Luv Shuv Tey Chicken Khurana: Music Review (Amit Trivedi)

Kikkli Kaller di. Hatt gayi heer di. Ranjha kare cheat ji. Kare heer kya!

If you know what Kikli kaleer di is, then may be you already know what’s up in the song. But if not, let me give you an idea. Kikli kaleer di is a ‘traditional’ dance game for little girls. You can guess what’s happening there when this is what comes out of a traditional thing. And after this, there is standard Amit Trivedi, the singer, singing with very visible stress on certain words.

And if this was not enough, there is Yo Yo Honey Singh saying Main tera Raja Hoon, Tu meri Raani Hai, Baby suraksha hi Saavdhani hai.

Amit Trivedi. All fun.

The second song is called Motorwada. I mean Motorwala. I mean, I can’t give that mix of L and D in English that Haryana uses for their motorists. But then Tochi Raina totally knows how to say it, and how to sing this song. Trivedi goes a little too experimental in interludes, but that’s what makes him what he is. Love it again, though not as impactful as the opening track.

Amit Trivedi makes a simple, melodius Punjabi track next as the title song of Luv Shuv tey Chicken Khurana. So let’s see how he goes.

1. Brings the real, earthy Punjabi voices: Shahid Mallya and Harshdeep Kaur.
2. Makes a simple tune and pours in the superb, lovely, even touching, lyrics of Shellee.
3. Keeps it simple, doesn’t do any Amit Trivedi stuff. Not even average composer stuff of today, just the basics.
4. Brings in some dhol towards the end.

Makes it perfect. Taste and let us know how you liked it.

Looni Hansi. Another earthy song gets the electronic touch that Rahman used to give, to say things like Sasural Genda Phool. Don’t know why I can’t remember an Amit Trivedi song for example, though it sounds very typical of him. Btw, don’t expect genda phool here, it’s not that dance-y from the base itself. Well done Harshdeep, again.

Makkhan Malai by Dilbahar. OK don’t ask me why I say so, but this suddenly sounds like a song of early ’90s. No, not even late ’90s. Maybe would have liked the song, but haven’t been able to remove the ’90s effect from the song and see it outside that. I can still see number of dancers doing PT exercises behind the hero. Sorry for that one, cuz the lyrics sound kinda interesting.

And with Farukhabaadi, we’re back. OK let me take a new angle. For the non-Punjabi, the song would go like this. Sound of girls laughing. Some traditional Punjabi things, some wedding songs maybe. Second line is on, wait, did they say FO? Continue, Teri maa-behen ki ma-behen ki kar doon main jay jay abhi. OK, they WERE saying FO. This is interesting.

Well, that was for someone who knows almost no Punjabi. And if you know the language, it definitely cannot make the song less interesting. In fact from then on, it’s Labh Janjua who is in the lead, but the girls, credited as chorus, the unheard-of-nowadays people, leave a strong impact. In the beginning as well as end.

What do you take from the song after listening to it once? ‘Teri ma-behen-ki-ma-behen-ki’ something something. And you get a music for that. 😉

And then there is an instrumental piece. Somehow Amit keeps it very simple, but still very intriguing, not allowing me to forward it. Great work I’d say. Loved the iktara there. And Rohwit tells me it was Rabab that they’ve used there.

Devender Singh’s version of Luni Hansi is nice, innocent. Not as good as Harshdeep, Devender sounds a little nervous, like he could do better, going by his performances I have seen. Still, worth listening to.

The end of the album comes with Kikkli Kaleer Di, Punjabi version. The song, despite my love for the Hindi version which I have heard numerous times, sounds more natural, lovely. The only thing I miss here is ‘Baby Suraksha hi Savdhani hai!’

Overall, Amit Trivedi is here. Not throughout in his regular colors, but the colors he is wearing are almost all nice. Better than some of his recent works.

Gangs of Wasseypur: Music Review (Sneha Khanwalkar, Piyush Mishra)

No, what’s there about this Anurag Kashyap guy, that every time he comes up with a movie, all these internet addicts, facebookers and twitterati people get up from graves and start writing praises everywhere they can. Why?

I myself am one of those net addicts, and even though I don’t exactly know the answer, it probably lies somewhere in the raw style he has, be it his films or their music. Yes, the man has used some nine composers in his nine directed movies, repeating just one of them, and coming out with different but wonderful music mostly.

This time, Anurag gets Dibakar Bannerjee’s regular composer, Sneha Khanwalkar to compose, as Dibakar goes for Vishal-Shekhar for his Shanghai, which comes in the same month.

And from here on, it’s not Anurag, but Sneha who is the point of interest. More because her music seems as raw as Anurag’s movies.

The first song of the album, Jiya ho Bihar ke lala, is the trend setter, theme setter for the movie. With those lovely beats and Manoj Tiwari, Sneha creates something really rare for the film industry, even though something of similar style should be very common on the streets of Bihar. The song, which is based on a para picked from a Nautanki in Gaya district, justifies the one month research Sneha seems to have done for the song, and Manoj Tiwari sounds like the most natural choice for the song. Full marks for this one.

Hunter, the second song of the album, is all experimental, with the music-melody normal, arrangements and voices used highly experimental, and lyrics quite double-meaning. If you get the lyrics, you’d enjoy the song a lot, else you might just like it for the experimental value.

Womaniya, however, is a simple song for the album. That said, don’t expect Shaan or Sonu Nigam to come up with a ‘dil churaya’ type song. This one is a very typical piece for all those hundred ceremonies (generally before and after weddings) where the elder ladies of the ‘mohalla’ take charge of the dholak and just sit down to share songs which are more jokes than songs. The best part of this one is that Sneha maintains the realness of the song completely with just a few added beats. And yes, if Varun Grover has written those lyrics all by himself, without help from a professional dadi-nani-aunty from the mohalla sangeets, he’s a sooper guy, to say the least.

..paataal mein ghus ja. Jisme ghusna hai ghus le, ghus meri jaan. Teri Keh ke Lunga. Okay, they are not the best words of the song, but they give you an idea of the song. The song, in iteslf, is a little dark, gives you a feel of the movie without even watching it, and you know it’d be running in the background in the xyz type of scenes. Sneha herself, is a little unusual for singer here, but with the words they sing and the way they sing them, the two are worth listening to.

Bhoos. Five minute and ten second song. And forty-five seconds of April fool. 🙂

Yes, the story is little like that only. The first 45 seconds into the song and one sings it’s a soul-stirring number from, say, Piyush Mishra, like that Sheher of Gulaal.. And then, Voila, there is a gentlemen-sangeet. A song that makes you feel like an idiot with its words, but I still love the words, because they are not really idiotic. Also the Nautanki-ish parts in the second half are lovely. One of my personal favorites on the album, probably because I’ve not really heard anything like that ever, despite its simplicity. Manish J Tipu (composer, Phas Gaye Re Obama) and Bhupesh Singh are the names on the cover.

Ik Bagal mein. I mean, there is nothing to say about the song other than it’s a TRADEMARK Piyush Mishra song. I suppose the song is written, composed, arranged, sung by Piyush Mishra only. The song is a masterpiece, and I can listen to it a hundred times. Especially towards the end the song is terrifyingly haunting and just superb, wonderful. The only complaint, it sounds so much like Duniya, despite some lovely sitar and overall difference in arrangements. Still, this one is what you must be looking for if you’re one into serious music.

Bhaiyya is a track which is again experimental, where a performance by Musahar of Sundarpur gets turned into something heavy, but the track is not so much of a success, majorly because you need to work too hard to get the words being sung.

Tain tain toon toon ti ti tee tee ta. Spoiler ahead. The spoiler is that the whole song has similar kind of lyrics, as if someone’s singing a self-made barahkhadi. You can seriously write your own lyrics for the music. Spoiler ends. And the music of the song is quite good.

Soona kar ke gharwa. I don’t know what I found in this simple dhol-manjeera song, but I just loved this one. There aren’t many words in the small song, and everything sounds real. I somehow feel like this is a simple recording from the Gaya Nautanki where Sneha found Jiya ho Bihar ke lala (I did hear jay ho Bihar ke lala in the background in this one). But no official word on this one.

Gareebi tod deti hai jo riste khaas hote hain, aur paraye apne hote hain, jab paise paas hote hain. And one more like that. But it’s the instrumental part after that that was the focus. Still, I didn’t get what really Sneha planned on providing here. Because if there was something played by the baal party, it’s more or less lost in the mixing. Not the favorite.

Womaniya, which comes as a remix-like version here (not called remix, the other version was ‘live’) is one of the highlights, and most probably will be a hit, or a superhit, depends on publicity. Do listen.

There is one song in this album that I don’t want to watch a video for. Manmauji, the song, is something I would have loved to listen on the radio in the afternoon sessions of my summer vacations with mom, without thinking if the song had a video at all. Seriously, my complaint is that the song is just two minutes and fifty-three seconds long. Sneha, wherever you are, if you’re listening, please, please, please create some more songs like that. Khula hai baajuband phata hai kaaj sambhal ke chalna hoga.

Loonga Loonga, a little too much of mixing-remixing. Skipping this one.

Humni ke chhodi ke nagariya e baba. This one from Deepak Kumar – Muzaffarpur is yet another very earthy number. In fact the song reminds me of some music that I have heard within my hometown, and in a very unimagined way, gives me a kind of peace. The only problem is that I don’t really get all the words in the song, hope that will be solved though.

So, the album is something to listen to, and the album is something all those who want to listen to ‘experimental’ music would love to have. Mind you, this album in itself is a complete season of Sound Trippin’ from Sneha. In fact the album tells me that music not always needs to be ‘composed’, you can ‘discover’ music and then produce it. Of course, that too needs a genius, but that would be a genius that would continuously learn, and it seems Sneha Khanwalkar is one such genius. More power to her.

And I hope you know by now why Anurag Kashyap is a guy talked about. No, producing a movie that features THIS music is not everyone’s kind of game. And then, that’s not all. The movie is yet to come. More power to him.

O ri Duniya.. #np

Ishaqzaade: Music Review (Amit Trivedi, Lyrics: Kausar Munir)

And with Ishaqzaade, Amit Trivedi surprises you again.

After listening to Suraj Jagan’s rocking Aafaton ke Parinde, I was expecting some rock from the title song, but Javed Ali’s simple rendition of the title song not only caught me off guard, I knew that the song was going to grow on me. And so it was. Growing on me slowly, every time I heard it. The reasons were plenty. One, the song was quite new for me, as in, it was a simple, nice composition, very much Indian at the heart and Javed Ali sings it very much that way, but it has sax and western drums, which give way to Indian style beats. That was just some analysis I could do, I hope you get the essence. The song suddenly shifting from Javed to Shreya at the end is interesting, though nothing really new, yet Shreya once again surprises with her singing, or rather the voice here. Just listen to the song. A few times.

Hua Chhokra Jawan re. An Amit Trivedi desi song, with a touch of brass band effect, mostly from the drums used. Sunidhi Chauhan is the best part of the song, as the lyrics get full justice done to them the way she sings them. Vishal Dadlani is definitely not bad, but he didn’t here need the depth that generally comes with his voice, and I’m not such a big fan of his masti-mood songs, like Dhaeon-Dhaeon, and this. Still, interesting stuff, to say the least. Worth a try definitely.
Continue reading “Ishaqzaade: Music Review (Amit Trivedi, Lyrics: Kausar Munir)”

Ek Main aur Ekk Tu: Music Review (Amit Trivedi)

Ek main aur Ekk tu is a good album, with some variety thrown in by Amit Trivedi. It’s not his type 1, with Anurag Kashyap connection and lots of rock, but type 2, something like Aisha, where there is variety, and freshness. However, I can feel a touch of Anjaana Anjaani in the album, in some of the songs.

Read Full Review here.

Chillar Party: Music Review (Amit Trivedi)

The album starts with Tayn Tayn Phiss that sounds more like a song played on Ganpati Puja due to its arrangements, but my guess is once the video is out, the song should work, and look somewhat like aali re, though with a lesser punch, of course.

Somehow the second song of the album, Aa rela hai apun, sounds like you’re listening to the first song again. It surprises all the more because in the third song…

…you meet yet another facet of Amit Trivedi. The guy not only brings Mohit Chauhan in his breezy way, he even creates some wonderful arrangements with children and various sounds that give you something new. And Mohit Chauhan rocks with Amit Trivedi as he sings Ek hi thaali ke Chatte batte.

The fourth song of the album, Ziddi Piddi, is almost like a rockish war cry and has been sung by Amit himself along with Armaan Malik, Tanmay and Gaurika. The way song is made, it may not be liked instantly, but then with the movie it should work as a perfect background.

One of the best things Amit does in the album is his work with children. In this track called Ek School banana hai, there is some wonderful use of children’s voice, and more than that their chorus. Touches of Udaan may be visible here, but the lyrics and the way children take up the song create difference.

The next track of the album is some hard rock, coming from two children again, but in some tough tone. ‘Behla do, fusla do, baalon ko sehla do, hum chup ho jayenge.. bachchon ka dard koi dard hi nahi’ are lyrics that attract you enough before you can get engaged by the music. Liked this. Do listen to the words here.

Liar Liar Pants on Fire. The song has three main elements, some simple music, the (bit-too-)witty lyrics, and the innocent voice of I suppose Gaurika Rai. Add to that the addictive kind chorus and result is the song. I don’t know how much I liked the song but definitely is not ignorable, especially the chorus.

The album ends with a little more experiment on the best of the album as Mohit comes up with a sad version of Chatte Batte, which deep down, sounds like Taare Zameen Par title song, in terms of lyrics. There is nothing really ‘sad’ about the song, but it’s slightly touchy and Mohit’s voice works perfectly with the little background music. A perfect end to the worth-a-try album with its ups (Chatte-batte, followed by ek school) and downs (probably the second sound, more for being a repeat of the first).

I am. Music Review.

Amit Trivedi. 3/6. Vivek Philip. 1/6. Rajiv Bhalla. 2/6. And a good album. Onir does it quite well it seems. A review.

The album starts with Amit Trivedi’s Baangur, sung by Mame Khan and Kavita Seth. The song has that typical Amit Trivedi beat in the background but even though the album bears Amit’s signature, it is completely worth listening to. While Mame sounds a bit like Mohan only, Kavita makes things interesting for sure. A good combination of singers and music.

When the second song Isi baat pe starts, for once you may feel it’s the first song going to be repeated, but then in comes probably the first big name of an Amit Trivedi composition, KK. But somehow, since the song has the same background as Bangur, it doesn’t leave so much of an effect. A good song, nonetheless.

The next song Bojhal se, is sung by KK again, but is a composition of Rajiv Bhalla. The song is definitely one for KK though as there is very minimal music in the background and the whole ballad is lifted by KK alone. The lyrics are wonderful and all I want to say is, listen to it when u are at leisure, and you’d love it.

The next, Aankhein, is a Vivek Philip composition, and sounds like one. The song seems to follow the same style composition as in Jalte hain of Sorry Bhai. A soft, romantic, slow, but beat based song that will probably be liked the very first time you listen to it. And then, some really wonderful singing by Karthik. Do try.

In his next song, Saye Saye, Amit Trivedi gets a bit experimental and keeps Rekha Bharadwaj and Mohan singing kind of separately from the background beats. My guess is that the song is gonna be loved much by people in due time. Sounds like a slow addiction to me. Do listen to this one as well.

The last song Wandu yerudu (means one two), composed by Rajiv Bhalla, has some Hindi/Punjabi/Telugu words, in fact for the first half minute, one may think the song is Telugu only, after which Punjabi words start appearing. Not a great composition and definitely nothing like the other songs of the album. Probably an addition to the album for those who wanted a dance number, but I wonder how much it’ll work.

Anyway, overall the album is great and out of the six original tracks, five are definitely worth a listen, while Bangur and Aankhein are something to be loved. And then, Saye Saye can be the big surprise. Lovely album.

No One Killed Jessica: Music Review. Amit Trivedi.

There are two ways to listen to Dilli.

One. Rock your stereo and include/forget your neighbours.
Two. Fit your earphones well and turn the volume up.

Either way, Dilli rocks. The same deep pain that was there in some songs of Dev.D, has finally come back in Dilli. And while Amit Trivedi’s music is nothing less than awesome, Amitabh Bhaattacharya touches the emotions in very few words. If there is anything missing in the song, move to the hardcore version. * evil smile *

The second song, Aetbaar, brings Bollywood’s rockstar Vishal Dadlani with Amit Trivedi and the result is rocking. Wait, I’m using the word again. No, can’t help. This is a second rocking song in a row. The Sufi touch in ‘dil aetbaar karke ro raha hai’ with Vishal’s very rock singing is worth a praise. Lovable song, and particularly good lyrics by Amitabh.

The next song, Yeh Pal, is a solo by Shilpa Rao where she simply sings Amitabh Bhattacharya’s deep lyrics to a very light music, almost like a poem. While the second half of the same song is an instrumental with Aetbaar visible there. Good, though not catchy and so, may take its own time.

The next song is a very experimental Aali re, which is probably what may be an ‘Amit Trivedi Item Song.’ The song seems to have a Mumbaiyya soul, at least the title ‘aali re’ made me feel so. But with the lines ‘patloon mein junoon hai’ the song almost talks of Delhi too. OK. Don’t take an offence Delhi people. I just mean the not-so-minded-language of the place. Nice experiment, but not a great song. And no, this is Not Motumaster.

And then, there is Dua.

A beautiful voice, that of Meenal Jain, comes up to sing some words after a very light music and then a chorus, sorry, Joi, Raman and Amitabh join in to sing Sab sajde mein, sajde mein, sajde mein, dua karo, with Amit Trivedi turning the song into an anthem-ish style with that chorus and those army band style beats. Not exactly fresh, but effective nevertheless.

So overall, No One Killed Jessica is Good, and has things that you would like to have in an Amit Trivedi album, but then, beyond Dilli and Aetbaar, songs aren’t that fresh, and Aali re sounds like a failure at least for now. Still, will like to see how the song turns out with the video and more listening that is going to be there. So if you have hight hopes, you may be disappointed.

My say, buy the album for Dilli, its hardcore version and Aetbaar. And you will have two songs in bonus, even if you don’t count one. Dilli is the way to go, Sir Trivedi.

Gal Mitthi Mitthi Bol – Aisha (Tochi Raina)

After Dev.D, Amit Trivedi composes his next Punjabi song for Aisha. This time the song is sung by his favorite, singer of Pardesi and Iktara male version, Tochi Rainaa. The song is a not-so-fast dance number and instantly reminds you of Dev.D’s Punjabi numbers though the songs in Dev.D were sung by Labh Janjua. Anyway, the song is good and here are the lyrics of the song.

Gal mitthi mitthi bol, Bajne de taashe dhol..

Gal mitthi mitthi bol, ras kaano vich ghol
Bajne de taashe dhol, masti mein tu vi dol
Mann de naina tu khol
Chahat ke moti rol
Dil hunda ae anmol, ke daulat se na tol
Aa sohni tenu chaand ki main choodi pehrawa
Mainu kar de ishaara te main doli lai aanwa
Gal mitthi mitthi bol, ras kaano vich gol
Bajne de taashe dhol, masti mein tu vi dol
Continue reading “Gal Mitthi Mitthi Bol – Aisha (Tochi Raina)”

Suno Aisha…

If you think Amit Trivedi is all rock, think again. The Dev.D guy is into a full-fledged filmy mode this time and as you hear a peppy Suno Aisha, you can’t stop humming the words. If you haven’t heard the song, I can give you a rough idea of the song, say it’s somewhat like Jaane Kyun of Dostana, somewhat like Jab mila tu, somewhat like Kabhi Kabhi Aditi, and still unique.

If you still want to know more, listen to the song. 🙂

Here are the lyrics of the song.

Tum ho kamaal, tum bemisaal, tum lajawab ho aisha
Aisi haseen ho, jis ko choo lo usko haseen kar do
Tum sochti ho duniya mein koi bhi kyun kharaab ho aisha
Tum chahati ho tum koi rang har zindagi mein bhar do, bhar do

Nikli ho likhne kismat ki seekhi apni hi dhun mein tum aisha
Yeh shauk kya hai, yeh zid hai kaisi, itna bata do humko
Suljaane mein tum auron ki uljhane, hoti ho jo ghum aisha
Apni bhi koi uljhan ko door kar ke dikha do humko
Suno aisha, itna to tum bhi samjho
Aisha, tum chahe jitna chaho
Aisha, tum jitni koshish kar lo
Aisha, tum sa na hoga koi…
Continue reading “Suno Aisha…”

Aisha: Music Review

Amit Trivedi is here again. I was not even done with listening to his awesome Udaan, when he came back with Aisha. The good thing is that unlike Udaan, Aisha is not all typical Amit Trivedi in his favorite rock mood, but much more versatility. In fact with the present variety, you may count it as, something like half a Dev.D.

The first song of the album is Suno Aisha, which is a peppy number with some light, likeable experiments with instruments. The song that falls almost in line with Vishal-Shekhar’s Jaane Kyun and Jab mila tu, sounds different also because of the soft voices. By the way, with Amit Trivedi and more, the song even has Ash King, the guy who sang Dil gira daffatan for Rahman last year in Delhi 6.

The next song is the Punjabi piece, Gal Mitthi Mithi Bol, sung by Tochi Raina, the ‘Pardesi’ boy. The song is a hardcore Punjabi one with slow beats and quite carrying the flavor of Dev.D’s Punjabi songs.

The next song, Shaam, is a slow-soft, quite typical Amit Trivedi thing. When listening to the song for the first few times, you may think the song would go into rock mode but Amit n Neuman Pinto keep rendering the soulful lyrics of Javed Akhtar in a soft but typical mode of theirs. Reminds me of Aamir’s songs. Whatever it be, I love the boom boom boom para.

The fourth song of the album is Behke Behke, sung by Anushka Manchanda, Raman Mahadevan and Samrat. The song is a dance number with a touch of music that sounds somewhere between Caribbean and Arabic and even Goan to me. The song even reminds me of Honeymoon Travels’ Pyaar ki ye Kahani. Maybe I’m losing the genre but the whole point is the song is different, and good. Likeable stuff for sure. And some good singing by Anushka.

And the next song is Magic. O no, the name of the song is Lehrein, but the song has almost created a spell on me in the first few listenings only. Awesome singing by Anusha Mani again on some slow, soulful music and some touching lyrics by Javed Akhtar. I guess the best song of the album, and probably with this one, Amit Trivedi-Javed Akhtar will be able to recreate the magic of Iktara. Lovable.

By the way/tumse keh denge sung by Anushka Manchanda with Neuman Pinto is a fast paced dance number that doesn’t really sound like Amit Trivedi from any corner. The song is well sung by Anushka and the way she speaks in between, she reminds me of Aye Bachhu sung by Suzanne D’mello. Good but not great.

Besides, the album has two remixes, of Gal Mitthi Mitthi and Lehrein. The remix of Gal Mitthi is a common Punjabi song remix while Lehrein has got a lonuge mix that sounds pretty good.

Overall, Amit Trivedi has come up with some variety this time, thus bringing soemthing for those who said he was making only rock-ish songs after Dev.D. Must listen.

And yes, if you want to have my opinion on the best song, it’s simple I guess. Lehrein aayin, lehron mein beh gaye.

Lehren – Aisha

Lehren, sung by Anusha, Neuman Pinto and Nikhil is one of the best songs of the album, Aisha. The song is a slow, sad and deep one with some really good and touching lyrics by Javed Akhtar.

Here are the lyrics of the song.

khoyi khoyi si hoon main
kyun ye dil ka haal hai
dhundhle saare khaab hain
uljha har khayaal hai
saari kaliyaan murjha gayin
rang unke yaadon mein reh gaye
saare gharonde ret ke,
lehrein aayin lehron mein beh gaye.
Continue reading “Lehren – Aisha”

Shaam bhi koi – Aisha

And, as expected, Amit Trivedi does it. I was not even done with listening to Amit’s Udaan, and his Aisha is here. As per my rule, I decided to go for Amit’s self sung Shaam first, and the song just bowled me over. It’s a soft piece with Javed Akhtar’s matching lyrics. The song reminded me of Aamir and when I heard it the first time, there were times when I thought ‘here it goes into rock mode’, but the song never did. Soft, soulful, and Amit Trivedi’s typical. Well done by Neuman Pinto n Amit. Here are the lyrics of the song.
Continue reading “Shaam bhi koi – Aisha”

ik udaan kab talak qaid rahegi

It’s a small one, but definitely a good one. Udaan’s Nadi mein talab has some beautiful, inspiring lyrics coming from the pen of Amitabh Bhattacharya again. Here are the lyrics of the semi-rock song sung by Amit Trivedi, Joi Barua and Neuman Pinto.

Nadi mein talab hai, Kahin jo agar
Samandar kahan door hai
Damakti garaz hai, sone mein agar
To jalna bhi manzoor hai

Ik udaan kab talak yoon kaid rahegi
Roko na chhod do isse
Ik udaan hi sapno ko zindagi degi
Sapno se jod do isse
Continue reading “ik udaan kab talak qaid rahegi”

Naya Kuch Naya to Zaroor hai

One of the most inspiring songs of Udaan is Geet mein dhalte lafzon mein, sung by composer-lyricist duo Amit-Amitabh. The song is simply some awesome poetry of Amitabh Bhattacharya and you can feel the zest in almost every line of the song. Be it a hardcore ‘haan ye umangon se phoola hua seena, lamha ye maanga nahi ise humne chheena hai,’ or a more Gulzar-ish ‘jebon mein hum raatein liye ghooma karen‘, the song never goes down a bit in enthusiasm.

So here are the lyrics of the full of life song, with all my wishes to Amitabh Bhattacharya and even Amit Trivedi.

Geet mein dhalte lafzon mein
Taal pe chalti nabzon mein
Naya kuchh naya to zaroor hai
Shaam se leke sehron mein
Dhoop jadi duphero mein
Naya kuchh naya to zaroor hai

Kya baat hai jo baat hai taaza lage
Zindagi ki nayi nayi faza lage o..

Haan yeh umango se phoola hua seena hai
Lamha yeh maanga nahi, isse humne chheena hai
Yunhi jeena hai
Continue reading “Naya Kuch Naya to Zaroor hai”

Naav – Udaan: Lyrics

Naav or chadhti lehren laangh na paayen is probably the best song of Anurag Kashyap’s next production, Udaan, which has been composed by none other than Amit Trivedi and with lyrics of Amitabh Bhattacharya. The song, sung by Mohan, has a folkish touch and has Amit’s signature rock mood too. And somehow, I agree with my friend Dunkdaft who says the song reminds him of SD Burman too. Anyway, the song has some real good singing with some superb music but it’s the lyrics that I’m loving the most, so here are the lyrics of the song, as best as I could hear them.

chadhti lehren laangh na paayen kyun haanpti si naav hai teri naav hai teri
tinka tinka jod ke saanse kyun haanpti si naav hai teri naav hai teri
ulti behti dhaar hai bairi dhaar hai bairi
ulti behti dhaar hai bairi dhaar hai bairi
ke ab kuch kar ja re panthi..

jigar juta kya baat baandh le hai baat thehri jaan pe teri jaan pe teri
Haiya Ho Ki Taan Saath Le Jo Baat Tehri Jaan Pe Teri Shaan Pe Teri

Chal Jeet Jeet Lehra Parcham tu laal Phehra Ja
Ab Kar Ja Tu Ya Mar Ja Karle Taiyari
Udja Banke Dhoop Ka Panchi chura ke gehri chhaon Andheri Chaao Andheri
Tinka Tinka Joodle Saase Kyun Haanphti Si Naav Hai Teri

Rakh Dega JhakJhor ke tujhe
Tufano Ka Ghor Hai Dera Ghor Hai Dera
Bhanwar Se dar Jo Haar Maan Le
Kaheka Phir Jor Hai Tera Jor Hai Tera

Hai Dil Mei Roshni Tere
Tu Cheer Daal Sab Ghere
Lehron Ki Gardan Kas Ke
Daal Phande Re

Ki Dariyan Bole waaha Re Panthi
Saar Ankhon Pe Naav Hai Teri Naav Hai Teri
Chadti Lehren Laangh Na Paaye
Kyun Hanpti Si Naav Hai Teri Naav Hai Teri

Ulti Behti Dhaar Hai Bairi Dhaar Hai Bairi
Ulti Behti Dhaar Hai Bairi Dhaar Hai Bairi
Ke Ab Kuch Kar Ja Re panthi..

Update: Full meaning of the song is Here.