My Friend Pinto: Music Review (Ajay-Atul et al.)

Dhinchak Zindagi didn’t sound so dhinchak to me even with its not bad melody, probably because of its arrangements, and Kunal sounds a bit too enthusiastic here, but then that probably goes with the song. Overall fine, but not too great.

The next, do kabootar gets some reduction in noise levels, and even though it’s Kunal again, the song and the singing are both better. Even though the song is nice, if you listen to the lyrics, they seem worthy of a little more serious tune. Not bad still. Like it.
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Stanley ka Dabba: Music Review (Hitesh Sonik)

Life bahot simple hai. If you are not yet humming this, you’ll soon be, that much I can tell you for sure. Shaan almost does a bum bum bole without exactly getting into that mood and pitch. A soft, innocent, lovely song that is good for you, whatever age you are.

Sukhwinder’s Dabba has some trying-to-do-a-Gulzar lyrics and while the lyricist Amole Gupte gets some on and off success, the overall effect of music, lyrics, and Sukhwinder’s singing is quite likeable. The innocence in Sukhi’s voice once again tells you how that man of hiiiiighhhhh notes can be humble with his voice too. Nice.

The next comes Nanhi si jaan, a light rock number sung by Shankar Mahadevan with a melody that sounds somewhat like that of the ’90s to me. Still, Shankar makes the song worthwhile to an extent. And then, after listening to the entire album, I expect that the song will find its place as the movie comes up. Hopefully.

The next song, Tere andar bhi kahin, is sung by Vishal Dadlani. The song is a light rock number again, but this one is quite different in its treatment and words take precedence over everything in this one. Somehow Vishal’s voice seems to be doing justice to the poetry in this one. Not too ‘musical,’ but it’s lovely and I expect the movie will make this one a favorite.

The next song, the only one in the album with a female voice, Jhoola Jhool by Hamsika Iyer is a short lullaby that sounds lovely if you’re patient enough. A small piece of good work by Hitesh.

The next small piece, Aditya rox, a version of tere andar bhi kahin, is not really very musical, but I liked it nonetheless. Though I don’t think I’ll be listening much to this one.

The last piece of the album is an instrumental which makes me feel once again that Amole Gupte is not yet out of Taare Zameen Par as ‘Thirsty‘ or Stanley Theme definitely more or less reminds you of Kholo Kholo darwaze more than anything. And then of course, going back to the first song may prove that Amole is at least trying to give people an idea that it’s something, in some way, close to or related to TZP.

Still, the overall impact of the album is good. The music is fresh and Amole’s lyrics definitely speak for his movie only. The good part is that even though you can relate the music to the children’s movie, you can enjoy it anyway, something I’d consider a huge achievement for a debutant album composer in Bollywood.

Break ke Baad: Predictable..

I have some strange opinion about Break ke Baad. I was quite waiting for the album and now that it’s arrived and I see things similar to what I had expected, I am disappointed.

The album sounds quite like a typical Vishal-Shekhar thing, something I never wanted to exist, because I never wanted them to be typecast. Anyway, here is a review of the album. Btw, there is one thing in album I totally loved, Prasoon Joshi’s lyrics.

The first song, Adhoore tum Adhoore hum sung by Vishal Dadlani and Alyssa Mendonça is a rock-ish thing that you can hear and tell the composer now. The song is quite likeable and gets stuck in the mind, and fairly speaking, everything with the song is right other than its predictability. Alyssa’s voice sounds good here too. Go for it.
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