Ek Tha Tiger Music Review (Sohail Sen, Sajid-Wajid)

Should I start with Mashallah? Well, I think there is enough said about the song, and then everyone seems to have heard it, so let’s just say the song is probably going to be the weaker part of the album. Or maybe I can say the weakest, if Salman Bhai’s fans allow me to. Not because he’s wrong anywhere, cuz Sajid-Wajid HAVE given some good songs for him. How can I ever forget the small preview of Tere Mast Mast Do Nain I heard at IIFA. That number within seconds told us what a hit it was going to be. But then, this time they seem to have got it wrong. Not too wrong, but not as right as it has been earlier.

And I wrote again so much about that song. OK, leave that one. Let’s see others.

Sohail Sen’s part of the album begins with a KK song and the duo seem to maintain the rapport shared in their last album, Mere Brother ki Dulhan. KK here again plays the fast track, and sings a full fledged commercial number for Salman, this time with Shreya Ghoshal Palak Muchchal. The song, though not extraordinary as such, has a nice melody and the ‘main laapata‘ part is catchy as well. So be ready to hear many fans singing this one, and in due time, some non-fans too.

The next song of the album, Banjaara, is sung by Sukhwinder Singh. And will definitely be pictured on Salman Khan. That actually tells you a lot about the song. Let me spell it out a little more clearly. The song is full of energy, so much so that without even watching it, one can see Salman Khan dancing to the tune with full energy. This one is a hit.

Teri Meri Meri Teri Prem Kahani hai Naadan Parindey. Saiyyara Main Saiyaara. OK leave the name. Let’s just say there is a sad song sung by Mohit Chauhan for Salman Khan. Can there be a thing deadlier than this as of today? OK I may again be overselling it, but I would at least say that Saiyaara is the best song of the album. The song has a superb melody, touching lyrics, the singers are superb, be it Mohit or Tarannum Malik, and so is the singing. The orchestration is simple and beautiful. One cannot doubt about the presence of Salman Khan in the song. Basically there isn’t a thing that would leave me in doubt about the song, it just is going to be one of the best this year. The only minor hitch is that the lyrics of the song make me feel that the movie ‘may’ have a sad ending. Hope that isn’t the case. I want the Tiger to remain there.

And yeah, the Tiger Theme is something you have already heard a lot since the very first teaser trailer, most of it. So that one already makes a fan nostalgic, which is a little strange, but quite positive for the movie. Other than the heard part too, the theme has quite some shades and should work perfectly in the background, and once you have seen the movie, on the CD too.

So clearly, this Tiger is going to rock. As per the rumors, Salman may not be too happy about Sohail doing the score for the movie, but the result has come out really well, and Sajid-Wajid’s song turns out the not-so-good piece of the album. As for Sohail’s part, I’d just say, Mashallah.

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Tees Maar Khan: Music Review

Tees Maar Khan comes as a relief. The relied that Vishal-Shekhar finally create something that is not the same as I Hate Love Storys and Break ke Baad. As for what it IS, the music comes as some Masala music for the masala film Tees Maar Khan is going to be.

The album starts with a very Characteristic title song that very much identifies itself with the movie, as the movie is supposed to be on a person who steals money from biggies, something similar happens with the song, which copies music from here and there and just puts it here. Quite a bogus thing from Shirish Kunder, where the only thing worth knowing is that Sonu Nigam is all the voices in the song.

Now, Vishal-Shekhar come into the picture, or Sound, to be more precise. The first song is Sheila ki Jawani, sung by Sunidhi Chauhan and supported by Vishal Dadlani. Now the song is not a typical item number with all desi moves as the title may suggest, but it’s an item number with a fake-spohisticated touch, but sounds fine as the fakeness is deliberate. The good thing is that Vishal-Shekhar know what they are doing. Vishal sounds good in his few lines. Okay as of now, should be very likeable in the video.

Wallah re Wallah, which also features Saregemapa’s Kamal Khan among its many singers, is a highlight of the album. A qawwali with some okay lyrics and well-made music is worth listening to. In fact for keeping the qawwali sound good even with all those added beats should have been something not really easy for the composers. Good work there. Makes for a good listen and I guess would make a perfect thing with a jazzy video showing Salman Khan. The wallah wallah part can prove addictive while the rest of the song goes good on melody. Expect the song to be a rage if the video comes out good. Should be.

Badey Dilwala, the next, is a Dabangg Omkara thing with an added comic mood, trying to make things sound a bit different from the two songs and kind of succeeding. But then Sukhwinder Singh singing the song again makes you think about Dabangg and Omkara, can’t help it. Sukhwinder though sounds more like in a Dil-haara form. Some very interesting lyrics add to the interest and popularity quotients of the song.

The fifth n last song of the album, fourth by V-S, is Happy Ending, a song with some beautiful chorus and some lovely plus slightly comic lyrics. The best part of the lyrics is the honesty of them and Vishal-Shekhar somehow are really good at sounding honest, right from the time they created Tu Ashiqui Hai, not comparing the two songs at all, at the same time. The song starts with something that gives you a feel you’re going to get a ‘chaand taare tod laaun (Yes Boss)’ and then moves on to get you something more comic than what you probably, still not disappointing. Also, with Prajakta Shukre, Harshit Saxena, Abhijeet Sawant and Debojit singing the song, I somehow got an Indian Idol feel in the song, but I cannot say if that was just a figment of my own imagination. O yeah, I know Harshit was in VoI, but then majority counts. 🙂

Overall Tees Maar Khan is not a musical thing to be precise, but then the music is fine and very much in sync with the movie that Tees Maar Khan is expected to be. What you might miss in this one after Om Shanti Om is just a Ajab si ajab si adaayein. Jag Soona Soona Laage was not meant to be a part of Tees Maar Khan anyway I guess.

As of now, what I loved the most, a bit surprisingly for myself, is ‘Happy Ending.’

Let Down: Tees Maar Khan title. I think the title theme should have been given to V-S. They can prove pretty good at such things. Doesn’t the Golmaal theme say so?

Rajneeti: Review

When i was in school and we were asked to write essays on our favourite books i always wrote Mahabharata. There is a saying in Bengali :”Ja nei bharate, ta nei bharate” which means anything that did not find a place in the great epic, does not exist in India. Politics forms the crux of the epic. Dynastic politics, feud over property, power tussle between blood relations make each page of the greatest story ever told so gripping. But an adaptation of the same with Indian electoral politics as the backdrop fails to impress much. Specially so because this film comes from the kitty of Prakash Jha (who had raised the bar of film making with Gangajal). Had Karan Johar made this film i would have been all praises (like i was in MNIK; that film was pathetic too). Rajneeti works because Mahabharata works.

I will not go into the story of the film. I would just try to talk about certain aspects of the film which if absent could have made Rajneeti a classic. First is the screenplay. In the first half of the film it almost resembles a Yash raj drama! Specially the scenes between Ranbir and Katrina! The scenes went by too fast and editing was really bad which hampered the flow of the film. The songs were complete misfit and could have been given a miss! Prakash Jha should really learn how to use songs as background scores. Some concepts were cliche ridden. Dialogues were stale in most parts and evoked laughter in some serious scenes (like “tum mere jyesth putra ho”). The director’s attempt to adapt Mahabharata boomerangs. He lets many strings loose which becomes very difficult for him to sort out by the end of the film.

This is an extract of Aagan‘s review. Complete Review at Aaganzworld.

Update: I watched Raajneeti and absolutely loved it. My suggestion, Do watch it, if you like or have any interest in that bad game called Politics. I have. 🙂

Mora Piya – Rajneeti

Oops! That sounds good. I just happened to see a flicker of Rajneeti’s song Mora Piya on television and in the very first time, it sounded Kinda good. As I searched, I got to know that the song was composed and sung by Aadesh Srivastava. No debate again on whether Aadesh Srivastava is underrated or not.
Continue reading “Mora Piya – Rajneeti”

Rajneeti: Trailer

Prakash Jha’s Rajneeti might be awaited, but NOW, it will be really awaited. I think we need such trailers for movies to be hit. The trailer reminds me of Mahabhrat (intendedly, of course) with a wonderful voice over that sounds like that by Nana Patekar. Well, no discussions on that for now. Watch the trailer. Listen to the voice over. To Vande Mataram. And wait for May 28th.
Continue reading “Rajneeti: Trailer”

Ajab Prem ki Ghazab Kahani: Movie Review

If you think Rajkumar Santoshi is the director of so-serious-movies like Ghayal, Damini, China Gate, Pukar, Lajja, Legend of Bhagat Singh and Khakee, you are missing something. He’s the man who gave us Andaz Apna Apna. And now he’s there with Ajab Prem ki Ghajab Kahani.

Ajab Prem ki Ghazab Kahani

OK. Frankly, Andaz Apna Apna is a classic and nobody, I repeat, nobody can make it again. So let’s see APKGK from a new frame.

First things first. All good movies don’t need things like mind and reasoning. APKGK is one of those movies.

The movie starts on a light note with Ranbir Kapoor, or Prem, the President of Happy Continue reading “Ajab Prem ki Ghazab Kahani: Movie Review”