Ishaqzaade: Music Review (Amit Trivedi, Lyrics: Kausar Munir)

And with Ishaqzaade, Amit Trivedi surprises you again.

After listening to Suraj Jagan’s rocking Aafaton ke Parinde, I was expecting some rock from the title song, but Javed Ali’s simple rendition of the title song not only caught me off guard, I knew that the song was going to grow on me. And so it was. Growing on me slowly, every time I heard it. The reasons were plenty. One, the song was quite new for me, as in, it was a simple, nice composition, very much Indian at the heart and Javed Ali sings it very much that way, but it has sax and western drums, which give way to Indian style beats. That was just some analysis I could do, I hope you get the essence. The song suddenly shifting from Javed to Shreya at the end is interesting, though nothing really new, yet Shreya once again surprises with her singing, or rather the voice here. Just listen to the song. A few times.

Hua Chhokra Jawan re. An Amit Trivedi desi song, with a touch of brass band effect, mostly from the drums used. Sunidhi Chauhan is the best part of the song, as the lyrics get full justice done to them the way she sings them. Vishal Dadlani is definitely not bad, but he didn’t here need the depth that generally comes with his voice, and I’m not such a big fan of his masti-mood songs, like Dhaeon-Dhaeon, and this. Still, interesting stuff, to say the least. Worth a try definitely.
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Ghost: Music Review (Toshi-Sharib)

I don’t know how many today are interested in listening to an album with Shiney Ahuja as the main lead of its movie. But I certainly have interest in listening to a Toshi-Sharib album. And hence, a review.

Toshi and Akram Sabri’s Jalwanuma shows the good and the bad of the brothers. The song is just like almost all the other hits from the brothers, but still the song sounds as nice as any of them and sticks like anything. Basically, couldn’t help liking it, even with nothing new in it.

The next song, Sunidhi’s Aaja Khatam Sabr kar de, is a nice number again, and though the song doesn’t have anything too interesting or new, it’s a simple, nice number on a good melody.

Song number three Salame Salame gets Shaan singing with Sharib. And the song is the type that would need quite some publicity before it can be popular, which I presume is not gonna be there easily. Shaan almost gets into the color of Sharib-Toshi here. And yeah, I was wondering how come so many of Shaan’s song have that word ’tishnagi.’

The next singer happens to be Javed Ali, who in Dil ke Liye once again sounds a lot like Sonu Nigam, especially in the higher notes. In fact Javed’s singing here, though quite good, reminds me of Kumar Sanu and even hints of Udit Narayan. Still, the song doesn’t sound like coming from ’90s, but has effects of Toshi-Sharib quite clear. Still, worth listening to.

The last song of the album Kahan hai tu is sung by Sharib alone. The rock number with some sad lyrics has some nice sounds that make it worth a listen again.

Overall, Ghost is a VERY Sharib-Toshi album with almost nothing new but still almost everything very much listenable. Somehow Sharib-Toshi are still able to maintain interest in their songs even with their repetitive style. Big deal I guess.

Jaana Pehchana: Music Review (Ravindra Jain)

When I heard the first song of Jaana Pehchana (sequel to 1978 movie Ankhiyon ke jharokhon se), Hairatzada hoon main, I was wondering whether I’d be able to unbiasedly review the song as it was sung by Sachin, someone I have loved, for not only his acting and direction, but also his knowledge of music as well as his singing, and his very occasional singing too. But then as I heard the song once and twice, Ravindra Jain’s music, which gives you a touch from original movie’s soundtrack, seemed to touch me, even though it has not changed much with the time. Nothing too great in the song but if you like Jain’s music, here is another simple and likable number for you.

Kavita Seth sings the next track, Ek Farishta mil gaya hai, in a relatively more raw voice, that compared to her own voice in many other songs. But interestingly, as you move into the song, you kind of like it more and more; of course, if you have an ear for the slow number. The arrangements, a bit too old for the times, and giving a more of late 80s-early 90s can be a drawback for the song, but liked it fine.

Jis mod pe jis haal mein is a small one and half minute track based on Ankhiyon ke jharokhon se title track, probably a sad version that was missing in the 1978 movie. Simple n nice.

The surprise of the album comes as Javed Ali’s Zindagi mein Kahin na Kahin. Sonu Nigam has sounded, willingly or unwillingly, like Mohd Rafi many times, and many a times I personally felt Javed Ali’s was a very similar voice as Sonu’s. But never did I think before this song that Javed could sound so much like Rafi. The seriousness of Javed’s voice gets the old-age composition of Ravindra Jain and gets me a completely nostalgic song, so much that I heard it a few times without thinking about anything other than Rafi, and of course, Javed. Do listen to the song if you miss the songs of those years in today’s age.

Sadhana Sargam’s Jaisi bhi hai ye zindagi is once again based on the title of Ankhiyon ke jharokhon se. Less than two minutes track’s length is another thing that helps manke it sound nice, as the length definitely doesn’t let things get boring.

The last song hai ranj ka samaan too, as I had somehow expected, happens to be based on Ankhiyon ke jhaorkhon se title track, this time at the original’s pace, though again barely one and half minutes.

Overall, the album doesn’t have much new, but a lot of small tracks, half of the number, which are based on one old title track. Still, ZIndagi mein kahin na kahin is something to listen to, and Kavita Seth’s EK Farishta isn’t bad. I wonder if Rajshri should have got a few more original tracks like them rather then depending so much on the single old stuff.

I am Kalam: Music Review (Abhishek, Madhuparna, Papon, Shivji, Susmit)

Abhishek Ray’s composition for the words chaand taare jeb mein hain is well sung by KK and makes a nice listen. The next, Shreya’s Chini bhini, again composed by Abhishek, has lyrics bubbling with enthusiasm and Shreya is kind of surprising in this one as she sings the song in a little intoxicated voice. The combination of lyrics and music here is not really what one would expect seeing the lyrics, but it sounds nice the way it is.
Madhuparna composed Rang Jamale reminds me of Chak de the way it starts, but then the song has only a touch from there, more in the terms of arrangements than composition. The composition seems to have more touches from here and there, but does sound fine and Javed fits well here. The female version of the song, sung by Anushka Manchanda, is a little different from her regular more-English-than-Hindi songs and she sounds different, and nice. One good part is that Anushka doesn’t let the instruments overpower her voice here.

Papon’s self composed (probably his first in Bollywood) Zindagi aisi waisi is quite lovely and makes Papon sound promising once again, this time as a composer as well. I had already loved him in Jiyein Kyun, but this time he sounded more serious. Protique Mojoomdar’s positive lyrics are definitely a plus.

Susmit Bose and Shivji Dholi’s Jeevan ek rangoli hai is more of a live thing and the folk’ish number sounds different, like it’s recorded out of the recording rooms, like old songs. But the lyrics of the song are good and the song gives a ‘real’ feel.

Udan pe baitho kaaga bole is another small, real sounding track from Shivji Dholi which is almost unplugged with just a harmonium to support him.

The last track, children’s version of chaand taare jeb mein hain is an okay one. The version reminds me of Chillar Party where Amit Trivedi had got some children to sing in a wonderful manner, but here there is nothing like that and children just make a good chorus, like it happened in old movies during one time. Not bad.

Overall, I am Kalam is a good album with assorted composers. Interestingly the album doesn’t have usual run of the mill songs and also the lyrics of almost all the songs are good, irrespective of who they have been written or sung by. I hope the movie is equally good.

Buy I am Kalam Audio CD Here.

Bubblegum (2011): Music Review (Bapi-Tutul, Hanif Sheikh)

Bubblegum starts with the title song, Bubblegum, sung by Salim Merchant. The peppy-poppy song sounds okay and may work well as a background number.

The next number, Holika, is a Holi song sung by Kailash Kher, with very typical-traditional dholak based song with Indian style rap in between, something that reminds me of Raghubeer Yadav in Kailash’s voice. Nice one if you are up for this.

Javed Ali’s soft, romantic ‘nostalgia‘ is ready to talk one into childhood with very light music, just supporting the words. Totally liked even though the song is hardly musical. Nice job by Javed.

The last track, Party song, is a three minute parody by Hanif Sheikh with just one to two lines taken from every song, more of them of before ’90s. A little funny, okay.

If you ask me in one word, Bubblegum is ‘different.’ Not exactly good, but not really bad for an album from which I was expecting almost nothing, mainly because of Javed’s Nostalgia.

U R My Jaan: Music Review (Sanjeev Darshan)

The album starts with Shaan’s feel-like-’90s Kya kare dil bechara. The song has an okay melody and doesn’t sound really good, but doesn’t sound bad either. An okay one, reminding me of Anu Malik days of the ’90s.

The next song, that is the title track, is very Nadeem-Shravan’ish in its arrangements and is sung by Sanjeev himself with Shilpa Rao to support. The song is a good listen if you put it a few years back, but today, it seems the song could have been worked on a little more. Also, bringing in a professional singer instead of Sanjeev could be helpful.

The third track, Mera Maula Kare, sung by Roop Kumar Rathod, is a good one. The only thing that disappoints a bit is the climax of the melody after the lovely build up, but once you have heard it, the song does sound good. Sanjeev Darshan do create something worthy of their uncle’s voice here.

The next song, Shreya’s Main Zameen pe hoon, sounded like the most complete song of the album to me. Not that the song is the best of the album, but the way the composer duo have made this one, it doesn’t feel like there is anything left to do, hence giving a feeling of completion for the type of the song it is. Peppy, well sung, nice.

The Next track, bin tere we mahi, sung by Master Salim and Richa Sharma is a nice Qawwali’ish composition and though there is nothing much new in the song, it’s worth a listen as the singers have done a good job here.

The last track of the album, Chand wahi hai, is a nice sounding, seen and heard so many times, romantic track sung by Javed Ali and Shreya Ghoshal. Okay end to the album.

Overall, the album is not great and is kinda insignificant, but is not as bad as I had expected it to be. Sanjeev Darshan are yet to be good enough to compete with today’s composers and to an extent, still have to come out of ’90s phase, but it was a nice try from them here.

Thank You: Music Review

Anees Bazmee definitely does things in an upside down way. That’s how there is Thank You after Welcome. This one again comes from the Pritam’s Factory of Dance-n-forget Music. Here comes a review.

The album starts with Mika’s Pyaar do Pyaar lo, that you might have caught on TV. The oldie-newie song sounds more like a remix and looks very much like a try to redo apni to jaise taise from Housefull. I guess Pritam has been successful, but not so much as SEL were with theirs.

The next song, Razia, is sung by Saleem and Ritu Pathak, but Saleem can be confused for a girl with his high pitch here. Allah bachaye meri jaan ki razia gundon mein phans gayi sounds like a typical item song and Ritu sounds pretty good with her singing. Nothing new, just another good product from the Factory.
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Toonpur Ka Superhero: Music Review

With Toonpur ka Superhero, Anu Malik gets an album after a long gap that was running from last year’s Kambakkht Ishq. As the movie is a live action-animation, the songs have to be made according to children’s choice and to some extent Anu Malik, and more than that Rishi Rich succeed in that. Here is a review.

The album starts with Let’s go to Toonpur, the only song composed by Rishi Rich, performed by Veronica, Mumzy and H-Dhami. It’s a song with the movie’s story running in it while the light pop music of the song should be liked not only by children but may prove addictive to all.
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Aakrosh: I say Yes.

When the world was getting blown away with Rahman’s Jhootha hi Sahi, Pritam’s Aakrosh came out too, and it was good to see I was liking the songs even with Call me Dil running in my mind already. Without saying a lot, I start the review.

The album starts with Tere isak se meetha kuch bhi nahi. The Item number sung by Kalpana Patowary with Ajay Jhingaran is quite good and the girl’s voice shines in the very start, though later on the voice sounds a bit pressed under the instruments. Still, one more hit in the list UP-Bihar songs is ready. 🙂

The second song, Saude Bazi by Anupam Amod is a surprise from the first note sung by the chorus. A beautifully arranged composition by Pritam, I felt the song should go a long way, right when I heard it for the first time. Soft, Romantic, with a different voice, and lovely lyrics. What else would one want. Superb.
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Jhootha Hi Sahi: Music Review

No, it’s never easy to comment on a song composed by Rahman. Reasons are many. For one, they’re never ‘bad.’ You’ll always like them at least a bit even if at the start they sound strangest thing in the world. Secondly, he has built so high reputation and expectations in people’s minds that it’s not easy to get to that level even with the best songs. And then, he has so many fans. But the worst thing is that u can not always be sure of disliking a song of his. Probably that is why he is Rahman.

Anyway, here is a review of his new album, Jhootha hi Sahi.

The album starts with the child’s play called Cry Cry. A song that is going to be a hit simply because of it’s simplicity. Though I didn’t like the lyrics of the song much, the message the song gives is good and Rashid Ali and Shreya’s singing is sweet. Not too good in terms of music, but a likeable thing.
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Music Review: Robot: Hindi

Robot, the Hindi version of Rajnikant-Aishwarya’s Enthiran was a much waited album, composed by A R Rahman. Here is a review of the album.

The album starts with O Naye Insaan and you get to know that this Robot is going to be actually robotic. The song anyhow sounds good as Srinivas croons in two almost different voices, doing the awesome work that is done by two people in Tamil and Telugu. The song has a deep electronic effect and you can feel you’re listening to some sci-fi music. The song is mechanical from the very start and the beginning is the most interesting, I’d say addictively so. But the lyrics are too tough and I doubt many people would be able to understand much in the first few times. Khatija, Rahman’s daughter who sings for the first time here, sounds like a child and I guess it’ll take some time before she should come to sing full-fledged.
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Raavan: Music Review

maaguvanjalo.. aagubenjaaaalo…
a aen aen aen e eo.. a aen aen aen e eo..

Got what is that? Start of a good album, and a wonderful song. The album is called Raavan, and the song is, yes, you get that. Beeera. Beera, beera beera beera, beera beera beera beera beera, beera ke dus maathe, beera ke sau naam, chhede jo beera ko, dhama dham dham dham. If there was anything that could ever be compared to beera, it was probably Omkara, but seems Omkara also stays behind beera when it comes to being musical.
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Apartment: Music Review (Bappa Lahiri)

Apartment, Rent at Your Own Risk definitely looks like a ‘watch at your own risk’ movie. The music for the film is composed by Bappa Lahiri. Here is a review of the album.

The problem of Bappa Lahiri till date seems to be the lack of newness. He has not been able to give much new with an exception of Jai Veeru. Apartment looks like a continuation of the same as there is not much really fresh though there are a few songs about and above average.
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Raavan: Soundtrack

So finally Mani Ratnam’s Raavan is here. Or so it will be, on April 24th, when Rahman’s music is out. Abhishek Bachchan can be seen in the video of Beera sets up a high expectation from the album, as well as the movie. Here is the soundtrack listing of the movie as found yet.

Behene De – Karthik
Beera Beera – Vijay Prakash
Kata Kata – Ila Arun, Sapna Awasthi & Kunal Ganjawala
Khilli Re – Reena Bhardwaj
Ranjha Ranjha – Rekha Bhardwaj & Javed Ali
Thok De Killi – Sukhwinder Singh

So hopes from the songs of Raavan are high. Check the video of the first song Beera too.

Prem kaa Game: music review

Raju Singh’s music means mostly catchy tunes, and Prem kaa game is no exception. This time he comes up with some big names like Sonu, Sunidhi, Shreya, Javed Ali and even Vishal Dadlani. The result is nothing great but he manages to make an average album. Here is a review.
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