Tezzz: Music Review (Sajid-Wajid)

Recently I was watching an interview of Sonu Nigam. Money was being discussed and Sonu was asked if there are music directors for whom he sings for free at times. And the answer was yes, but the first name he took was a bit of a surprise for me. It was none other than Sajid-Wajid. Not like I don’t have reasons to believe they are good composers or Sonu Nigam shouldn’t enjoy great relationship with them (he got his biggest pop hit, Deewana, from Sajid-Wajid), but it just wasn’t a big enough name somehow. I think that’s gonna change now.

Yep. Sajid-Wajid sound like a very ’90s composers at times, but their greatness exists in the fact that even when they sound like ’90s, they are so good with it that you end up loving them. The only problems they have had is that they have not really been very consistent, and of course, they haven’t had very big names to work with, with a regular exception of Salman Khan. The latter is changing, and I hope that the former changes too.

OK that was a long prologue for a small album with just four original tracks, though there are twelve versions on the disk. So here we go on Tezzz.

The album starts with the gem of a song called Tere bina tere bina dil naiyo lagda, sung by Rahat Fateh Ali Khan. A nice melody, and quite some Nadeem-Shravan’ish treatment is what the song has, but neither of the two is mediocre and some simple singing from Rahat is enough to make the song lovable. And that is what it is. Lovely.

Tezzz title song sung by Sunidhi is an average number, with a little Abbas-Mustan feel to it, which seems to be going with the movie. Sunidhi’s singing is good here, but the results are more or less just okay. Maybe the song will be liked a bit more with time and promotion.

Mohit Chauhan singing for Sajid-Wajid is something rare, if not a first. However, the duo give the master singer a song that fits his voice perfectly and the treatment is more or less the same as he generally gets from Pritam, with an added Chorus for him singing tere saaye mein, which makes the romantic song more devotional. A simple, light, romantic number, with the added chorus adding a little more to the song.

Laila, the next by Sunidhi is an average number again, and somehow after not liking it after listening to it a few times, didn’t feel like listening to it more. Passable.

For the next track, Shreya Ghoshal comes to sing Tere bina tere bina, which sounds perfectly good, but a little more ‘old’, a little more ’90s. Probably because Rahat’s adds a little twist to a song, you don’t feel it so much in the male version. However, worth a listen for sure. Do listen and decide for yourself if you like this one more.

Shaan’s version of Tezzz is not really great. Wondering if this could have been given to KK. Not sticking much on remixes, I shift towards the sad version of Tere Bina, which I presume could be better with a few more twists thrown in with that simplicity. The last thing I would like to say a little about is Tere Bina (Indian) version. Sudden thought: It’s still Rahat singing, so how’s it more Indian? Well, jokes apart, the version is a little more towards Aashiqui as beats come more from the Tabla here and that IS nice, but I think a little more Indianization of the version could make things more interesting.

Overall, Tezzz has got quite some nice music from Sajid-Wajid, even if it doesn’t go equally in all the songs. Other than that, the album has got a little too many versions. I think if you don’t want to go into much and want to get the sure shot numbers, go for Rahat’s version of Tere Bina and Mohit’s Main hoon shab. And if it’s a little more, you can try the Indian version and Shreya’s version as well.

Author: Harshit

Madman. So-called Computer Engineer. Hindi Music Freak. Hindi Movie Buff. Thinker. Reader. Critic. Blogger. PJist. (bath)room Singer. Madman.

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