Dabangg 2: Music Review [Sajid-Wajid]

Dabangg 2 seems to be beginning where Dabangg ended. Don’t know how much of Abhinav Kashyap’s magic is going to be there with Arbaaz, but at least music seems to tell you very clearly that it’s nothing other than Dabangg 2.

Dagabaaz re, the first song of the album is almost an extension of Tere mast mast do nain, though doesn’t go that high on notes. However, the combination of Salman, Sajid-Wajid and Rahat, and even Shreya, keeps things a lot in Dabangg mood. Lyrics are simple, nice, and in the mood with the music. It’s not mast-mast do nain, but the song is an okay sequel to the superhit track.

Jo Dooba So Paar, It’s Love in Bihar: Music Review

Of course, the movie is supposed to be interesting and so is the music in case of Jo Dooba So Paar, It’s Love in Bihar, if you have seen the promo even once. Here is a review of the album, composed by Manish J Tipu.

The album starts with Tochi Raina and Pia Sukanya’s Shiv ka baaje damru. The song, which is supposed to be romantic, has been added some linguistic elements which can make you laugh too, like ‘chanda bhi kankhi se dekhe tujhe, kudrat ka khela hai tu full too.’ The music and arrangements are simple but powerful and suit the settings of the movie.

The next song, Raghubir Yadav’s Andey garam garam is a satire with the basic tune of Andey garam garam going on that of Vande Mataram. The lyrics of the song, which are probably the most important thing here, are quite interesting, and in places quite thought-provoking. In short, even though this one is not as straightforward from the first line as Mehngai Dayan was, I’d say the song is bang on.

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Delhi Belly: Music Review (Ram Sampath)

Delhi Belly starts with Bhaag Bhaag DK Bose DK Bose DK Bhaag. And you must by now know how well the song is ‘running.’ LOVE this one. Nothing more to say. Can just praise Amitabh Bhattacharya and Ram Sampath for the masterpiece of its own kind they have created.

If you thought Bhaag Bhaag DK Bose was going to be the only highlight of Delhi Belly, you might be in for a surprise. The second song, Nakkadwaley Disco Udhaarwale Khisko is not on very different lines, though it doesn’t create such punny situations as the earlier one. Still, teri tirchhi nazar ne dil ko kar diya pancher is some really innovative use of Kirti Sagathia’s voice. And so is the song. Innovative, only two steps behind Emosanal Attyachar.

The next number, Saigal Blues, sung by Chetan Shashital, is almost clear by its name. The song is almost a clear cut copy of KL Saigal’s singing, with some twist, that will make the song run longer in this age.

The next song of the album is finally a little less into fun though it’s not all serious. Ram Sampath gets an item-ish Bedardi Raja for his wife, Sona Mahapatra. Okay composition, well sung.

The next number again has a name that would get people interested. Suraj Jagan sings this slightly espionage-y, very rocky Ja Chudail. Suraj almost does a Zehreelay Zehreelay with Chudail, but with the lyrics it has, the song is bound to be funny. I smell Dev.D to some extent, but not exactly in that way.

Ram Sampath comes up to sing the next normal and probably the first and only romantic number of the album, Tere Siva, with Tarannum Malik. The song has a slight ’90s touch though the song is very likable and lovely, something that has been seen in some other Ram Sampath songs too, I feel. Well composed, well sung, with a nice end.

Switty Switty Switty tera pyaar chahida. Sung by Kirti Sagathia. The song might not sound completely new as one can find some similar sounding songs before, in pieces, but the song as Ram and Kirti have made it is a bit different. A completely ‘Delhi’ sounding song, it has Sufi’ish touches (NO, this is NOT a Sufi song), a-very-Punjabi-mixed-Delhi’ish language, and that will (read chipku’ish-ness). The song should work well with this movie, though I’d see no future for this one in a normal movie I guess.

The next song, tere pyaar ne kar diya deewana/ I hate you like I love you is a beautifully confused song. The song starts in a good qawwali mood and shifts to almost a cheerleader song (rock n roll?). But the mixing is well done and in a way that it only makes the song interesting. Kudos to Ram Sampath for the composition and even Amitabh for writing this one.

And then, if the original tracks weren’t enough, there is a ‘punk’ version of Switty, sung by Kirti and Ram Sampath himself, though I liked the original more, as that one had taken me by more surprise.

Overall, Delhi Belly is what you had wanted it to be after that first trailer and that first song. There is still nothing better in the album, nor the album is what you’d say ‘musical,’ but then still for the album I’d say Go get it. Or in other words, bhaag bhaag!

Shaitan: Music Review (Prashant Pillai, Ranjit Barot & others)

The opening ‘Baali‘ starts in a slightly Raavan’ish way, but the music turns such that you feel it’s all new. The music is quite techno and even gets telugu’ish in between. But the sounds are definitely used well. I suppose this one will fit people’s minds as what they are calling it, the Sound of Shaitan. Nice.

The next, Nasha, sung by composer Prashant Pillai along with Bindu Nambiar is again on the same track and continues the hazy effect that was present in the first one. But then this one has some singing as well and sounds comparatively more normal. I’m not sure how this hazy effect will sound in longer term but for now it sounds pretty interesting. Guess will sound good in longer run too.
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