Always Kabhi Kabhi: Music Review (Pritam, Aashish, Shree D)

The album starts with Aashish Rego and Shree D’s only composition for the album, which happens to be the title track of the album. The song, sung by Bhavin Dhanak, Sanah Moidutty and Apeksha Dandekar, is a usual, funky-colleg-y number that is full of nice beats, but the less than four minutes’ track takes a lovely turn when a Sufiana voice enters the song almost a minute before the end of the song. Still don’t know which of the singers it is, but completely loved the entry, especially the way it happens there. Shame that the voice doesn’t sing much.

From the second song onwards, it gets Pritam. Antenna sounds a lot like some song from Ready, probably the sound matches character dheela hai. Also, the lyrics are written by Amitabh Bhattacharya, but didn’t like the concept of the song itself. Still, the sound of the song IS catchy and can catch up well with some good promotion.

Suhail Kaul and Ishq Bector’s School ke din is a well designed, well sung number from Pritam. The alternate use of Ishq Bector’s rap and Suhail’s touching voice (remember Baatein kuch ankahi si from Life in a Metro?) talking about something like school days is wonderful. Go for it.

The next song is Sunidhi sung Better not mess with me (Rock Mix), an okay composition with a not too good treatment. Probably the song doesn’t suite the rock mode that well. OK.

The next, called Undi the Condi, is sung by Shaan and Aditi Singh Sharma. As far as my knowledge of sound goes, this sounds like a typical college-dance number, something from the school of Ishk-Vishk to understand, though the genre is quite old. And let me tell you, while Shaan sounds fine in the song, it’s Aditi who sounds almost as sweet as she did in Katra Katra of Dev.D, almost beating Shaan with her sweetness. Nothing too great, but liked it.

Enters Naresh Iyer with a ‘Soul Version’ of Jaane Kyon (Don’t look back, the song is coming for the first time in the album). The song is a good composition and Naresh’s almost flawless singing makes it even better, but somehow the guy sounds a bit nasal, probably only in his ‘ye’ while singing, tujh bin tanha han ye raatein… Probably the best of the album yet.

Remember ye dil hai nakhrewala? The girl, Shefali Alvaris, sings the club mix for Better not mess with me, and to me at least, sounds much more natural than Sunidhi did in the song. Nice singing for sure. NOW I like this song too.

Next is a Sufi version of Jaane Kyon and this one comes from none other than Shafqat Amanat Ali Khan, who almost effortlessly sings as good as Naresh Iyer, and listening to the songs once, I cannot decide which version is better. OK, probably Shafqat has done better here. Lovely song.

Now, while the original ‘Antenna‘ had Benny Dayal and Roshan Abbas singing, the ‘reloaded’ ‘SRK mix’ upgrades to KK and Anupam Amod and the song sounds like ‘Love Mera Hit Hit’ to me. Wanna compare again? Reloaded is the version. I sometimes (read with every album) wonder why Pritam has so many versions. One of those times again.

The last song happens to be an unplugged version of the title song, sung by Vinnie Hutton and Apeksha Dandekar. The song, much in English, is beautifully sung and sounds probably better than the original version simply because of the way it is sung. The use of chorus near the end is nice again.

Overall, Always Kabhi Kabhi doesn’t have anything much different but some things in the album can click as Pritam gives some regular, but good music here. Look out for School ke Din and Jaane Kyon. SRK is anyway gonna make you listen to Antenna. 😛

The album starts with Aashish Rego and Shree D’s only composition for the album, which happens to be the title track of the album. The song, sung by Bhavin Dhanak, Sanah Moidutty and Apeksha Dandekar, is a usual, funky-colleg-y number that is full of nice beats, but the less than four minutes’ track takes a lovely turn when a Sufiana voice enters teh song almost a minute before the end of the song. Still don’t know which of the singers it is, but completely loved the entry, especially the way it happens there. Shame that it doesn’t sing much.

From the second song onwards, it gets Pritam. Antenna sounds a lot like some song from Ready, probably the sound matches character dheela hai. Also, the lyrics are written by Amitabh Bhattacharya, but didn’t like the concept of the song itself. Still, the sound of the song IS catchy and can catch up well with some good promotion.

Suhail Kaul and Ishq Bector’s School ke din is a well designed, well sung number from Pritam. The alternate use of Ishq Bector’s rap and Suhail’s touching voice (remember Baatein kuch ankahi si from Life in a Metro?) talking about something like school days is wonderful. Go for it.

The next song is Sunidhi sung Better not mess with me (Rock Mix), an okay composition with a not too good treatment. Probably the song doesn’t suite the rock mode that well. OK.

The next, called Undi the Condi, is sung by Shaan and Aditi Singh Sharma. As far as my knowledge of sound goes, this sounds like a typical college-dance number, something from the school of Ishk-Vishk to understand, though the genre is quite old. And let me tell you, while Shaan sounds fine in the song, it’s Aditi who sounds almost as sweet as she did in Katra Katra of Dev.D, almost beating Shaan with her sweetness. Nothing too great, but liked it.

Enters Naresh Iyer with a ‘Soul Version’ of Jaane Kyon (Don’t look back, the song is coming for the first time in the album). The song is a good composition and Naresh’s almost flawless singing makes it even better, but somehow the guy sounds a bit nasal, probably only in his ‘ye’ while singing, tujh bin tanha han ye raatein… Probably the best of the album yet.

Remember ye dil hai nakhrewala? The girl, Shefali Alvaris, sings the club mix for Better not mess with me, and to me at least, sounds much more natural than Sunidhi did in the song. Nice singing for sure. NOW I like this song too.

Next is a Sufi version of Jaane Kyon and this one comes from none other than Shafqat Amanat Ali Khan, who almost effortlessly sings as good as Naresh Iyer, and listening to the songs once, I cannot decide which version is better. OK, probably Shafqat has done better here. Lovely song.

Now, while the original ‘Antenna’ had Benny Dayal and Roshan Abbas singing, the ‘reloaded’ ‘SRK mix’ upgrades to KK and Anupam Amod and the song sounds like ‘Love Mera Hit Hit’ to me. Wanna compare again? Reloaded is the version. I sometimes (read with every album) wonder why Pritam has so many versions. One of those times again.

The last song happens to be an unplugged version of the title song, sung by Vinnie Hutton and Apeksha Dandekar. The song, much in English, is beautifully sung and sounds probably better than the original version simply because of the way it is sung. The use of chorus near the end is nice again.

Overall, Always Kabhi Kabhi doesn’t have anything much different but some things in the album can click as Pritam gives some regular, but good music here. Look out for School ke Din and Jaane Kyon. SRK is anyway gonna make you listen to Antenna. 😛

लेखक: Harshit

Madman. So-called Computer Engineer. Hindi Music Freak. Hindi Movie Buff. Thinker. Reader. Critic. Blogger. PJist. (bath)room Singer. Madman.

“Always Kabhi Kabhi: Music Review (Pritam, Aashish, Shree D)” पर 3 विचार

  1. Hello Sir,

    This is Babbu matharoo …..
    I wanna tell you that HARMEET SINGH sung the (Sufi part) title track for this film (ALWAYS KABHI KABHI)….but his name is not there..
    so plz update it
    Regards
    (you can see his name on original CD cover of ALWAYS KABHI KABHI)

    Contact no.
    098037-09500

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