Haunted – 3D: Music Review (Chirantan Bhatt)

The album starts with KK singing Tum ho mera pyaar which for once gives you an illusion that it’s a Nadeem Shravan song with its beats and by the time I was finished with the song, I was remembering the days when Pritam used to get KK for one hit song in almost every movie, especially around Gangster. Nice and nostalgic.

The next, Jaaniya, by Siddharth Basrur, is a lovely ballad with some captivating beats. May not sound too good immediately after a rocking Tum ho mera pyaar, but a wonderful song with its own identity, nonetheless.

The next song, tera hi hona chahoon, brings in Jojo with Najam Sheraz. The song that interestingly starts with a Tabla, later turns into almost full-fledged rock number. And I’d say kudos to Chirantan for pulling that off quite well. Third song in a row that is not bad, at the least.

Next comes Mujhe de de har gham tera, which is a sad song by its lyrics but sounds soothing by its music. Interestingly (for me at least), the combination generally makes a great, at least quite good song, in longer term. And I am liking the song already. Good, but takes time, as I said.

The next name is of Nikhil D’Souza, who comes up to sing You’re so beautiful, an expectably romantic, and not-so-expectably Hindi song, in his own typical style (yeah, he has one) which gives the album a little more variety, something the album kinda lacks even with such beautiful songs.

The end of album comes with the actress Tia Bajpai singing a song called Sau Baras, and quite admirably, she sounds good even with very few instruments playing in the background. The song is more like poetry, at least the first half of it. Nice, kinda gives the album it’s only song with a female as Tum ho mera pyaar hardly gives Suzi a chance.

So overall Haunted – 3D is a ‘not bad at all’ album which one would like to listen to even though it doesn’t have much new to offer. Probably because it takes you back to those days that you haven’t probably realized have passed, or maybe simply because of its good, if not ‘very’ good, quality. Wait, was that last sentence too philosophical for a review?

Ten ‘Pop’ songs you shouldn’t miss

‘Pop’ is a genre of music, but for me, it’s been private albums and bands, which made all the ‘pop’ for me in childhood, and I still use the word like that many times. Hence, today I present a list of my favorite ‘pop’ songs, in no particular order, hoping that some of the songs that deserve to be heard reach a few more people.

Tere Naina (Jhoomo re/ Kailasa): One song I love like anything. I can listen to this one at any time, anywhere. And I just love it always. Deep, soulful, moving Kailasa.

Kothay Uttay (Saari Raat/ Devika): A song based on Hindustani Classical music as per the album cover of Saari Raat. A piece with some soft beats and lovable music. Barkha Bahar of the same album is a close too.

Meri Tarah (Fitoor/ Mohit Chauhan): It’s difficult choosing one song in this nostalic-ish album of Mohit. My guess is I picked this one for its awesome lyrics, which are again penned by the singing genius himself. A soft, lovable one in that super voice.

Har Jagah mein (Tu hi mere Rab ki tarah hai/ Mithoon): Mithoon’s album never made it big, but there were some good song in the debut album of this little master of music and this one is probably one of them. I’d say a typical Mithoon song with him at his best.

Mann Chandre (Connections/ A R Rahman): A R Rahman. Sukhwinder Singh. And a bit-sad, bit-philosphical, punjabi song. Do I need to say more? I guess not. Still I’d say, listen to the awesome chorus in the song. Rahman is not one who uses a chorus too much, but when he does, the effect is something like you can see here.

Mehfooz (Mehfooz/ Euphoria): Euphoria at its best is not always euphoric. Sometimes it’s sad, sometimes it cries out loud. Mehfooz might not be the top selling album of the band but the title song of the album is as deep and touching as any of their best hits. At par with mayeri and ab na ja, mehfooz is something to cherish forever.

Rain bhai kaari kaari (Humsafar/ KK): I don’t know what I should call this song, but it’s like a mix of somewhat classical stuff with some rock mood. KK, in his album Humsafar, sings this wonderful song called rain bhai kaari kaari din ujiyara. All I’d say is, listen to it, at least once.

Kaise jiye hain hum (Maheroo/ Jojo): I remembered Jojo for that mad song called Woh Kaun thi since my childhood, and then there was Maheroo, his other album after a long time. Hoping for a great album, I did listen to the whole album. Well, album wasn’t all that great but there was a song that I completely fell in love with. Kaise Jiye hain hum. A nostalgic song from someone destroyed in love (line copied from Fanaa), it has a nostalgia mix too, with the sound of a train. Interestingly, the mix is worth a try too.

Saiyyan (Jhoomo re/ Kailasa): Another song of the best of Kailash Kher. Came after Teri Deewani. Though popular, the song couldn’t do so well as Teri Deewani, but I think I love this one more. Only two words for the song – Kailash Kher.

Door Kahin (Nine): I hope you reach the end of this post, because Door kahin of Pankaj Awasthi is not only a favorite of mine, it’s different too. It’s a romantic song, with lyrics deep dpwn in romanticism, but it’s nothing like a typical romantic song. A wonderful thing to listen to.

Just do tell me if you like the songs. And also if u don’t.

Tip: I’m bookmarking this page myself. 🙂

Hide and Seek: Music Review

Hide and Seek is composed by three people Chirantan Bhatt, Gourov Dasgupta and Rakesh Batra. The first song of the album, Jingle Bells sounds like the popular ringtone which is a similar spoof on Twinkle Twinkle Little Star. The lyrics of the song are a bit okay, else, it’s a complete down. May be liked for one time or so.
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