Gangs of Wasseypur: Music Review (Sneha Khanwalkar, Piyush Mishra)

No, what’s there about this Anurag Kashyap guy, that every time he comes up with a movie, all these internet addicts, facebookers and twitterati people get up from graves and start writing praises everywhere they can. Why?

I myself am one of those net addicts, and even though I don’t exactly know the answer, it probably lies somewhere in the raw style he has, be it his films or their music. Yes, the man has used some nine composers in his nine directed movies, repeating just one of them, and coming out with different but wonderful music mostly.

This time, Anurag gets Dibakar Bannerjee’s regular composer, Sneha Khanwalkar to compose, as Dibakar goes for Vishal-Shekhar for his Shanghai, which comes in the same month.

And from here on, it’s not Anurag, but Sneha who is the point of interest. More because her music seems as raw as Anurag’s movies.

The first song of the album, Jiya ho Bihar ke lala, is the trend setter, theme setter for the movie. With those lovely beats and Manoj Tiwari, Sneha creates something really rare for the film industry, even though something of similar style should be very common on the streets of Bihar. The song, which is based on a para picked from a Nautanki in Gaya district, justifies the one month research Sneha seems to have done for the song, and Manoj Tiwari sounds like the most natural choice for the song. Full marks for this one.

Hunter, the second song of the album, is all experimental, with the music-melody normal, arrangements and voices used highly experimental, and lyrics quite double-meaning. If you get the lyrics, you’d enjoy the song a lot, else you might just like it for the experimental value.

Womaniya, however, is a simple song for the album. That said, don’t expect Shaan or Sonu Nigam to come up with a ‘dil churaya’ type song. This one is a very typical piece for all those hundred ceremonies (generally before and after weddings) where the elder ladies of the ‘mohalla’ take charge of the dholak and just sit down to share songs which are more jokes than songs. The best part of this one is that Sneha maintains the realness of the song completely with just a few added beats. And yes, if Varun Grover has written those lyrics all by himself, without help from a professional dadi-nani-aunty from the mohalla sangeets, he’s a sooper guy, to say the least.

..paataal mein ghus ja. Jisme ghusna hai ghus le, ghus meri jaan. Teri Keh ke Lunga. Okay, they are not the best words of the song, but they give you an idea of the song. The song, in iteslf, is a little dark, gives you a feel of the movie without even watching it, and you know it’d be running in the background in the xyz type of scenes. Sneha herself, is a little unusual for singer here, but with the words they sing and the way they sing them, the two are worth listening to.

Bhoos. Five minute and ten second song. And forty-five seconds of April fool. 🙂

Yes, the story is little like that only. The first 45 seconds into the song and one sings it’s a soul-stirring number from, say, Piyush Mishra, like that Sheher of Gulaal.. And then, Voila, there is a gentlemen-sangeet. A song that makes you feel like an idiot with its words, but I still love the words, because they are not really idiotic. Also the Nautanki-ish parts in the second half are lovely. One of my personal favorites on the album, probably because I’ve not really heard anything like that ever, despite its simplicity. Manish J Tipu (composer, Phas Gaye Re Obama) and Bhupesh Singh are the names on the cover.

Ik Bagal mein. I mean, there is nothing to say about the song other than it’s a TRADEMARK Piyush Mishra song. I suppose the song is written, composed, arranged, sung by Piyush Mishra only. The song is a masterpiece, and I can listen to it a hundred times. Especially towards the end the song is terrifyingly haunting and just superb, wonderful. The only complaint, it sounds so much like Duniya, despite some lovely sitar and overall difference in arrangements. Still, this one is what you must be looking for if you’re one into serious music.

Bhaiyya is a track which is again experimental, where a performance by Musahar of Sundarpur gets turned into something heavy, but the track is not so much of a success, majorly because you need to work too hard to get the words being sung.

Tain tain toon toon ti ti tee tee ta. Spoiler ahead. The spoiler is that the whole song has similar kind of lyrics, as if someone’s singing a self-made barahkhadi. You can seriously write your own lyrics for the music. Spoiler ends. And the music of the song is quite good.

Soona kar ke gharwa. I don’t know what I found in this simple dhol-manjeera song, but I just loved this one. There aren’t many words in the small song, and everything sounds real. I somehow feel like this is a simple recording from the Gaya Nautanki where Sneha found Jiya ho Bihar ke lala (I did hear jay ho Bihar ke lala in the background in this one). But no official word on this one.

Gareebi tod deti hai jo riste khaas hote hain, aur paraye apne hote hain, jab paise paas hote hain. And one more like that. But it’s the instrumental part after that that was the focus. Still, I didn’t get what really Sneha planned on providing here. Because if there was something played by the baal party, it’s more or less lost in the mixing. Not the favorite.

Womaniya, which comes as a remix-like version here (not called remix, the other version was ‘live’) is one of the highlights, and most probably will be a hit, or a superhit, depends on publicity. Do listen.

There is one song in this album that I don’t want to watch a video for. Manmauji, the song, is something I would have loved to listen on the radio in the afternoon sessions of my summer vacations with mom, without thinking if the song had a video at all. Seriously, my complaint is that the song is just two minutes and fifty-three seconds long. Sneha, wherever you are, if you’re listening, please, please, please create some more songs like that. Khula hai baajuband phata hai kaaj sambhal ke chalna hoga.

Loonga Loonga, a little too much of mixing-remixing. Skipping this one.

Humni ke chhodi ke nagariya e baba. This one from Deepak Kumar – Muzaffarpur is yet another very earthy number. In fact the song reminds me of some music that I have heard within my hometown, and in a very unimagined way, gives me a kind of peace. The only problem is that I don’t really get all the words in the song, hope that will be solved though.

So, the album is something to listen to, and the album is something all those who want to listen to ‘experimental’ music would love to have. Mind you, this album in itself is a complete season of Sound Trippin’ from Sneha. In fact the album tells me that music not always needs to be ‘composed’, you can ‘discover’ music and then produce it. Of course, that too needs a genius, but that would be a genius that would continuously learn, and it seems Sneha Khanwalkar is one such genius. More power to her.

And I hope you know by now why Anurag Kashyap is a guy talked about. No, producing a movie that features THIS music is not everyone’s kind of game. And then, that’s not all. The movie is yet to come. More power to him.

O ri Duniya.. #np

Udaan: Music Review (Amit Trivedi)

Amit Trivedi’s next is here. And since this one is him with his old group, that of Anurag Kashyap and others, things get even more interesting. Here is a music review of the album.

The first song of the album is, Aazadiyaan, the one we have been listening to, in the promos pf Udaan already on TV. But then, what we get in the promo is the end of the song, the start of the song comes a typical Amit Trivedi, though the music sounds quite like Jaane yeh kya hua of Karthik calling Karthik in the start. Lyrics of the song are really good and add to the quality of slightly rockish, good song.

Geet mein Dhalte Lafzon mein is sung by Amit and Amitabh, the composer-lyricist duo and sounds fresh. As the trend of the album builds up, one can easily see that the effect of rock can be seen pretty well on the album. Amit Trivedi seems to be having a good time with his signature rockish style of composing with added effects of soft vocals. But then, there is again those lyrics, dhool jami thi aankhon mein, khwaab khile ab laakhon mein, naya kuch naya to zaroor hai, dard ki baatein kal ki hain, aaj mein khushiyaan chhalki hai, jebon mein hum raatein liye ghooma karen, fursat ke ye mauke sabhi chooma karen. Listen to the song for those lyrics. Awesome words.

The next, aankhon ke pardon ke, or the other version of Kahani Khatm hai, is sung by Joi Barua (the Ek hulchul si guy) and Neuman Pinto. Keeps the album going in the same mood.

Mohan is someone big I don’t know. I remember the name from London Dreams where he sang Khanabadosh and this time he sings an even more awesome ‘Naav’, or Chadti Lehren Laangh na paayen. A song with Folk touch and composed by Amit Trivedi (I wonder if that is also becoming a type now) sounded really good to me even when I heard it for the first time. Go for this rock-folk.

Do we have the word Chorus anymore? I wonder the same as I read the names of the singers of Motumaster. Anyway, a masti-piece, sounding like part of college-students’-enjoyment in the context of the movie. Nothing serious here, and that is all that matters in the song.

Next in the album comes Nadi mein Talab hai, sung by Amit, Joi and Neuman, the song reminds one of Ek Hulchul si, with lyrics quite different than the mentioned. As the three sing ek udaan kab talak kaid rahegi, roko na chhod do ise, one is bound to feel the positivity of the lyrics. Good again.

The album ends with a ‘soft’ instrumental which, a bit surprisingly for me, showed no effect of rock and sounded like a heart to heart talk, after which you could let the album end and sleep peacefully. Or start again with Pairon ki bediyaan khwaabon ko baandhen nahi re…

In short, lovable album. Kinda typical stuff by Amit Trivedi, but not a thing I would call repetitive or can be disappointed with. Good music and Awesome lyrics. That makes Udaan. Go, fly.

PS: Finding the best of the song is really difficult, but I guess in terms of music ‘Naav’ is the best.

Bhool gaye hain, joote kahan utare the..

chhoti chhoti chhitrayi yaadein, bichhi hui hain lamhon ki lawn par, nange pair un par chalte chalte, itni door aa gaye hain, ki ab bhool gaye hain joote kahan utaare the.

I’ve been loving the dialogs and the song preview of Udaan. Amit Trivedi gives some good music again and Amitabh Bhattacharya’s lyrics are awesome. And then, the dialogs…

Here are the lyrics that I got from the theatrical trailer, read them, listen to them, love them.

kahani khatm hai, ya shuruaat hone ko hai
subah nayi hai ye, ya phir raat hone ko hai
aane wala waqt dega panaahen
ya phir se milenge doraahe
khabar kya, kya pata…

and an awesome end to the trailer with.. sach bhool gaye hain joote kahan utaare the, par lagta hai ab unki zaroorat nahi..

Udaan – First Look

A student leaves boarding school to study engineering while working in the steel factory of his father, whom he has not met for eight years. A father who is a tyrant from the first look. A story of hope. A story of fear. Udaan.

Directed by Vikramaditya Motwane. Produced by Anurag Kashyap, Sanjay Singh & UTV. Stars Rajat Barmecha, Ronit Roy, Aayan Boradia and Ram Kapoor.

Paanch: Movie Review

As the sentence of some guy at PFC goes, we started watching the film as critics, but Paanch turned us into mere audience very soon. I think the sentence describes Paanch quite well. I must say, had I seen Paanch before all Anurag’s movies, I would not need a Black Friday and a Dev.D to be his fan.

Paanch starts with prologue that says Evil is perhaps a child and that the film is a warning to the society in which urban ambitions and estrangement are always on the rise.

Continue reading “Paanch: Movie Review”