Heroine: Music Review (Salim-Sulaiman)

If you had suddenly got some big hopes from Salim-Sulaiman like I did, this might be a disappointment for you.

Yes, Salim-Sulaiman seem to have got the best of their creativity in Halkat Jawani itself. Even though Heroine is not exactly something to discard and has a few good things, Salim-Sulaiman are finally looking like a spent force and probably not looking for a comeback.

With that negative note, let me start a review that I hope is not biased against them.

And so, let’s begin with Khwahishen, which is probably the best song of the album. A ‘new’ (all terms are relative) song from Salim-Sulaiman, sung by Shreya Ghoshal, it’s a nice compostion with some above good lyrics. Zindagi ko dheere dheere dasti hain khwahishen is something I’d go for. Nothing special for Shreya as such, but she anyway sings it well. Worth listening to, at least.

The next song, the last in the album (but not in the review) is Tujhpe Fida. A song that already sounds like a remixed pop number, but does sound nice. Benny Dayal is almost a default choice for the song, and Shaddha Pandit does fine here. Still, with all the arrangements in the song, cannot help feeling it lies a lot somewhere between Aadat se Majboor n Thug Le.

Halkat Jawani. Frankly, item songs in general don’t interest me much anymore. Don’t know if Mamta Munni Sharma (or excess of her voice, everywhere) is the cause, but the result is what it is. Still, Halkat Jawani was something that kinda gripped me. The composition is simple, catchy, and Sunidhi’s singing is just superb. I mean, I think to a large extent she’s the one responsible for making most of our heroines worth their ‘salt’, literally. Not saying much about the song, I liked the song and loved Sunidhi there. And yes Salim-Sulaiman, this was a nice one. Thanks for that.

Saaiyaan. Rahat Fateh Ali Khan. Yeh Hausla Kaise Ruke.

I don’t know how much, but the song is a lot of ye hausla and I could only hear Dor in the song for the first few times. Or more than a few times. So much that I wasn’t able to like the simple lyrics. Salim-Sulaiman seem to have taken re-creation a little too literally here. However, other than that, the song in itself is good. With most other songs of this type (which sound like a clone/copy), it should find its place after some time of being called a clone.

Main Heroine Hoon. You can probably guess what type of the song it would be. Something like other Madhur Bhandarkar title songs. But somehow it sounds a little more ordinary, at least in the beginning. The song should go up slowly with promotion which I suppose will be there. As for Aditi, her singing is really nice here. From the uber-softness of katra-katra, she’s reached the attitude of Main heroine hoon quite well.

So overall, even though not really make me believe in Salim-Sulaiman, is fairly okay. Halkat Jawani and Khwahishen are nice, and despite problems, so is Saaiyaan. The rest are kinda okay. Short, crisp, not too good, but well, manageable.

Jo Dooba So Paar, It’s Love in Bihar: Music Review

Of course, the movie is supposed to be interesting and so is the music in case of Jo Dooba So Paar, It’s Love in Bihar, if you have seen the promo even once. Here is a review of the album, composed by Manish J Tipu.

The album starts with Tochi Raina and Pia Sukanya’s Shiv ka baaje damru. The song, which is supposed to be romantic, has been added some linguistic elements which can make you laugh too, like ‘chanda bhi kankhi se dekhe tujhe, kudrat ka khela hai tu full too.’ The music and arrangements are simple but powerful and suit the settings of the movie.

The next song, Raghubir Yadav’s Andey garam garam is a satire with the basic tune of Andey garam garam going on that of Vande Mataram. The lyrics of the song, which are probably the most important thing here, are quite interesting, and in places quite thought-provoking. In short, even though this one is not as straightforward from the first line as Mehngai Dayan was, I’d say the song is bang on.

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Mujhse Fraaandship Karoge: Music Review (Raghu Dixit)

Welcome to Bollywood, Mr Project. (For the uninitiated, Raghu Dixit is the only guy I know whose band is called Project. Hence the loving name.)

Dhaeon Dhaeon sung by Vishal Dadlani and Aditi Singh Sharma is addictive, and still it’s not what you call come n go. Nice.

Ash King and Shilpa Rao’s Uh-oh-uh-oh kya hua is something to love. The music, especially the orchestration of the song sounds quite simple, but I don’t think many people can do it this nicely. Beautiful job by the composer, as well as both the singers. DO listen.
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Damadamm: Music Review (Himesh Reshammiya, Sachin Gupta)

Himesh Reshammiya in Sufi style, with background all bass, makes a nice start, but Damadamm masti masti mast kalandar part of the title song could be a bit more innovative I guess. Still, the song does sound nice, and with all those voices, there is almost no nasal factor in the song. Nice one. Worth a try even if you’re not a Himesh fan.

No touching (toucheeng). Only sing (seeng). Or Umrao Jaan, as they call it. Interesting. Not really quality stuff. Nasal too. But highly addictive. Dhol. Tabla. And not too much western background stuff. Not high quality, but interesting, I repeat.

Meri Gali Aaja ve Mahiya, the next, has strong bass in background, and is a bit of typical Himesh, but is a bit slow and if you don’t mind a slight nasal touch, or simply don’t hate Himesh’s voice, I guess you might well like it. Not bad, at least. Especially liked the last minute of the less than one minute song.

The next comes Madhushala, or Ishq Unplugged, that was earlier the title of the movie. Aditi Singh Sharma is really nice in her English rendition, while Himesh is highly nasal, beating even Saigal and at the same speed, for two lines, and then for two lines he comes to his natural self. In the second part Aditi also gets nasal, while Himesh gets all un-nasal immediately after. And while listening to all these ups and downs, I liked the song. Highly experimental, kinda addictive, and definitely worth a listen for the ups and downs it has got.
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Mere Brother ki Dulhan: Music Review (Sohail Sen)

Sohail Sen for the first time gets something worthwhile outside Ashutosh Gowariker’s camp, and he looks keen on making it big. Here is a review of his entry into YRF, Mere Brother ki Dulhan.

The album starts with the title song Mere Brother ki Dulhan, a fast paced, quickly addictive, likable number with some interesting lyrics from Irshad Kaamil sung by KK.

I was still in the first song when a chorus broke into some rocky words and Neha Bhasin into Dhunki Dhunki Dhunki laage. While the music is lovely, it’s Neha who surprises me with her lovely singing here. She’s been good in some Salim-Sulaiman songs earlier, in Fashion, as well as Pyaar Impossible, but this could be the song that would restate her entry into Hindi film industry.

The next song Chhoo Mantar is, I would say, a typical Sohail Sen piece, with his signature beats, and if I didn’t know it from the cover, I’d say is sung by him as well. Yes, it’s bad how I still don’t get Benny Dayal’s voice after so many of his songs that I completely love. Aditi Singh Sharma is as soft and husky with her voice here as she always is.

Isq Risk, the next song, sung by Rahat Fateh Ali Khan, gives a little small surprise in the beginning as you hear a radio (read AIR) style prologue to the song, telling whose music and words the song has. Sohail Sen’s melody is a bit ’90s in its treatment, but with Rahat singing, the song sounds pretty nice. Irshad Kamil’s words are lovely here.

Ali Zafar’s only entry in the soundtrack, Madhubala is simply enjoyable. I don’t think I want to use any other word for the song. It’s his signature ‘Masti’ that literally shows up here, nicely supported by Shweta Pandit.

Shahid Mallya, another name that is a bit new for me, is growing up quite fast nowadays. After Naina wali Whiskey in Sahi Dhandhe Galat Bande and with Mausam lined up for him, it’s the third place I have seen his name in this week, for Do Dhaari Talwar here. The song, with a little Punjabi flavor in it, mostly because of Shahid’s singing style and percussion based arrangements, is quite fast paced and enjoyable, though doesn’t look like very long lasting.

Overall, MBKD is a typical Yashraj album with songs that will be liked instantly by the public. Be it the title song or Dhunki, Isq risk or Madhubala, the composer is quite clear on what he wants the song to do and I feel that it would be a big plus for the movie. Go buy it if you like typical hit soundtracks of Bollywood.

PS: One interesting thing about the album is that even though Yashraj use a new composer here, many of the singers are the ones who have sung a lot for YRF, with their regular composers Salim-Sulaiman, especially Benny Dayal, Neha Bhasin and Shweta Pandit.

Always Kabhi Kabhi: Music Review (Pritam, Aashish, Shree D)

The album starts with Aashish Rego and Shree D’s only composition for the album, which happens to be the title track of the album. The song, sung by Bhavin Dhanak, Sanah Moidutty and Apeksha Dandekar, is a usual, funky-colleg-y number that is full of nice beats, but the less than four minutes’ track takes a lovely turn when a Sufiana voice enters the song almost a minute before the end of the song. Still don’t know which of the singers it is, but completely loved the entry, especially the way it happens there. Shame that the voice doesn’t sing much.

From the second song onwards, it gets Pritam. Antenna sounds a lot like some song from Ready, probably the sound matches character dheela hai. Also, the lyrics are written by Amitabh Bhattacharya, but didn’t like the concept of the song itself. Still, the sound of the song IS catchy and can catch up well with some good promotion.
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Game (2011) Music Review – Shankar Ehsaan Loy

I can sum up the album in one sentence. It’s not upto the name of Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy.

The album starts with Vishal Dadlani’s It’s a game. While the song is not an instant thing, Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy’s arrangements with a hangover of Karthik Calling Karthik make Vishal’s good singing work to some extent. You may like it if you pay some attention.

The reprise version sung by Sunitha Sarath seems dull, probably because the voice lacks the life that Vishal has in his voice.

Kaun hai Ajnabi
has some lovely vocals by KK and Aditi Singh Sharma, but the song sounds more of a Pritam number than SEL’s. Not bad, though nothing great. Interestingly, the remix of the song works equally good.

Maine ye kab socha tha is a different side of the album where Shaan comes up to sing a romantic number with Anusha Mani, supported by Loy and almost a chorus, something like in We are Family. Though the song is quite good in parts, it doesn’t really sound like one song in whole and that may be a reason for its failure.

The last original number, Mehki Mehki, sung by Shreya Ghoshal and Kshitij, is a different sound and almost enters the territory of A R Rahman. At some points I just felt like I have heard the song, but it was probably just the ambiance and hence I couldn’t point towards any song. With a slight touch of old Bollywood songs of maybe ’70s and all these new mentioned things, Mehki Mehki is definitely something worth a try. Listen to it and probably you will fall for it in due time.

As for the remix of Mehki Mehki, it’s not bad, but the song loses the beautiful arrangements that existed in the original version and made the soul of the song, so nothing much to listen to here.

Overall, Game is an okay album but if you’re thinking of buying the album just because you know Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy and you know their standard, you may be in for a little disappointment.

Mumbai Mast Kallander: Music Review

The album starts with Sloshed, a song composed by Teenu Arora, though it sounds quite like a Pritam composition as it’s sung by Neeraj Shridhar in his typical way, the way he sings all the Pritam songs. Saru Maini doesn’t offer much of a deviation, but the songs sounds quite fine, with Neeraj taking most of the credit for that.

The next, the title song, Mumbai Mast Kalandar, is more of a background thing with some rap and some pop. While some of the lyrics sound almost meaningless, some lines are quite good too, making the song overall an okay experience. If promoted well, the song has a potential to be liked.
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Admissions Open (Amit Trivedi): Music Review

Amit Trivedi’s next. Oops! That must be big. But as I start listening to the album, I get a bit disappointed, because the poply popping Aasmaan ke paar chalo doesn’t sound all that good for the first time, and certainly not that Amit Trivedi’ish (Read Dev.D’ish). But after listening to the song quite a few times, one is bound to bounce on the beats of this number. It’s not a Trive.D song and does take some time to be liked. Some.
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