Music Review: Rush (2012 film, music composed by Pritam)

Pritam and Ash King is turning out to be a winning combination. Once again Pritam gives Ash a similar kind of song, though this time Muazzam Beg n Rizwan Ali Khan make it all interesting. Kahin ye tere dil se to chhup chhup ke milta nahi is definitely worth listening to. Nicely composed. Even better arrangements and that chorus’ singing.

The next, Fukraa is a catchy one sung by Jazzy B with Hard Kaur. The song is simple, with an average melody, but the catchy elemnt is taken care of with some okay arrangements. Not a blockbuster, but will work, especially on dance floors, in remix versions.

The second highlight of the album is called Mumkin Nahi. Instead of reading this, you can listen to the song. Though I didn’t so much like Tulsi’s average singing in the song. The song has a flavor of Tum Mile, with its long, lovely melody, and touching lyrics. But I was most surprised by Anupam Amod, who though sings well always, this time seemed to be kinda close to KK in this rendition. DO listen.

O re khuda is a ballad with some wonderful lyrics again. Don’t yet know the lyricist, though the maqta of the sher at the end names Faraaz. Interestingly, Javed Bashir seems to sing here somewhat in Adnan Sami’s style. Listen to this one for the lyrics, and also Javed’s singing.

With Rab ka Junoon, Pritam brings in full-fledged hard rock (is this metal? not sure.) to Bollywood, the track with very little lyrics and a lot of music was okay for me, though I am hardly into rock. Try this one if you want to try rock. If you’re here, I doubt you’d be someone into full-fledged rock.

The last song, Hote Hote, is a beat based one, more of a pop piece, and again brings in Ash, this time with Hard Kaur. Ash’s part of the song, jo bhi ho, jo bhi ho, is catchy, and does attract you. Also the beats of the song are not unheard, but still okay, will be liked after repeated listening.

The end comes with a repeat of chhup chhup ke, the opening song, with Shaan replacing Ash King. Didn’t really feel a need for this one, but Shaan sounds okay.

Overall, Rush has some really good songs, chhup chhup ke and Mumkin Nahi are must listen. Rest aren’t bad too. Worth a try for all, and worth a buy if you’re a music lover.

Chatur Singh Two Star: Music Review (Sajid-Wajid)

The album starts with Sajid-Wajid-Hard kaur sung Chandni Chowk se or Dekh Tamashe, which is pretty banal with Hard Kaur’s typical rap followed by a song just full-of-beats and so many instruments as I have heard them a lot. The next, Ishqan da Ishqan da has Sonu Nigam and Shweta Pandit singing. This one has a little OK tune and with Sonu singing, the song could be something worth listening to, with some better arrangements.

Jungle ki Hirni hoon is a typical ‘item number’ sung by Sunidhi Chauhan that is nothing too great but can work fine for yet another item song. The next, Murga anda dega, or the title song as you can call it, is again not a great one, but Sanjay Dutt sings this one, and the background arrangements have been added a few extra things that may sound interesting with the kind of lyrics it has. No, the rap wasn’t required.

The last song, Singh Singh Singh is again one sung by Sanjay Dutt himself, along with Wajid, Khurram Iqbal and Asif Ali Beg. But this one fails as well as the song looks more like background of those ’70s movies to me.

Overall, Chatur Singh Two Star is two star for true. Need say more?

Mausam (2011): Music Review (Pritam)

13 tracks. 6 original songs. 11 singers. With some singing more than one song and some songs getting different singers for different versions. In short, Pritam does his best to create a full mix and match combination, and the results seem pretty good. There we go with a review.

Rabba main to mar gaya oye. Shahid Mallya. A nice song with lovely, romantic lyrics and Shahid Mallya’s slightly husky voice goes quite well with the light music of the song with a little Punjabi touch. Good start.

The second song may remind you of thoda thoda pyaar with its video and initial arrangements, but once Mika gets into singing saj dhaj ke tashan mein rehna, you know it’s a typical Mika thing where you can lose yourself and dance like mad. I may be biased here, but I kinda loved Pankaj Kapur’s single line entry here.

Next comes Hans Raj Hans with ik tu hi tu hi, a sad song which not only boasts of some nice arrangements and lovely use of chorus (should I say a bit Rahman’ish), but also some beautiful lyrics from Irshad Kamil. Do listen to this one. I am wondering at how composers are turning to Hans raj Hans for serious stuff like this one or rather how it didn’t happen much earlier.

The next treat comes from Rashid Khan who sounds in his full color as he sings Poore se zara sa kam hain. I must applaud Pritam here for giving Rashid full command over the song as the latter sings without any background for the first minute and later also goes in a very Indian arrangement. Another good thing, you find no adulterated (politically correct: remixed) versions of the song. Do listen.

Karsan Sargathiya’s aag lage us aag ko has more than a touch of folk, especially with Dholi Taaro man Karsan’s singing. Okay this one.

Hard Kaur’s entry in the serious album sounds a bit sudden/strange/abrupt, but soon Tochi Raina takes over with an almost new avatar as he sings Mallo Malli naal yaar de, a lovely Punjabi dance number for the youth to dance on. Not a very mature song going by the standard of the album yet, but still quite interesting and listenable, or should I say danceable.

After the original songs start remixes, reprises and more. First one, Rabba, with Rahat here. Needless to say, the version is nice, but I was equally ok with Shahid Mallya’s version. In fact with nothing special for/by Rahat here, I’d prefer Shahid’s version.

After Singh is Kinng, Tiger style come in to remix for Mika’s Saj Dhaj ke, in a desi mix and a club mix, both of which don’t sound too great, but are good for dancing at parties.

Next comes a reprise version of ik tu hi tu, which is sung by Shahid Mallya this time, and the guy kind of impresses me, as he sounds as good as Hans Raj Hans did for the song. But what is a surprise here is the next version of the song, sung by Wadali Brothers. The Mehfil Mix sounds nice and quite different from the original. But then again, do not compare with Rangrez.

At the end there are two versions of Mallo Malli, which are sung by Lehember Hussainpuri with Hard Kaur and Tochi Raina alone respectively, which look a bit too much as so many repetitions were probably not required.

Overall Mausam is a really nice album from Pritam with at least four songs out of six in the ‘very good’ category. While almost the entire album seems to have a Punjabi touch, there is still variety in the songs, and not only in terms of singers used. So my verdict is: buy it, listen to it.

Lyrics from MAUSAM

FALTU: Music Review (Sachin-Jigar)

The album starts with a typical Atif song, Leja tu mujhe. Sachin Jigar create another likable but so-usual number for Atif and he sings it regularly. You can have a feel of Prince here, but I’d say the song is better than an average song of Prince. Still, you miss nothing if you don’t listen to it.

When you listen to the lyrics of Chaar baj gaye, for once you feel that the song is a try to make another Amplifier, but then there are certain differences and Hard Kaur is a bit different from what she does in every second album nowadays. The song is okay in composition but the mixture of composition, lyrics and vocals should be enough to make the song a party thing, that, if it reaches enough people.

In the next, Rab sab se sona, Sachin-Jigar do a full Pritam and make Neeraj Shridhar do a song that is typical him. The song, a relatively slow composition, works simply for its arrangements that completely go with Neeraj’s voice.

The next song, awaaz, is sung by one of the composer duo, Jigar. And while the lyrics of the album seem to stand out from the first two lines, very soon one may find similarities to A R Rahman and Sohail Sen’s patriotic compositions (latter from KHJJS). Still, the song is not too similar to any song and sounds like a good one with some fine lyrics and some likable music as well. Do try this one.

With Mika and a song named Fully Faltu, the album takes a one eighty turn and comes to a completely I-will-make-you-hum-this-at-any-cost song. Yes, aaltu-jalaltu part of the song is a bit catchy, very easy, and highly repeated so that one’s mind is almost pressurised to place it somewhere. Nothing too great, but with the tactics and promos, it should work.

Vijay Prakash and Priya Panchal come next with Gale laga le, another compositions with slight Rahman effects. I suppose this is no coincidence that the composers have come up with one of Rahman’s favorite singers. But beyond Vijay, I liked the voice of Priya who seemed to sing something like Shilpa Rao and somehow Alyssa Mendonça too. Though I liked the song, I don’t think the song offers a lot more than awaaz.

Nayee Subah is sung again by Jigar, but this time it’s something like Ale (Golmaal 3). I wonder how I’m able to find everything in the album similar to something else, but this is what I feel with every song I hear in the album.

Anyway, while the penultimate song, O Teri, sung by Jigar again, is more about seen and unseen Obscenities, Neuman Pinto’s Percentage somehow sounds somewhat like Ten on ten, but on a completely different topic. While the lyrics of the song had a huge scope of being better, the overall song somehow manages to sound okay.

Overall, in terms of music, F.A.L.T.U. does not literally characterizes its name, but is not on the opposite end either. While for a comedy songs are not too bad, in certain place there is a lot to be done. While there is not much new, songs like char baj gaye and awaaz are worth a try.

Patiala House: Music Review (Shankar Ehsaan Loy)

Laung da Lishkara is something that is definitely going to be a hit. A beautifully created Punjabi song by Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy. The not-too-fast pace of the song is lovely, and how you still don’t want it to be fast and furious is the quality of the music here. The main singer, Jassi seems like a new voice here.

The next, Kyun Main Jaagoon by Shafqat Amanat Ali Khan maybe a bit too slow for loving it the first time, but as you listen to it, you love it more and more. A beautiful track with the background music that slowly grows inside the track. The unplugged version of the song is equally good. Oh, pain in Shafaqat’s voice sounds so very natural in here.

Mehndi vi mehndi, mehndi vi mehndi. Gaadha rang je chadhiya te balle ve balle. I am reminded of Kal ho naa ho. And then of Ajab Prem ki Gazab Kahani as Hard Kaur comes in, and then Shankar Mahadevan sounds all in mad-dance mode. Well, the song sounds a bit broken at the start, but once you’re used to it, the song is definitely gonna rock you. Raula pai gaya. Raula pai gaya. Dil se gaya. Raula pai gaya.

Khwabon ke lifafon mein, kisson mein kitabon mein, Vishal Dadlani sings aadat hai woh in his soft-husky voice. Well, I was surprised quite pleasantly, but a bit confused too as to why Vishal was singing this, and then when I heard usko banane wala kuch kuch to behka hoga, I knew Vishal was the perfect singer for the song. Lovely music, superb lyrics, deep singing. Woh aadat hai is a song with some poetry. I loved it, probably the most in the album, almost as much as Kyun Main Jaagoon. Do listen.

Baby when you talk to me is one more song in the Bollywood rock. This one is sung by Suraj and the way he sings it, it reminds me of Sadka kiya, though the song is not much like that one. Simple tune, and very instantly likable.

The next song, Tumba Tumba tudak gaya, is a kinda slow Punjabi-mixed dance number which stands out for its simplicity. Hans Raj Hans does a beautiful job at this one. The song may not be the best thing when you listen to it the first time, but slowly it takes up its space in your head. Also, have hopes from the video of the video.

Kailash Kher. Richa Sharma. OK. Kailash isn’t here this time, but Richa Sharma sings the mukhda of the bhajan Kailash sang for Road to Sangam. Aval Allah. A small track for the background. Not the full bhajan though, sadly.

The next thing is the remix of kyun main jaagoon. I’m not much into remixes, but quite loved this one. Try once even if you don’t listen to remixes.

The last, baby when you talk to me remix isn’t bad either, probably because there are no huge changes made in the song and speed seems to be the same.

Oh, forgot Raula pai gaya remix. Totally enjoying it.

Overall, Patiala House may not be among the best of Shankar Ehsaan Loy, but like most of their albums, the album has some freshness, and some good ol’ things. To say the least, Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy, once again, don’t disappoint. đŸ™‚

Toonpur Ka Superhero: Music Review

With Toonpur ka Superhero, Anu Malik gets an album after a long gap that was running from last year’s Kambakkht Ishq. As the movie is a live action-animation, the songs have to be made according to children’s choice and to some extent Anu Malik, and more than that Rishi Rich succeed in that. Here is a review.

The album starts with Let’s go to Toonpur, the only song composed by Rishi Rich, performed by Veronica, Mumzy and H-Dhami. It’s a song with the movie’s story running in it while the light pop music of the song should be liked not only by children but may prove addictive to all.
Continue reading “Toonpur Ka Superhero: Music Review”

Music Review – Prince It’s Showtime

If there is one person who seems to be getting it big with Prince It’s Showtime, it’s composer Sachin Gupta. The guy has mostly got lesser known and comparatively low budget movies before this but this time the ehsaan itna sa kar de guy has got none other than Atif Aslam to sing half the songs of his huge soundtrack of 16, many of them remixes.
Continue reading “Music Review – Prince It’s Showtime”