but the song sounds more of a Pritam number than SEL’s. Not bad, though nothing great. Interestingly, the remix of the song works equally good.

Maine ye kab socha tha is a different side of the album where Shaan comes up to sing a romantic number with Anusha Mani, supported by Loy and almost a chorus, something like in We are Family. Though the song is quite good in parts, it doesn’t really sound like one song in whole and that may be a reason for its failure.

The last original number, Mehki Mehki, sung by Shreya Ghoshal and Kshitij, is a different sound and almost enters the territory of A R Rahman. At some points I just felt like I have heard the song, but it was probably just the ambiance and hence I couldn’t point towards any song. With a slight touch of old Bollywood songs of maybe ’70s and all these new mentioned things, Mehki Mehki is definitely something worth a try. Listen to it and probably you will fall for it in due time.

As for the remix of Mehki Mehki, it’s not bad, but the song loses the beautiful arrangements that existed in the original version and made the soul of the song, so nothing much to listen to here.

Overall, Game is an okay album but if you’re thinking of buying the album just because you know Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy and you know their standard, you may be in for a little disappointment.

7 Khoon Maaf: Music Review: Saat Khoon Maaf

Vishal Bhardwaj is here again.

Well, Darling, the Russian connection of Vishal Bhardwaj is definitely a well composed, well sung piece and similarities as well as differences from Kalinka are quite beautifully done. While Vishal gets the music catchy and haunting, Rekha Bharadwaj sings the song once again with a new touch to her voice. But the voice that gets it the best there is that of Usha Uthup. Kudos to Vishal for using her voice with such precision. The last word on the song: Daaaarrrrrling…

Bekaraan hain bekaraan, aankhein band keeje na, doobne lage hain hum, saans lene deeje na. Well, if I tell you that the song is sung by Vishal Bhardwaj, you’d probably be able to even guess the tune. I mean, so very predictable, and predictably lovely and beautiful too.

Vishal Bhardwaj is back. From the days of Paanch. Yeah, Vishal gets KK back after years, and for something similar. KK rocks in this one, and though Vishal rocks, the slight negative is that like other songs of the album, you have something to compare with it already. This time I was thinking about Sar jhuka khuda hoon main while listening to the song. But then, khuda hoon main didn’t have Gulzar. The lines here are just awesome in some places. Like Gulzar. After all, he can rock too.

Awaara Awaara Awaara. Master Salim sings this one for Vishal and comes up with one of the best things of the album. The music, the words, and the depth in Saleem’s voice go along, making it an experience worth experiencing. Interestingly while the song reminds me of albela sajan ghar aayo re, it also reminds me of Naina and Rahat Fateh Ali Khan. And the greatness of the two songs is proof enough to how good the song would be. Na shaakh jude, na jad pakde, mausam mausam banjara.. aawara awara awaara.

The next in the album comes Suresh Wadkar’s solo Tere Liye. The six minute song is definitely a piece of poetry more than a song. Quite typical, but anybody who listens to the song probably knows in advance what it’s gonna be and expects it to be precisely what it is. Humne to parindon se, baagon ke saude kiye, tere liye. Yes. It’s all Gulzar.

Dil dil hai dil dil hai dil hai dil, Suraj Jagan, and Rock. Well, Vishal Bhardwaj completely goes into Paanch mode with raw rock as he composes dil dil hai. I won’t say it’s similar to any song, but just reminds me that if an average composer can compose in N genres Vishal Bhardwaj can do it in N square.

Rekha’s Yeshu is definitely NOT what I was expecting it to be. A prayer, that somehow doesn’t sound that heartfelt, and somehow gets a bit boring too, but then the song sounds fine, and maybe even good for the times when you actually want to listen to it.

The next in the album is Doosri Darling, which comes up with the original darling, that is Kalinka-Kalinka-Malinka-Moya. In case you don’t yet know, the song Darling is based on a Russian folkish song of 1860s, Kalinka. Actually this is the one you have been listening to in the promos.

Overall, Vishal Bhardwaj is as good as ever in 7 Khoon Maaf, but then, a little disappointment comes from the fact that there is nothing as new as was there in Ishqiya, or even Kaminey. Still, there is quality, and this time, some quantity too.

Oh, did you notice there is no Sukhwinder Singh in a Vishal Bharadwaj album, after years?