Music Review: Rush (2012 film, music composed by Pritam)

Pritam and Ash King is turning out to be a winning combination. Once again Pritam gives Ash a similar kind of song, though this time Muazzam Beg n Rizwan Ali Khan make it all interesting. Kahin ye tere dil se to chhup chhup ke milta nahi is definitely worth listening to. Nicely composed. Even better arrangements and that chorus’ singing.

The next, Fukraa is a catchy one sung by Jazzy B with Hard Kaur. The song is simple, with an average melody, but the catchy elemnt is taken care of with some okay arrangements. Not a blockbuster, but will work, especially on dance floors, in remix versions.

The second highlight of the album is called Mumkin Nahi. Instead of reading this, you can listen to the song. Though I didn’t so much like Tulsi’s average singing in the song. The song has a flavor of Tum Mile, with its long, lovely melody, and touching lyrics. But I was most surprised by Anupam Amod, who though sings well always, this time seemed to be kinda close to KK in this rendition. DO listen.

O re khuda is a ballad with some wonderful lyrics again. Don’t yet know the lyricist, though the maqta of the sher at the end names Faraaz. Interestingly, Javed Bashir seems to sing here somewhat in Adnan Sami’s style. Listen to this one for the lyrics, and also Javed’s singing.

With Rab ka Junoon, Pritam brings in full-fledged hard rock (is this metal? not sure.) to Bollywood, the track with very little lyrics and a lot of music was okay for me, though I am hardly into rock. Try this one if you want to try rock. If you’re here, I doubt you’d be someone into full-fledged rock.

The last song, Hote Hote, is a beat based one, more of a pop piece, and again brings in Ash, this time with Hard Kaur. Ash’s part of the song, jo bhi ho, jo bhi ho, is catchy, and does attract you. Also the beats of the song are not unheard, but still okay, will be liked after repeated listening.

The end comes with a repeat of chhup chhup ke, the opening song, with Shaan replacing Ash King. Didn’t really feel a need for this one, but Shaan sounds okay.

Overall, Rush has some really good songs, chhup chhup ke and Mumkin Nahi are must listen. Rest aren’t bad too. Worth a try for all, and worth a buy if you’re a music lover.

Cocktail Music Review (Pritam)

Heavy voices and Light rock, if mixed well, can be the key ingredients of a Bollywood hit today. And this time in Cocktail, Pritam seems to have kept this well in mind. No, not taking any credit away from him for this wonderful album, just trying to understand how it was made.

Tumhi ho Bandhu – what Pritam is.

With Neeraj Shridhar and a tune that catches you in literally seconds, not minutes, Pritam adds Kavita Seth’s voice to make a perfect cocktail of music in the very first song of the album. One that took the world by the storm, and is not going to go down too soon. It DOES make you tap your feet.

The good part about the song is that the more catchy part of the song – tumhi din chadhe..sakha tumhi – is not all that the song has. The soul of the song comes up with Kavita’s singing and Irshad’s words which seem to express a Meerabai like devotion even in the beach-madness-rock ambiance.

Daaru Desi – regular stuff from Pritam.

A song that would at one time happen to feature KK and can’t-guess-who comes up beautifully in Benny and Shalmali’s voices. After Ishaqzaade, Shalmali’s open voice singing works here too, though the song is not Pareshaan for sure. Good, worth a listen.

Mohan Kanan. Shilpa Rao. A little more Rock. And a good song. Na chhode yaariyan.

Actually people criticize me for being reminded of songs all the time while reviewing. And at times I feel that’s true. But I can’t help thinking of Kar Chalna shuru tu when I listen to Yaariyan. Not like the songs are same. It’s just the Amit Trivedi style processing of the song and the minor similarities in songs make me think of the former. However, Pritam takes a beautiful step in making Mohan sing this one. The depth in his voice is an expression in itself. Lovely that.

Second Hand Jawani. The compulsory single screen collection song.

The song with Meri behen-d jawani, second hand jawani type words. Catchy, Govinda-age music. Singers can be from India or Canada, you know what it is. Important for collection in single screen cinemas.

Tera naam japdi phiraan. Light rock, Heavy voices.

Javed Bashir here has been given a mammoth task. Of making an average song an awesome one. The track is good, and the experiment of using Javed’s voice and Sufi style singing with Nikhil’s full fledged English lyrics and some Barbie-doll style singing by Shefali turns out to be nice. However, this one could be added a unplugged kind version, with just Javed leading the song instead of the remix.

Luttna. Lovely singing. Killer lyrics.

Yep. Taking nothing out of the music, I’d say it’s the superb lyrics that make the song. Anupam Amod’s slow, shayari-ish singing is beautiful here, and the background rock track is just fine. But the overall mix gets heady, if you’re the one for it.

Welcome to India, Arif Lohar.

Heard the name and can’t place it? I bet it’s that one song of Coke Studio that you either didn’t hear much, or heard and just got stuck to. Jugni ji is here in India, in a new cover, but the packaging and the material, though changed, has not been altered too much, mostly keeping the soul of the song there. The lovers of Coke Studio might not like it too much, but Pritam has done some good work here, much of it by not working too much on the song. This one is something to listen to, a must-loop if you haven’t heard the original one. And yes, before I forget, good choice putting Harshdeep here, she is that one part of the song that’s probably better than that in original.

So that was the review that should have came ages ago. But better late than never. Hope you’re loving this Cocktail already.

Tell Me O Kkhuda: Music Review (Pritam)

The album starts with Oh-I-think-I-have-seen-this-on-tv Someone somebody. Well, I mean to say that most of you would have seen it on the TV but probably just don’t remember. Well, again, it seems what you saw on the TV was the remix version and the original version seems to be nice, decent. Sunidhi seems doing well here and the lyrics fit with the slow tune. Actually, I like, though at six minutes the song gets a little too long.

The next entry is that of Anupam Amod and Aditi Banerjee’s Love you Dad, and almost tells you the real life story of Esha Deol and Dharmendra, even though the story in the movie would be something else. Anupam Amod sounds like some singer of ’90s but sounds nice, a nice one after Saudebaazi. As for Aditi, it’s not her song really as she doesn’t get too much to sing here. Emo stuff, not bad if you like that.

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Always Kabhi Kabhi: Music Review (Pritam, Aashish, Shree D)

The album starts with Aashish Rego and Shree D’s only composition for the album, which happens to be the title track of the album. The song, sung by Bhavin Dhanak, Sanah Moidutty and Apeksha Dandekar, is a usual, funky-colleg-y number that is full of nice beats, but the less than four minutes’ track takes a lovely turn when a Sufiana voice enters the song almost a minute before the end of the song. Still don’t know which of the singers it is, but completely loved the entry, especially the way it happens there. Shame that the voice doesn’t sing much.

From the second song onwards, it gets Pritam. Antenna sounds a lot like some song from Ready, probably the sound matches character dheela hai. Also, the lyrics are written by Amitabh Bhattacharya, but didn’t like the concept of the song itself. Still, the sound of the song IS catchy and can catch up well with some good promotion.
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Kuchh Luv Jaisa: Music Review (Pritam)

Mohit Chauhan is an addiction. You must have known it by now and the opening song Naina, or the title song you may say, is yet again proving it. No, you don’t fall in love with the simple song the first time you hear it, but two or three rounds and you know it’s getting on to you. A little confusion may be there with lyrics as Mohit does a Kailash Kher, singing some female lyrics, but the song is nonetheless lovely.

The second song Thoda sa Pyaar is a beautiful one, and Sunidhi croons this heartfelt, slow number with perfection, while Anupam Amod (Saudebazi guy) has a touched-up sound in the background, nothing too great in that, but a nice experiment. The song that reminds me of New York’s Mere sang chal zara, has two more versions later in the album, out of which Naresh Iyer’s version is definitely something to listen to.

After two lovely songs, suddenly an amateur sounding baadlon pe paon enters. Not a bad one, but the song, sung by an unknown Mannan Shah sounds a bit too fast and not too maturely treated. Though if heard repeatedly, my guess is that the song will work fine.

Nikhil D’Souza enters the next song Khwab tha, in a slow, touchy mode, but since the title of the song reads rock with it, you know where it would be going and does it go, sounding quite lovely. As the song progresses, it gets better, and by the end, you may almost be ready to listen to the song again, where Mannan’s version of Thoda sa Pyaar comes up. Not bad, but Mannan sounds amateur in this much-better-than-his-previous song. I’m not yet liking this guy from Pritam. Any Shah connections?

The next track is Raghav’s confession, the other version of Khwab, interestingly sung by Nikhil again. I am not surprised by the amount of trust Pritam is putting in the guy. Probably because I’m already a fan of the singer. A bit slower than the rock version, the song sounds kinda stable and will probably be liked more in a relaxed mood. Or probably I’ll like the rock version more always. But well sung again, definitely.

The last song is Naresh Iyer’s version of Thoda sa Pyaar where I wonder who this Shefali Ghosh is and what is Pritam trying to get her to do, but then Naresh enters and I’m bowled by the smoothness of his voice once again. One beautiful track, again.

So overall, Kucch Luv Jaisaa has just four songs among its seven tracks, but most of it is likable. Except for baadlon pe paon and to some extent Thoda sa Pyaar (Raghav’s version) I would like to keep the songs in loop for some time. That, if only I’m able to get out of that album called Rewind by Band Called Nine.

Aakrosh: I say Yes.

When the world was getting blown away with Rahman’s Jhootha hi Sahi, Pritam’s Aakrosh came out too, and it was good to see I was liking the songs even with Call me Dil running in my mind already. Without saying a lot, I start the review.

The album starts with Tere isak se meetha kuch bhi nahi. The Item number sung by Kalpana Patowary with Ajay Jhingaran is quite good and the girl’s voice shines in the very start, though later on the voice sounds a bit pressed under the instruments. Still, one more hit in the list UP-Bihar songs is ready. 🙂

The second song, Saude Bazi by Anupam Amod is a surprise from the first note sung by the chorus. A beautifully arranged composition by Pritam, I felt the song should go a long way, right when I heard it for the first time. Soft, Romantic, with a different voice, and lovely lyrics. What else would one want. Superb.
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